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Recognition in The Real World
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Excuse Busting: Top 4 "Reasons" Managers do not use recognition

Posted By Kathie Pugaczewski, RPI, Tuesday, November 20, 2018

Excuse Busting: Top 4 "Reasons" Managers do not use recognition

“Not enough time.” “It’s meaningless to my team.” “It’s not appreciated so why try?”

We all know these managers, the ones who look at employee recognition and scoff. Employee Recognition Programs have been shown as key indicators of a company’s culture and a resource for employee retention. In a time when high employee retention is at the top of every organization’s wishlist, it is time to get buy in from your leaders and managers. Bust the most common excuses and engage your leadership to create and build a successful program that will leave your team motivated and committed.

Top Excuses from Managers and how to “bust” them

  1. It’s not a part of my job to provide recognition/it’s not important

    Yes it is.

    As mentioned above, almost all employees expect to receive recognition for their work, and they should. According to the 2017 Gallup State of the American Workplace, committed and engaged employees are 17% more productive, stay with their organization for 24-59% longer and have a 21% higher profitability than employees who are not engaged and report low commitment to their organizations.

    Recognition programs should not just be direct managers to employees. The not-so-new concept floating around many leadership and HR circles is peer-to-peer recognition. By having a recognition program that is multifaceted, not just peer-to-peer based or management recognition based, the responsibility for recognizing team members is spread around. Key recognitions should still come from company leaders and managers, but by building a program that includes shout-outs, day-today recognition from fellow employees, a company culture of support and appreciation can be developed and the weight of recognition does not just rest on one leaders shoulders.

  2. “We do not have the money to provide recognition to our team”

    Recognition does not have to be costly, it can be as simple as a thank you to a hardworking member of your team. That being said, it is widely agreed that the cost of retention of an employee is far less than replacing. A paper from the Center for American Progress determined that companies can expect to pay about one-fifth of a departing employees salary to replace them, depending on the employee’s skills and position, while Josh Bersin of Deloitte Consulting, LLP estimates the cost to be anywhere between “tens of thousands of dollars to 1.5-2X annual salary.” With these numbers, creating the time to start and actively participate in your organization’s recognition program is a no-brainer.

  3. I don’t know how to recognize my employees

    While this seems like the easiest excuse to refute, it can be the hardest to overcome. With more generations in the workplace than ever before, Traditionalist, Baby Boomers, Gen X, Gen Y (Millennials), and Gen Z, navigating what works best for each employee and the nuances of generational divide can be difficult. The Wall Street Journal cautions against following a blanket stereotype, while Kimberly Abel-Lanier, vice president and general manager of Maritz Workforce Solutions, advises organizations to reinvent their recognition strategy by considering their general motivations. Whatever your organization’s hurdles may be to creating a recognition strategy, sometimes the easiest way to find out how your employees would like to be recognized, is to ask.

  4. Who has the time?

    If leadership at some of the top companies in the world can send thank you notes and take the time to recognize their teams, you have time to provide recognition to your team. As Kevin Kruse of LEADx.org puts it; “increasing engagement takes minutes, not hours”. The truth is, everyone is busy, not just the company leaders. Set an example as a manager that recognition is important to your organization. There is time in your day to say a simple thank you to an employee that handled a tough account, give a shout-out to a member of your team that offered their time to help on an additional project, fill out a recognition form for an employee who took time out of their weekend to finish a project on a tight deadline. Make the time and see the results.  

Manager Responsibility is a key pillar of the RPI Best Practice Standards®. Learn more about the Standards here.

Gain more insights into building your recognition program and become a certified recognition professional through RPI’s Certified Recognition Professional® (CRP) program – four courses designed to guide you through the latest information and research on building a successful recognition program.

Tags:  employee retention  recognition  recognition program 

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Standard Success Stories: Kforce Recognition Strategy

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Tuesday, January 30, 2018
Updated: Monday, January 29, 2018
Untitled Document

Note: RPI’s Seven Best Practice Standards are the cornerstone of successful employee recognition and rewards programs. In 2018, we are taking a closer look at each of the seven standards and RPI members who have been recognized for their practice of those standards. In the first installment, we take a look at Recognition Strategy, and the award-winning way that Kforce practices this standard. The RPI Best Practice Awards are now open for nominations through February 1, 2018.

Kforce, a professional staffing firm based in Tampa, Florida, with more than 60 offices and 2,000 employees, was honored as Best in Class for Recognition Strategy in 2016 by RPI.

Recognition at Kforce is real. So real that they has an entire department dedicated to strategizing, implementing and evaluating recognition programs, contests, events and rewards. It’s all spelled out right in the Kforce Recognition and Engagement Mission Statement:

We want all Kforcers to feel recognized, inspired and valued. We will celebrate and share the Kforce culture of appreciation and performance (it’s what sets us apart).  By doing this, we create a strong, united and engaged Kforce Family.

Known as “Kforcers,” the company’s people have created a culture of recognition by constantly celebrating Great Results in a truly unique and informal fashion. Each office knows the Kforce art of celebration and recognition.

Day-to-day recognition is easy to see at Kforce. Their digital Snapshot feature illustrates this culture of recognition in real time. Associates simply submit a photo and caption that showcases the Kforce recognition culture and it will be posted front and center on their intranet. Hats Off is another informal example that happens all day, every day. This is a digital, peer-to-peer recognition program that’s also on their intranet and is accessible to everyone.  Kforcers are encouraged to make spontaneous recognition posts about their coworkers and partners, then the post is published on the intranet for all to see. Managers receive an email notifying them of their associates’ good deed.

Performance and milestone reports help fuel informal recognition and celebrations. Kforce has numerous ranking reports that are emailed on a monthly and quarterly basis to a select audience. These reports are highly anticipated and are used for interoffice contests and even firm-wide competitions and celebrations. Immediately after a report or ranking is emailed out, a barrage of emails is circulated recognizing those with top standings or improvements.

Formal programs keep Kforcers engaged and connected on a monthly and quarterly basis. The most well-known of these is the Performers’ Incentive Program which inspires competition and performance through new, exciting trip destinations each year. Formal qualifications and rankings are developed and communicated via email.  Ranking reports are monthly to show qualifiers their positions. Each year the destination changes to keep the program engaging and exciting. Mission: $2 Billion is the firm-wide campaign that engages associates in our business strategy, collective goals and advantages for the next few years. Kforce developed this theme and uses it for formal recognition programs such as the on-going Cup competition and Quarterly and Annual Awards.

Their formal milestone programs aim to further create a feeling of value and pride for those being recognized.  Kforce service awards recognize those celebrating a 5-, 10-, 15-, 20-, 25- or 30-year anniversary with a firm-wide email and a special desk memento. Their career milestone program is called Moving UP! and recognizes associates who have achieved notable growth in their career. Whether an official promotion (reported by HR) or a sales milestone (reported by Finance), the employees are recognized a monthly firm-wide email.

Whether day-to-day, formal or informal Kforcers are engaged within a strong culture of recognition. It is an obvious differentiator for the firm and the main reason they are all a part of the Kforce Family.

For more information on Kforce, the Chairman’s Awards and their success with Recognition Strategy, please visit the company website at: www.kforce.com.

Tags:  7 Best Practice Standards  recognition 

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Standard Success Stories: RBC’s Recognition Strategy

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Tuesday, January 9, 2018
Untitled Document

Note: RPI’s Seven Best Practice Standards are the cornerstone of successful employee recognition and rewards programs. In 2018, we are taking a closer look at each of the seven standards and RPI members who have been recognized for their practice of those standards. In the first installment, we take a look at Recognition Strategy, and the award-winning way that RBC practices this standard. The RPI Best Practice Awards nominations are now open for nominations through February 1, 2018.

RBC, based in Toronto, was a recipient of the Overall RPI Best Practice® Award in 2017, and is a shining example of how to do recognition strategy right. From their award-winning entry, they offer several samples of the ideas and actions behind their recognition strategy efforts.

All of RBC’s recognition and reward programs under the RBC Performance brand align with their Purpose, Vision and Values to become a leader in financial services wherever in the world they serve customers. That vision and those values help drive their recognition programs and are part of the criteria within the RBC Performance recognition and reward program.

RBC Performance, which is their flagship program, was launched in 1993 as a sales incentive points reward and recognition program and now serves over 75,000 employees. Among the core points of the program are:

  • Day-to-Day Recognition – RBC associates give and receive recognition to and from their peers and from retail branch managers and regional leaders on a regular basis.
  •  InstantThanks – RBC’s social recognition program permits employees so say thanks and send commendation comments and recognition for demonstrating our values and excellent customer service.
  • Branch Huddles – These happen before the bank door opens. Here customer service and product information is given. Managers and team members weave in recognition as often as they can.
  • Informal Recognition – RBC Performance is a comprehensive recognition system dedicated to improving RBC’s financial and service performance results.
  • RBC Performance Nominations and Awards – Employees can recognize individuals and teams who consistently go beyond expectations and make a difference in the business. RBC employees can nominate a colleague or team with RBC Performance’s online nomination feature. Nominations are based on RBC’s values and other key behaviors, and are expected to focus on outstanding performance in these categories. Managers select nominations based on merit and can award point values to send to the employee. The number of nominations and awards received contributes to selecting who attends the RBC Performance Conference.
  • Scratch ‘n Win Cards – Managers can give these cards for on-the-spot recognition. Employees virtually “scratch” a bar online to reveal a point value or the chance to be entered into a monthly draw.
  • Sales Campaigns – Managers in retail banking can recognize and reward employees and teams with points for achieving highest sales or service activities in any quarterly sales campaign.

The company also believes in more formal recognition, with a series of events and awards:

  • Leo Awards – This is RBC’s Academy-award-style celebration event. Employees who showcase the very best in sales, service or support are recognized at a special event during the RBC Performance Conference with “The Leo” Award. Regional leaders select Leo Award recipients from RBC Performance Conference recipients.
  • RBC Performance Conference – This is the best-of-the best annual conference for RBC’s top performers. Each region has a set number of eligible nominees to select. Quarterly Point Award winners are eligible candidates. Regional presidents and senior leaders choose conference attendees from across all roles. Conference winners are announced at each Regional Gala event. Each awardee receives a registration package to attend the Conference.
  • RBC Service Awards – Employees receive a choice of a gift award item on their milestone anniversary at two, five, 10, 15 years and in five-year increments up to 50-year level.

The results have not only been award from RPI, but recognition of RBC as one of the best places to work in Canada. For more information on RBC and their success with Recognition Strategy, please visit the company culture website at: https://www.rbc.com/careers/people-culture-awards.html

Tags:  employee engagement  formal recognition  RBC  recognition  recognition strategies  RPI 7 Best Practices  Strategy  success stories  Toronto 

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Charlotte Blank: Knowing Human Behavior Aids In Recognition Efforts

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Monday, August 21, 2017

We are all unique individuals, with our own tastes and preferences and voices. But a study of human behavior shows that people are remarkably similar in their ways of reacting to certain stimuli. Knowing those similarities and using them in developing recognition and rewards can greatly benefit your organization.

That was the primary message conveyed by Charlotte Blank, chief behavioral officer of Maritz, in a recent webinar hosted by RPI. Blank is a highly-regarded expert and speaker who leads Maritz’s practice of behavioral science and innovation through expert applications of social psychology and behavioral economics. Her passion is exploring the truths about human nature and discovering what “makes us tick.”

She began with a study where people were asked to complete a complicated set of tasks on paper – a lengthy and time-consuming effort, for which they were compensated with a decreasing amount of cash each round. The researchers studied how long the workers would persist, before giving up the task. Upon completion of the tasks, they were told to turn their paper in to an instructor at the front of the room. The instructor reacted to the papers being turned in one of three ways:

  • with a simple nod of acknowledgement
  • with no reaction at all
  • by dropping the completed paper into a shredder

Somewhat predictably, the subjects whose papers were shredded were the first to give up. Those whose work was ignored, came in a close second. Interestingly, those whose work was acknowledged with a simple nod of the head persisted much longer than did those who had been ignored, or those who had seen their papers shredded. The lesson, Blank said, is that well beyond compensation, acknowledgement matters, and gives people’s work a sense of meaning. Even a simple nod goes a long way.

The webinar explored important questions, like what makes someone take the time to recognize another’s efforts? Why is this so important? How can firms create a culture of gratitude and recognition?

The scientific study of human behavior reveals fascinating insights into the motivation of recognition – and surprisingly simple tactics to nudge behaviors that contribute to this virtuous cycle. A huge part of Blank’s work is to learn how taking a scientific approach to recognition can enhance employee engagement in the workplace.

For example, it’s human nature that most people are delighted by receiving an unexpected gift. Studies in the workplace have shown that gifts can be as efficient a tool as adding another worker in terms of boosting productivity. If part of a worker’s payment for a job is framed as an unanticipated gift, it predictably boost output and job satisfaction.

Blank also espouses the power of the nudge – a small change to the environment that can have positive outside effects on behavior. Among the tactics she advocates to make a positive change include:

  • Using image-based vision statements. For example, an abstract notion like “delight our customers” is less powerful than an image-based statement like “put a smile on every child’s face.”
  • Operational transparency. People better understand the value of something if they see the work and the steps that are taken on the way to the finished product. An example of this is restaurants that have a window into the kitchen, so diners can see the steps being taken to create a meal, and better understand the value of it.
  • Make recognition a social norm. Behavior studies show that often people like to conform. So for example, a hotel room sign asking people to re-use their towels is less effective than a sign stating, “Most guests staying in this room re-use their towels.” If we feel similar to others, we are more compelled to do what others do.

With years of research behind her, Blank has much more to offer and share on the topic. Her most recent webinar and additional contributions she has made to the field of study are available for RPI members at www.recognition.org.

Tags:  Charlotte Blank  Maritz  recognition 

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RPI Success Stories: CalSTRS

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Established more than a century ago, when much of the Golden State was still the nation’s unexplored frontier, the California State Teachers’ Retirement System (CalSTRS) has grown to serve more than 900,000 educators in the nation’s most populous state. As of 2017, CalSTRS is the largest teachers’ retirement fund in the nation, providing retirement, disability and survivor benefits for educators who cover every level of schooling from pre-Kindergarten to community college.

With a portfolio worth nearly $200 billion, CalSTRS is the 11th-largest public pension fund in the world. It’s also a great place to work as evidenced by CalSTRS receiving the 2012 Best Overall Program award by RPI. CalSTRS, headquartered in West Sacramento, Calif., receives honors like that one due in part to successful employee recognition programs based on the Seven Best Practice Standards.

Assessment

Their journey to better employee recognition began in 2008 when CalSTRS made a commitment to creating a culture of recognition. Part of their employee survey is devoted to recognition questions. They also did focus groups and spot surveys to determine recognition preferences and which existing programs to keep.

As a result, they transformed highly-valued programs that dealt with internal and external customer service, yet kept the personalized elements that staff and managers found meaningful (example: balloon deliveries to an employee’s work location).

The Recognition Design Teams saw the need to reinforce Core Values, so they designed a specific informal program to recognize the desired behaviors and actions.

Recognition Strategy

Through extensive benchmarking with private and public-sector industry leaders, internal surveys and the efforts to two employee design teams, CalSTRS established a thriving culture of appreciation with active use of seven recognition programs within the strategic recognition platform.

Virtuosity – CalSTRS Powered by You

The CalSTRS Employee Recognition Program theme, Virtuosity, was developed to support and enhance the CalSTRS brand, and specifically to communicate appreciation to the staff for their valuable work.

From their own materials:

Vision – Our culture of appreciation powers a thriving workplace where each person is valued.
Mission – We design and deliver fully integrated recognition programs, processes and tools that support our Strategic Business Objective 4.2: being a destination employer, as well as our Balanced Score Card strategic initiatives.


The CalSTRS case study is included in the course materials in the Certified Recognition Professional program. For more information on CRP certification, please visit http://www.recognition.org/?page=crp_certification. To view a webinar on CRP, click here.

Tags:  culture  recognition  recognition strategy 

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We Need to Get Inside People's Heads to Fully Appreciate Recognition, Says Author

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Friday, April 28, 2017
There’s a little rush of a chemical called dopamine inside the brain when you take a bite of chocolate, or when you hit on a winner at the card table, or when a big fish bites your line. It's the neurobiological mechanism behind why we find something pleasurable. It’s hard science.

Similarly, when you are recognized for good work by your employer or receive an incentive for a job well done, you get that same jolt of pleasure in your brain. That’s part of the message keynote speaker Rodd Wagner will deliver at the RPI Annual Conference in Fort Lauderdale. His presentation, entitled “Inside the Mind of an Employee: The Good, the Bad and the Neurobiology,” explores the science behind employee reciprocity and how good companies use that science to their benefit.

Wagner is the New York Times bestselling author of Widgets: The 12 New Rules for Managing Your Employees As If They're Real People. He’s also a regular columnist in Forbes, and Vice President of Employee Engagement Strategy at BI Worldwide, based in Minnesota.

“You could make the case that we don’t need to know what's going on inside people’s brains,” said Wagner. “I can prove survey research and performance data that there’s every reason to ensure a company recognizes solid performance. I don’t need the brain science.”

Yet for years, Wagner says employee engagement has been considered a “soft science” because it could not be observed in the same way as operations, accounting, or one of the more traditionally concrete aspects of running a business. He believes sharing the evidence of what predictably happens inside employees’ brains has the potential to help skeptical executives understand how the science of motivation is just as reliable as any of the other disciplines.

“Getting recognized at work tickles something in a part of the human brain, and people who are happiest reciprocate that emotion with dedication. Humans are very reciprocal creatures,” he said. “We find that when companies take a genuine interest in keeping people happy, those people will take a genuine interest in making the company succeed.”

Wagner enjoys doing a little myth-busting in his columns and speeches. One he has taken on lately is the widely circulated idea that a minority of people are “engaged” at work. Engagement could be better, he said, but “there is no crisis.”

“Most people at least like their jobs, and some love them,” Wagner said.

He also argues with current assertions in the engagement industry that employee happiness is not the right goal for a business.

“Happiness remains very important to employees,” he said. “It’s still the overriding reason people take a job and stay in a job. Any properly fielded and analyzed research shows the pattern.”

Wagner frequently speaks on similar topics to business and industry groups around the country. While some of his keynote will be taken from his most recent book, he will also be showing first at RPI new analyses from the most recent of BI Worldwide's annual studies on employee’s relationships with their employers.

Among the lines on inquiry in his most recent study is what psychologists call “theory of mind.”

“It’s a uniquely human characteristic to be able to estimate what the other person is thinking or intends, and it’s turning out to be an intriguing area for engagement research,” Wagner said. In his most recent study, Wagner asked people three questions about their companies' intentions, among them the statement, “My employer is seeking to make me happy.”

“Now, of course, people don’t know for certain what their leaders’ intentions are, but it is fascinating to me how predictive these types of core motivation questions are of a person's commitment to the company,” said the author. “Employees are most driven to perform when they believe the company is not investing them just because of the potential return, but because they feel a moral obligation to their people.”

Wagner wrote about the results in a recent Forbes column, where he advised employees to calibrate their commitment to their companies with those core intentions of the firm. “Organizations often deliver similar perks and benefits for different reasons.” he wrote. “A mismatch between your company’s intentions and yours can hurt your career.”

For more information on Wagner’s keynote and a full schedule, please visit the conference web site.

Tags:  recognition  Recognition Research  recognition strategy  Research Studies  Trends 

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Recognition, the Southwest Way

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Monday, April 3, 2017

Known for innovation in plane boarding and creating a lively, fun atmosphere, Southwest Airlines has earned a reputation as an innovator. While preferred seating and other “normal” tenants of the air travel world are sought by some travelers, Southwest has found that a vast number of their passengers just want to be treated equitably -- and the same is being said for employees.  The airline is taking recognition to a new level by making sure all employees are treated fairly and with equity. 

The goal began inside the company’s Texas headquarters when it comes to recognizing great work among employees – a successful program that Tonda Ferguson has had a vital role in running during her 30-plus years with the airline. Today, she can admit that at one time there was very little equity in the program, which was a problem.

“It varied so much. In one department a top employee would be rewarded with a free car, and in another they’d get a free lunch,” Ferguson recalled. “Employees want equity in the workplace. It all needs to feed into one system.”

Southwest undertook a large-scale revamp of its employee recognition system, and emerged with two programs that have proven to be both popular and successful. “SWAG” is an acronym for Southwest Airlines Gratitude” and it’s a program by which employees can earn points which can be applied for shopping sprees and space available airline seats that can be given to friends. It was an important perk for airline employees who are used to flight privileges. The SWAG system allows points to be accumulated so employees can fly with friends, family and others, and they can even get a confirmed seat.

Ferguson also runs the bigger program, called “Kick Tail” which rewards employees for the company meeting goals, and furthering its legendary culture of customer service.  It’s a rapid reward for things like the company ranking atop airline service surveys or being the top on-time airline.

“It shows how you can take company goals and turn them into an employee recognition effort,” she said. “Employees really love the program.”

Recognizing that getting an award in front of your co-workers is in itself a reward, Southwest also directs the Kick Tail Prize Patrol, which makes a big show of surprising employees with an award, complete with balloons and cheers, that gets noticed by others. They’ve even been known to have the company CEO show up to hand out cash rewards for good work.

“Sometimes companies struggle to make it fun, but now everyone is pulling in the same direction,” said Ferguson, who will offer a presentation on the Southwest way of employee recognition at the upcoming RPI Annual Conference in late April. “Now we can move quickly, and when people are living the Southwest way, we can recognize them at the drop of a hat.”

Tags:  recognition  southwest 

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Study: Employee Satisfaction Success Comes from Playing the Long Game

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Tuesday, March 14, 2017

It’s easy to get a quick burst from a strong cup of coffee or an energy drink. And then there’s the inevitable crash. The better, tougher, way to be a more energetic person is to work on it over time, with nutrition, exercise and rest, which lead to long-term energy and health.

According to a recent piece in the Harvard Business Review, it works the same way with employee engagement. It’s easy, exciting, and mostly useless, to get a short burst in productivity and employee satisfaction through an incentive. But long-term success in employee engagement comes from taking the extended view in the recognition field and investing for the long term as well.

Why the Millions We Spend on Employee Engagement Buy Us So Little” is the provocative title of Jacob Morgan’s study, and he’s played the long game in doing extensive research, interviewing 150 psychologists, economists and business leaders throughout the globe. His hypothesis is that spending countless dollars on employee engagement efforts is not money well spent if you’re focused on the short term. When an employee perk is introduced, he writes, it has the same effect as an adrenaline shot. Employee satisfaction jumps up, briefly, then settles back down just as quickly, as employees subconsciously wait for the next incentive.

Taking a long look at the workplace is well-traveled territory for Morgan, who is the author of three books on organizations, employment and employees. He has an entire website (www.thefutureorganization.com) dedicated to the topic.

In his data analysis, Morgan finds that companies focused on long-term employee engagement have the most long-term success. One example he cites is Adobe, which employs an executive vice president dedicated to customer and employee experience, and has made a significant investment in programs that facilitate real-time employee feedback. Other examples cited in Morgan’s study include offices with multiple workplace floor plans to accommodate differing work styles and preferences. One company, Airbnb, constantly experiments with differing office layouts and floor plans, and employees are given a budget to design and build their own conference spaces.

Short-term efforts are easy and enjoyable, but the companies with the most success in the employee engagement realm are playing the long game.

Tags:  recognition 

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Member spotlight: Recognition Means the Royal Treatment at RBC

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Monday, March 6, 2017

Employee appreciation is a big deal throughout the Royal Bank of Canada’s vast network that employs more than 80,000 people in 35-plus countries, but if you stop by their Toronto headquarters on Employee Appreciation Day, you won’t see any balloons or party favors. That’s by design.

“We do employee recognition every day of the year,” said Steve Richardson, who has led the recognition team at RBC for the past 25 years and is a past president of RPI.

The renowned recognition program at RBC has changed greatly over the past three decades or more. It was solely focused on incentives at one time – sell a set number of credit cards and you would get a new barbeque grill, for example. That changed for a number of reasons, not least of which was that non-sales staff deserved incentives and recognition as well.

“We still have the toasters and barbeques, but it’s evolved into a full recognition vehicle,” Richardson said, adding that informal recognition is as important in their corporate culture as material rewards. “It’s more important to get recognition right than to have someone receive something.”

Richardson’s work includes not only running the recognition program, which utilizes a well-developed peer-to-peer program, but training managers on correct and effective ways to use recognition. RBC has found that such training leads to positive results not only in terms of employee retention and satisfaction, but even in sales numbers.

What works and what can be improved in the employee appreciation realm has produced plenty of learn-on-the-job moments. For example, a practical way to deliver material rewards became a win-win for the company. If RBC employees were getting a toaster, for example, the company would have the item delivered to the office, knowing that the recipient would be there to sign for them. This practice came with an added bonus.

“It became a real recognition moment, as co-workers would see and acknowledge the person being recognized, congratulate them and add to the recognition,” Richardson said. From that fortunate circumstance, a company practice was born.

RBC also practices informal “instant thanks,” and has a system in place where managers and peers can acknowledge good works in a matter of seconds. There are up to 15,000 of those sent every month across the company, which leads to positive results.

The fiscal side of things never goes unnoticed, especially among one of Canada’s largest banks. Richardson admitted that a competitive ‎financial compensation program goes hand in hand with an effective employee recognition program to retain top talent.

“But recognition is what can take people higher,” he said.

Tags:  recognition 

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RPI Certified Recognition Professional® Courses Now Available Online

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Friday, February 10, 2017

You don’t think of February as back to school time. But in the world of employee recognition, it’s that time to sharpen your pencils and meet your new teacher.

That’s our excited way of announcing that all of the Recognition Professionals International Certified Recognition Professional® (CRP) courses are now available online. The news went out via a world-wide press release.

“This is an exciting time for RPI and for the many world-wide employee recognition professionals seeking to become certified in the trade, with all of our valuable courses now available in both online formats as well as in-person at RPI’s annual conference,” said Rita Maehling, CRP, RPI board member and chair of RPI’s Learning Action Team. “We know all effective recognition programs involve assessment, strategy, implementation and review. The CRP program is designed to be a guide through this process, for the benefit of organizations and also business providers everywhere.”

The goals of the CRP program are straightforward, and include:

  • To raise the professional standards of those engaged in employee recognition.
  • To encourage continuing education for professional development.
  • To encourage self-development by offering guidelines for achievement in the employee recognition profession.
  • To identify and award special recognition to those persons who have demonstrated a comprehensive knowledge of those principles and practices of employee recognition and also laws governing and affecting employee recognition.

It’s an extensive educational experience. CRP designation consists of four courses and exams that can either all be taken online, at the 2017 RPI Annual Conference (April 30-May 2 in Fort Lauderdale, FL), or a combination of both. All CRP candidates receive the comprehensive learning guide which includes valuable templates, worksheets and case studies that can be utilized to implement a recognition program based on RPI’s Seven Best Practices. Each course is $595 for practitioner premium/business partner members; $750 for basic RPI members and $795 for non-members.

The driving idea behind CRP designation is to demonstrate to leaders, peers and clients a commitment to continuing education and excellence in the discipline of workforce recognition. RPI’s program is renowned as the most comprehensive, authoritative resource for individuals seeking to develop and test their skills and knowledge within this field.

RPI offers a webinar featuring testimonials from several CRP graduates with plenty more information. And of course, details are available on the RPI web site.

So listen closely – the school bell is ringing in the world of employee recognition.

Tags:  CRP  recognition 

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