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Recognition in The Real World
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Standard Success Stories: BAE Systems Recognition Strategy

Posted By By Jess Myers, RPI, Friday, January 19, 2018

Note: RPI’s Seven Best Practice Standards are the cornerstone of successful employee recognition and rewards programs. In 2018, we are taking a closer look at each of the seven standards and RPI members who have been recognized for their practice of those standards. In the first installment, we take a look at Recognition Strategy, and the award-winning way that BAE Systems practices this standard. The RPI Best Practice Awards are now open for nominations through February 1, 2018.

BAE Systems, based in Arlington, Virginia, was a recipient of three Best in Class awards:

  • Standard 1- Recognition Strategy
  • Standard 4 - Communication Plan
  • Standard 7 - Program Change and Flexibility

BAE Systems takes pride in its recognition strategy programs. From their award-winning entry, they offer several samples of the ideas and actions behind their recognition strategy efforts.

Employees at BAE Systems participate in IMPACT, a company-wide program to recognize and reward employee accomplishments. It is tied to the company’s Total Performance culture and their company values: trusted, innovative and bold. IMPACT’s goal is to make it easy to recognize employees for making an impact on their business.

They measure day-to-day recognition through the IMPACT program. The company’s non-monetary “Rave” award is a special thank you for employees who take on additional responsibilities to help another employee.

Informal recognition is also measured through the IMPACT system via the Pioneer award, which rewards those who have contributed to a team or project or other achievement in a way that aligns to the company’s aforementioned core values. Pioneer awards range in value from $25 to $250 and are based on business-related criteria. The company also offers informal recognition via service anniversaries, birthdays and celebrations like company picnics.

BAE Systems also supports a robust formal recognition program, offering three possible rewards:

  • Pathfinder recipients lead or contribute to a project, program or achievement that aligns t the core values. These awards can range from $500 to $10,000 and are measured through IMPACT.
  • Trailblazer recipients lead a team on a significant project or program with significance that aligns to the company’s core values. These awards can range from $10,000 to $50,000 and are measured through IMPACT.
  • Chairman’s Awards are further broken down into three categories that recognize and celebrate the work of BAE Systems employees in:
    • Business Leader Award
    • Executive Committee Award
    • Chairman’s Gold Award

The basis for all the awards is the core values that BAE Systems identifies and promotes. They seek employee behavior that is:

  • Trusted to deliver on commitments
  • Innovative in finding and turning ideas and technologies into solutions
  • Bold in accepting new challenges and managing risk

The results have shown not only been award from RPI, but in celebration of their awards programs and strategy. For more information on BAE Systems, the Chairman’s Awards and their success with Recognition Strategy, please visit the company culture website at: https://www.baesystems.com/en/our-company/about-us

Tags:  7 Best Practice Standards  7 Best Practices  recognition strategies  success stories 

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Standard Success Stories: RBC’s Recognition Strategy

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Tuesday, January 9, 2018
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Note: RPI’s Seven Best Practice Standards are the cornerstone of successful employee recognition and rewards programs. In 2018, we are taking a closer look at each of the seven standards and RPI members who have been recognized for their practice of those standards. In the first installment, we take a look at Recognition Strategy, and the award-winning way that RBC practices this standard. The RPI Best Practice Awards nominations are now open for nominations through February 1, 2018.

RBC, based in Toronto, was a recipient of the Overall RPI Best Practice® Award in 2017, and is a shining example of how to do recognition strategy right. From their award-winning entry, they offer several samples of the ideas and actions behind their recognition strategy efforts.

All of RBC’s recognition and reward programs under the RBC Performance brand align with their Purpose, Vision and Values to become a leader in financial services wherever in the world they serve customers. That vision and those values help drive their recognition programs and are part of the criteria within the RBC Performance recognition and reward program.

RBC Performance, which is their flagship program, was launched in 1993 as a sales incentive points reward and recognition program and now serves over 75,000 employees. Among the core points of the program are:

  • Day-to-Day Recognition – RBC associates give and receive recognition to and from their peers and from retail branch managers and regional leaders on a regular basis.
  •  InstantThanks – RBC’s social recognition program permits employees so say thanks and send commendation comments and recognition for demonstrating our values and excellent customer service.
  • Branch Huddles – These happen before the bank door opens. Here customer service and product information is given. Managers and team members weave in recognition as often as they can.
  • Informal Recognition – RBC Performance is a comprehensive recognition system dedicated to improving RBC’s financial and service performance results.
  • RBC Performance Nominations and Awards – Employees can recognize individuals and teams who consistently go beyond expectations and make a difference in the business. RBC employees can nominate a colleague or team with RBC Performance’s online nomination feature. Nominations are based on RBC’s values and other key behaviors, and are expected to focus on outstanding performance in these categories. Managers select nominations based on merit and can award point values to send to the employee. The number of nominations and awards received contributes to selecting who attends the RBC Performance Conference.
  • Scratch ‘n Win Cards – Managers can give these cards for on-the-spot recognition. Employees virtually “scratch” a bar online to reveal a point value or the chance to be entered into a monthly draw.
  • Sales Campaigns – Managers in retail banking can recognize and reward employees and teams with points for achieving highest sales or service activities in any quarterly sales campaign.

The company also believes in more formal recognition, with a series of events and awards:

  • Leo Awards – This is RBC’s Academy-award-style celebration event. Employees who showcase the very best in sales, service or support are recognized at a special event during the RBC Performance Conference with “The Leo” Award. Regional leaders select Leo Award recipients from RBC Performance Conference recipients.
  • RBC Performance Conference – This is the best-of-the best annual conference for RBC’s top performers. Each region has a set number of eligible nominees to select. Quarterly Point Award winners are eligible candidates. Regional presidents and senior leaders choose conference attendees from across all roles. Conference winners are announced at each Regional Gala event. Each awardee receives a registration package to attend the Conference.
  • RBC Service Awards – Employees receive a choice of a gift award item on their milestone anniversary at two, five, 10, 15 years and in five-year increments up to 50-year level.

The results have not only been award from RPI, but recognition of RBC as one of the best places to work in Canada. For more information on RBC and their success with Recognition Strategy, please visit the company culture website at: https://www.rbc.com/careers/people-culture-awards.html

Tags:  employee engagement  formal recognition  RBC  recognition  recognition strategies  RPI 7 Best Practices  Strategy  success stories  Toronto 

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A Conversation with Outgoing RPI Board Member Rita Maehling

Posted By By Jess Myers, RPI, Tuesday, January 2, 2018
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The New Year will bring changes, as Minnesota-based Rita Maehling is leaving the RPI board – but certainly not leaving the world of recognition professionals – after serving a term-plus. We had a conversation with her about her time with RPI and the industry’s changes over the past nearly two decades.

Tell us a little about when and why you got involved with RPI.

I joined RPI in 2002 when I became an independent consultant. I had a passion around recognition and had actually co-authored a book on the topic in 1990. I wanted to share my experience and continue to work with others, so I was thrilled to find a bevy of like-minded practitioners and service-providers with whom I could learn and contribute.

Initially I was a member at large and then in 2004 I got involved in setting up the certification process. I was a member of the education committee and we presented a proposal to the board which was accepted, to embark on what we now call the Certified Recognition Professional® certification program.

CRP is one of the hallmarks of your time with RPI. How did that start?

I became the instructional designer for the original four courses. That was a paid position that I bid on and was selected. We started with CRP 1 in 2006, then launched CRP 2 in the fall of that year. In 2007 we launched CRP 3 and 4. We selected instructors and continued doing training both at the conference and on-site.

We had lots of opportunity to work with some great people at Rideau and trained 60 of their staff members, which was a huge undertaking for them. We worked with lots of great organizations to bring CRP into their workplaces. It’s been an honor to watch that grow and expand.

Making CRP available online has been a big change. What was your role in that transition?

I served as the project manager on the first conversion of CRP 1 to an online format. Subsequently I worked on all of the online conversions.

It allows people from the comfort of their own home or from their workplace to do self-paced learning and become a Certified Recognition Professional® within probably a third the time of the classroom program.

When did your role on the RPI board start?

I joined the board around 2012 and stayed on for one term, then I filled in for someone who had to roll off the board, so I’ve served for around four years.

I retired from working last year, so I’m kind of scaling down my professional organizational role somewhat. I still plan to remain a member and attend the conference, participating with the education team. I won’t have a leadership role any longer, but I am sure I will be a sideline coach moving forward. From a legacy standpoint, everything is in pretty good shape and people can build on the foundation we started in 2006.

How has the industry changed most significantly during your career?

The technology has been the biggest change, for sure. Everything was paper-based when I started and things were more laborious from an administrative standpoint. The technology has added speed, efficiency and the capability for social media recognition. We’re finding new and great ways to recognize people like internal Facebook pages, for example. Tracking and even fulfillment have changed greatly due to technology. It’s really streamlined and added much ease and capability to the industry.

What are the plusses of serving on the RPI board?

If people are considering a board position, even longer term, I think it’s the best was to leverage your membership, by getting involved in the strategy of the organization. There is such a wealth of knowledge within the board and within the organization itself from myriad perspectives. You have huge organizations like Wells Fargo and Cargill down to the little fish in the big pond. You’ve got government and healthcare and business providers, so everyone brings a different perspective and it really is the melting pot and the pushes all those organizations forward.

From a resume-builder standpoint it looks good to say you’ve been on the board of directors, and it’s great from a professional development standpoint. There are many great benefits to getting more involved.

Tags:  CRP  recognition strategies  RPI board 

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CRP Graduates Tout The Certification’s Value

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Friday, August 11, 2017

Since its launch a decade ago, recognition professionals from every corner of North America have learned the value of certification to their career and their organization’s employee engagement success. Recognition Professionals International made all of its Certified Recognition Professional® (CRP) courses available online in February, to grow our graduate community.

In recent weeks, several recognition professionals have offered their testimonials about CRP, and the value it provides in the profession:

“Since becoming a Certified Recognition Professional nine years ago, I have used the knowledge, expertise and industry best practices I gained to help my clients structure award-winning, sustainable programs.  Each year RPI offers opportunities for professional development that allow CRPs to remain on the cutting edge of this dynamic industry and I am grateful to be a part of this thriving community.” – Dee Hansford, CRP, Dee Hansford Consulting.

“I have found the CRP certification to be valuable not only to my professional growth, but most importantly a great benefit to the clients that I support. The certification has given me the confidence to guide clients to best practice recognition solutions. This is critical for building a culture of appreciation and the long-term success of their recognition initiatives.” – Kelli Johnson, CRP, Launch Manager, O.C. Tanner Company.

“Having worked in and out of the recognition industry for the past 15 years, it wasn’t until I went through the certification process that I fully understood the systematic methods and strategies of recognition and incentives. Obtaining my CRP and going through recertification has provided a fundamental foundation as well as competencies required for implementing and assessing programs/campaigns.  If you are thinking about pursuing your certification, just GO FOR IT!”  – Lori Rains, MA, CRP, Senior Program Manager, Spear One.

“Obtaining my CRP was the icing on the cake when I was called to write a reward and recognition program for over 10,000 employees. Having the resources and materials to reflect on my learning ensured that we had a quality recognition program using the best poractice standards.  I encourage anyone who has a passion or their job supports reward and recognition to take the RPI CRP program.  The networking and information is invaluable!  Thanks RPI.” – Carole Erken, CRP, Director of Human Resources, Kaiser Permanente.

“Going through the RPI certification was certainly a turning point in my career. As a solutions provider, it was extremely beneficial to learn more in depth about the science behind recognition and study the countless examples of what drives success. There were many ‘A-ha’ moments throughout. The focus on seven best practices and why they are crucial to a successful recognition program forms the basis of what RPI is all about. Amazing organization, I’d highly recommend the CRP courses they have certainly helped in my career, by influencing our internal strategy for recognition as well as how we deliver for our clients.” – Mark A. Prine, CRP, Vice President, National Accounts, EGR International Inc.

Goals of the CRP program include:

  • To raise the professional standards of those engaged in employee recognition.
  • To encourage continuing education for professional development.
  • To encourage self-development by offering guidelines for achievement in the employee recognition profession.
  • To identify and award special recognition to those persons who have demonstrated a comprehensive knowledge of those principles and practices of employee recognition and also laws governing and affecting employee recognition.

CRP designation consists of four courses and exams. All CRP candidates receive the comprehensive learning guide which includes valuable templates, worksheets and case studies that can be utilized to implement a recognition program based on RPI’s Seven Best Practices. Each course is $595 for practitioner premium/business partner members; $750 for basic RPI members and $795 for non-members. Until October 1, 2017, participants can save $75 on each course by using the promo code “Recognition17” when registering.

CRP designation demonstrates to leaders, peers and clients a commitment to continuing education and excellence in the discipline of workforce recognition. RPI’s program is renowned as the most comprehensive, authoritative resource for individuals seeking to develop and test their skills and knowledge within this field.

RPI offers a webinar featuring additional testimonials from several CRP graduates. For more information, please visit the official RPI website, www.rec

 

Tags:  certification  CRP  employee engagement  recognition strategies 

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