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Recognition in The Real World
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How to Engage with Employees Remotely

Posted By Ava Ewald, Thursday, March 19, 2020
Updated: Thursday, March 19, 2020

In an increasingly flexible and technologically advanced professional world, working remotely is becoming typical of the modern workplace. However, COVID-19 has made working remotely more common for organizations that haven’t done this previously across their entire workforce. RPI strives to educate and empower employers to recognize employees wherever they may be, leading to better employee engagement.

 

Lisa Massiello, CRP, is the Design & Governance Manager on Wells Fargo's Enterprise Recognition team and past RPI President. Her company has had virtual staff in place for years, and Lisa shared some relevant insight based on her experience making sure that employees feel recognized remotely, too.

 

1.      Hold check-in meetings

Even if it is a quick 30-minute Zoom meeting about how everyone’s weekend was, that connection is more important than ever when employees are remote. It can be hard to maintain company culture remotely, but meetings like these can reinforce the feeling of community.

2.      Send a quick note

Send a quick email to check in, say thank you, or ask how someone is doing. Try to mimic little check-ins you may do in the office. This can give space for employees to give feedback or ideas.

3.      Emphasize listening

Listening to others becomes much more difficult when meetings are done remotely. Try to give every employee in an online meeting the opportunity to speak so everyone feels heard. It Is more important than ever for employees to be engaged in meetings.

 

Do you have ideas for how to make remote work more effective? Email info@recognition.org and we’ll share with the community.

 

If you are a premium member or business partner of RPI, you have full access to our Learning Center with over 60 on-demand webinars, you receive member rates on our virtual conference offerings from last year and you get discounts on CRP courses online. We will continue to develop online resources for our community; the infrastructure is already in place to serve our community online, year-round.

 

Check Out RPI’s Online Resources including our NEW Resource Center - https://www.recognition.org/page/resource-hub  

Blog with Weekly Posts - https://www.recognition.org/blogpost/1286329/Recognition-in-The-Real-World

 

Get FREE Access to Chester Elton’s Online Course in March

For the month of March, we are offering you FREE access ($35 value) to our online course from Chester Elton on All In: How Great Leaders Develop a Culture of Belief and Deliver Big Results.

Teaming up with research giant Towers Watson, #1 bestselling author Chester Elton presents the findings of an unprecedented 300,000-person study conducted in the worst of the recession for his book All In. Based on this breakthrough research and his extensive consulting experience with a who’s-who of successful organizations, he presents a simple roadmap that all managers can follow to create a high-achieving culture in their own teams where employees are engaged, enabled and energized.

Go here https://rpi.ce21.com/item/all-great-leaders-develop-culture-belief-deliver-big-results-308997 and use ThankYouMarch as the promo code for access for the month of March only!

 

Become an RPI member! Learn how here.

To learn more about RPI’s 7 Best Practice Standards, click here.

 

Upcoming Webinars

RPI's March 26, 2020 Webinar - Register Here
Webinar: Increase Your Emotional Intelligence (EQ)
Presented by Anne Loehr, Center for Human Capital Innovation

RPI's April 23, 2020 Webinar - Register Here
Webinar: Why Most Employee Recognition Programs Don’t Work (and What to Do About It)
Presented by Dr. Paul White

RPI's June 25, 2020 Webinar - Register Here
Webinar: Five Trends Shaping the Employee Experience
Presented by Theresa Harkins CRP, Inspirus, LLC

RPI's September 24, 2020 Webinar - Register Here
Webinar: Generation "THEM": Managing a Multi-Generational Workforce
Presented by Kristin Scroggin, genWHY Communications

RPI's November 19, 2020 Webinar - Register Here
Webinar: Resolving Conflict
Presented by Phillip Duncan, Experience Global

 

 

Tags:  engagement  recognition  remote work 

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How to Reward Consistently

Posted By Ava Ewald, Thursday, March 19, 2020
RPI developed its 7 Best Practice Standards® based on academic research, academic knowledge and years of experience in the field. These standards will help you develop and refine your recognition program. Standard 1 is recognition strategy and standard 2 is management responsibility. These standards are very important when developing your program. Read below to find out how you can make rewarding employees a consistent habit.

 

In Harvard Business Review’s podcast, IdeaCast, Charles Duhigg, author of The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business, explained the importance of habits in the workplace. “About 40% to 45% of what we do every day sort of feels like a decision, but it’s actually habit,” he said.

 

So how can we harness the power of habits to help reward employees? Here are a few thoughts:

 

Understand how a habit is formed

Duhigg explains that there are three parts to a habit. First, the cue that initiates the action, then a routine and finally a reward for the action. In the context of rewarding employees, for example, this might be wanting to start or improve your recognition program, rewarding an employee every week, and then seeing your employee(s) become more engaged with their work.

 

Make a plan

It is far easier to achieve something if you have an end-goal in mind. Think through what changes you would like to see as a result of rewards in your organization. This will help you develop a plan. The Hartford encourages tying company goals into this plan so that you can reward behavior you would like to continue to see in the organization.

 

Measure

Incentive Magazine explains that you need to be consistent in order to measure progress. Measurement is part of every step in RPI’s 7 Best Practice Standards to ensure that the process can be refined to be even more successful.

 

Tips:

·         Get employees involved in rewarding their peers. This takes some of the heavy lifting off of you and it can add more passion into the program.

·         Make rewards personal. Involve family or friends if you can and/or keep track of your employees’ likes and dislikes so you can reward them with something they will truly appreciate.

 

Become a Certified Recognition Professional! Learn more here.

 

To learn more about RPI’s 7 Best Practice Standards, click here.

 

Register for RPI’s Annual Conference here.

 

 

Tags:  engagement  rewards  RPI 7 Best Practices 

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How to Make a Habit of Recognition

Posted By Ava Ewald, Tuesday, February 18, 2020
Updated: Tuesday, February 18, 2020

RPI is at the forefront of recognition practices. RPI’s 7 Best Practices were developed based on a wealth of knowledge, research and experiences to educate about how to create a successful recognition program. Standard 1 is recognition strategy and Standard 2 is management responsibility. Both standards are crucial in developing a program to help your employees become more engaged. Read below to find out how you can make a habit of recognition.

 

According to Psychology Today, habit formation “is the process by which new behaviors become automatic.” This can be good or bad. Things like smoking, drinking or eating too much junk food in the middle of the night can be habits you want to break, but good habits are what you want to build.

 

Making a habit of recognizing your employees will build a positive culture and foster engagement. Forbes and Non-Desk Matters offer some tips on how you can achieve this with your team.

 

1)      Acknowledge good things when you see them

Make a habit of vocalizing your appreciation for nearly everything. If you like what you see, make sure that whoever is involved is aware. This not only motivates employees and makes them feel appreciated, but also reinforces good behaviors and company values.

·         Encourage others to do this as well. Peer-to-peer recognition helps bond your team and foster a positive work culture.

2)      Set daily goals

Setting goals is key to any outcome you want to achieve, but make sure you can handle them every day. This will look different for every workplace. For example, if you are a particularly busy manager, you could make it a goal to simply tell three employees a day why you appreciate them. If you have employees who often work at home, make it a goal to send out one card a week to an employee’s home.

·         Set aside time every day to focus on recognition. Even if it is 5 minutes of walking around the office and saying good morning to your employees.

3)      Take one employee out to coffee every week

This is a casual, relaxing way to recognize an employee. Run out for half an hour for a fun mid-day break. You will get to know that employee better and give them a chance to talk to you in a more casual setting.

4)      Make it clear that you are open to feedback

It can be intimidating for employees to tell a manager what they think. Make it clear you are open to your employees’ thoughts and feedback. Ask them what they think or how they would change the way things operate.

·         Find creative ways to listen to your employees. Have “office hours” where your door is open to anyone who wants to chat.

5)      Get organized

Keep a list of who you have recognized recently and/or a calendar of employees’ birthdays, anniversaries, etc., so that you stay on top of your recognition strategy.

 

Remember, like anything, the more you practice, the better you get!

 

 

To learn more about RPI’s 7 Best Practices click here.

Check out our new resource hub here!

 

 

Tags:  engagement  habit  recognition  RPI 7 Best Practices 

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How to Write a Recognition Questionnaire and Recognize Employees the Way They Want

Posted By Ava Ewald, Thursday, February 13, 2020
Updated: Thursday, February 13, 2020

RPI developed their 7 RPI Best Practice Standards® based on expert knowledge, academic literature and a wealth of experience in growing and developing successful recognition programs. Standard 1 is Recognition Strategy and Standard 2 is management responsibility. These two standards are especially important to consider when developing your strategy for recognition. Below is how you can craft a recognition questionnaire to ensure that you are recognizing employees the way they prefer.

 

Scott Russell, Director of Engagement Strategies at C.A. Short Company and Executive Vice President of RPI discussed the importance of tailoring your recognition strategy to each employee in the Essential Recognition Leaders for webinar. He suggested that one great way to do this is through a recognition questionnaire.

 

What is an employee recognition questionnaire?

Texas A&M University published their recognition questionnaire and stated that their purpose for the form is to “assist supervisors and managers with their employee recognition efforts.” Essentially, the goal of the form is to gather your employees’ preferences on how they like to be recognized.

 

Why are they helpful?

Having your employees fill out a form with foods/drinks/activities they like and how they like to be recognized means that you gather that information quickly, as figuring out these preferences through conversation would take a significant amount of time. You can then keep this information on file and refer back to it whenever you need. These forms may also be a form of recognition on their own- allowing your employees to feel cared for and heard.

 

What to include:

1)      Important dates/anniversaries. Make sure that there are sections of the questionnaire for their work anniversary, marriage anniversary, birthday or any other important dates they want you to know about. Celebrate these days with them.

2)      What they enjoy being recognized for. Maybe one employee has a hard time participating in team projects and would like to be recognized for working with others. Every employee is proud of different aspects of their work. Make sure you celebrate with them when they accomplish something that challenges them.

3)      How they like to be recognized. Some employees love being recognized in front of the whole team, while other more introverted employees may not enjoy this as much. For rewards, some may value opportunities such as face time with a manager or paid time off. Make sure that you take the time to recognize each employee how they like being recognized to show that you care that much more.

4)      Favorites. This is the fun part. Make sure to collect employees’ favorite snack, candy, restaurant, flower, store, dessert, sports team, etc. Having this information on file for each employee will make recognizing them much more fun and personal.

5)      Allergies/restrictions. Bringing in a team lunch from a local barbecue place is not fun for the employee who does not eat meat. If you have the information available, you can make sure that a group reward is equally fun for everyone.

6)      Additional comments. Of course, leaving an empty space for additional comments allows employees to voice thoughts and ideas.

7)      Recognition log. Put in a log on the back of the document or keep it separately so you can keep track of who has been recognized and when.

 

Using your employees’ answers:

Once you have collected the questionnaires, take the time to look through them on your own or with your recognition team. Consider planning out when you will recognize certain employees and any supplies you will need for that event/employee. Come up with a short-list of restaurants that suit everyone that can be catered.

 

To learn more about RPI’s 7 Best Practices click here.

Check out our new resource hub here!

To gain access to Essential Recognition for Leaders with Scott Russell and Theresa Harkins, click here.

 

 

Tags:  employee recognition  engagement  RPI 7 Best Practices  survey 

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A Simple Breakdown of Recognition

Posted By Ava Ewald, Thursday, February 13, 2020
Updated: Friday, February 14, 2020

RPI’s mission is to educate about recognition. Its 7 Best Practice Standards® lay out the framework to successfully implement recognition practices in your organization. Standard 1 of the 7 Best Practice Standards is Recognition Strategy. In order to form your strategy, read below for a simple breakdown of what recognition is.

 

According to Human Resources Director magazine, “Strategic employee recognition is when appreciation is shown for an action that has helped improve the employee or customer experience in a way that supports the organization’s values, purpose or objectives.” To better understand recognition, we will break it down into what it is and what it is not.

 

What it is:

1)      Consistent

Forbes explains that a well-build recognition program should make engaging in recognition simple, so it does not take much effort to keep it going when things get busy. Consistency is key to building a great recognition program as it becomes engrained into the company culture. It also tells your employees that they should expect recognition when they are on the right track.

2)      Individualized

Harvard Business Review suggests that recognition should be tailored to the person you are recognizing. Some people like being recognized in from if their peers, while some prefer a quiet “thank you” at their desk. It may also help to know your employees’ preferences on things like restaurants and activities. Consider sending out an appreciation form like this one from Texas A&M University to your employees to gather this information and have it on file.

3)      Reflective of Organizational Values

HBR says that recognition is the perfect opportunity to reinforce the values of your organization. Identify what behaviors represent those values and make a point of consistently recognizing them. Praising these behaviors often communicates company values to employees better than newsletters and speeches.

 

What it is not:

1)      Vague

According to Forbes, it is important to be specific when recognizing someone. While employee of the month awards are great, they fail to address what the employee specifically did right. When you begin to recognize specific behaviors, you will see them repeat.

2)      Passive

HBR gives the example of a manager who gives out a $25 restaurant gift card every quarter. While consistent, the manager is failing to be active in recognition. Take some time to recognize each person or team differently based on what they like and what they have done to warrant praise. It should always feel genuine.

3)      Difficult

If you do not have much time to spare, recognition can be as simple as “Hey Jenn, thanks so much for going the extra mile for our client this morning.” It is all about these genuine interactions between you and your employees.

 

To learn more about RPI’s 7 Best Practices click here.

Check out our new resource hub here!

 

Tags:  engagement  recognition  RPI 7 Best Practices 

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Practical Ways to Implement Engagement Practices Today

Posted By Ava Ewald, Thursday, February 13, 2020
Updated: Thursday, February 13, 2020

RPI is at the forefront of employee engagement practices, developing the 7 RPI Best Practice Standards® based a wealth of knowledge collected from academics, industry leaders and conferences. These standards will help in growing your organization’s recognition program.

Standard 1 is Recognition Strategy and the second is management responsibility. Both are key in growing your recognition program and driving engagement. Below are some simple ways you can grow engagement today.

1.      Emphasize your company’s purpose

Why does your company exist? This is a great question to revisit to reinforce your company’s mission. It also defines purpose, which according to Forbes helps employees perform better because they are confident in what the mission is and how they contribute to it.

·         Harvard Business Review suggests envisioning an inspired workplace. Think about how to connect your employees to the overall mission and identify concrete actions you can take to get them there. Finding a positive example of an inspired employee can demonstrate what you are looking for.

·         Make sure your employees know and understand why your company exists and continue to reinforce the message. This can be done in a weekly newsletter, repeated frequently in meetings or posted in highly trafficked areas of the office.

·         Lean into your inspired staff. Have them help you spread your message and give you feedback on what more you could do.

2.      Set Goals for your teams

A study done by Harvard Business Review Analytic Services found that both individual and organizational goals are strongly tied to an organization’s success. Setting goals with your teams reinforces your mission and drives engagement.

·         A Gallup study found that only 13% of employees believe that their employers set clear goals, which often leads to low engagement. However, Gallup also found that 72% of employees that had goals communicated to them are engaged.

·         On the Clear Review Blog, Stuart Hearn wrote that collaborative goals are crucial when fostering engagement. Setting individual goals shows that one employee contributes to the goals and purpose of the company.

·         Hearn also suggests revisiting goals. Check in with your employees and make sure they feel comfortable with their work as they move toward the goal. Communication is key.

3.      Create an engagement survey

One of the best ways to foster engagement is simply to ask! Create an engagement survey in order to analyze and measure engagement in your office.

·         Survey Monkey posted on their websitebusinesses not only should measure employee engagement—they can’t afford not to.” Engagement translates to more effort, happiness, and profit. Measuring engagement via a survey allows you to track your progress.

·         Bamboo HR recommends against using yes/no questions in your surveys. Give your employees the space to express how they feel about the company and how it works.

·         There are plenty of templates online, so you do not even need to take the time to write your own survey. For example, check out the survey by Bamboo HR here.

4.      Come up with a routine for consistent recognition

We know recognition is a key factor in employee engagement and building it into a regular routine will help you create an even more positive, engaged company culture.

·         Andre Janus, CEO of Cristaux International suggests that employers are missing key opportunities to recognize their employees if they do not do it on a daily basis. Find little things to recognize your employees for each day.

·         Janus recommends adding recognition to your daily to-do list as it should be just as important as any other business task. This could be as simple as a tweet or Facebook post about a top performer or a drop-in chat at an employee’s desk.

·         Set recognition goals for yourself. For example, one could decide to recognize three employees a day. As we know, setting goals are key to producing results. Make recognition one of your goals and watch the engagement that follows!

 

 

To learn more about RPI’s 7 Best Practices click here.

Check out our new resource hub here!

 

 

Tags:  employee engagement  engagement  practices  recognition  RPI 7 Best Practices  strategy 

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Shuck: EVP explores the optimal way to recognize employees

Posted By By Jess Myers, RPI, Wednesday, November 15, 2017
Untitled Document

If you want to win football games, it’s simple. Just look at what Tom Brady does, and do that. If you want to make money, study what Warren Buffet does, and copy it.

If only life worked that way. It does not.

In his recent webinar hosted by RPI, noted recognition expert and researcher Brad Shuck, PhD, notes that copying the practices of what other successful companies have done to reward and recognize employees doesn’t always work. Your efforts are more successful when they are rooted in principles, not practices.

“Recognition is not about parties or casual Fridays, it is an underlying message of value that tells people they matter,” said Shuck, who is an associate professor of human resources and organization development at the University of Louisville.

In his new RPI-sponsored webinar, entitled “New Rules of Recognition: Moments You Can Leverage,” Shuck tells his audience that successful recognition is less about individual initiatives and more about creating a strong winning workplace culture that can be sustained over time.

“There are lots of ways to recognize employees, but what are the optimal ways to do it?,” he asks early in the presentation, then proceeds to answer his own question.

Shuck believes strongly in the concept of Employee Value Proposition (EVP), which asks why a talented person would choose to work in a given workplace. EVP puts the responsibility on the employer, not the employee, and it strongly encourages not only getting talented people in the door, but keeping them engaged once they are in the door.

He states some important numbers related to EVP, noting that 93 percent of employees who feel recognized and appreciated say they will go above and beyond on behalf of their employer and 91 percent are unlikely to leave.

“EVP breeds and fosters creativity, and encourages employees to give their best ideas,” he said. And creativity is at the heart of his call for a principle-based strategy around employee recognition. It’s easy to look at a renowned company like Google, which famously offers employees three meals per day and has offices with rooms for gaming and napping, but that model is not one that every office can easily or practically replicate.

By objectifying the practices of other companies, Shuck feels you may miss the human element, hence his call for focusing more on principles and establishment of organizational culture rather than focusing on the practices that others use to attract and retain good people.

The full webinar is available free to RPI members in the RPI Learning Center. For more of Dr. Shuck’s insights, his Twitter handle is @drbshuck.

Tags:  culture  engagement  human resources  organization development  recognition principles  recognition research  Shuck  talent development 

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Business Case Data Shows Employee Recognition Value

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Monday, June 5, 2017
Small Doses Archive

There are many recent studies that show the impact of highly-engaged employees to the organization, and the impact recognition has to increasing engagement. You need this data when building your business case for recognition.

Here are a few examples:

Gallup Employee Engagement Study – July 2015

  • “Gallup categorizes workers as ‘engaged’ based on their ratings of key workplace elements that predict important organizational performance outcomes. Engaged employees are involved in, enthusiastic about and committed to their work.”
  • “Employee engagement is directly influenced by their managers’ engagement.”
  • “The percentage of U.S. workers engaged in their job continued to hold steady at 31.9%...but is higher than it was in 2011-13.”

Fortune’s Best Companies to Work For shows over two times better stock returns than the general market.

The Ultimate Guide to Employee Recognition by Achievers

  • Engaged employees perform 20% better and are 87% less likely to leave their organization.
  • Organizations with high engagement rates are 78% more productive and 40% more profitable than those organizations with low levels of engagement.
  • 80% of employees stated recognition is a strong motivator of work performance and 70% stated they would work harder with continuous recognition.

Internal Business Case

Obviously there are numerous studies supporting the value of recognition to the bottom line. Sometimes, it is even more powerful to have a study inside your organization.

If you measure employee engagement, or some other type of assessment that looks at how willing an employee is to spend extra time and effort, if they speak positively about the organization and if they say good things about your organization, you can use that as a beginning point.

Approach:

  • Results-neutral…take an unbiased view of the outcome. Understand the relevance of the engagement measure.
  • “So what?”…identify practical steps to improve business performance through behaviors measured on the survey.
  • Scientific approach…control for as many of the variables that affect both engagement and measures of business performance.
    • To accomplish this, select one business or department;
    • Work with the production and finance teams to gather clean, accurate performance data for the analysis;
    • Keep the data collection confined to one specific region to avoid the culture bias;
    • Ensure the business is big enough to give a large enough snapshot;
    • Assure the metrics used are rigorous and consistent.

Compare locations of the business units that score above a certain score and below a certain score on the employee engagement type assessment by such things as turnover, efficiency, shrink (product loss), return on investment (or other overall financial measure), safety and customer loyalty/satisfaction.


The business data case studies and internal survey samples are included in the course materials in the Certified Recognition Professional program. For more information on CRP certification, please visit http://www.recognition.org/?page=crp_certification. To view a webinar on CRP, click here.

Tags:  CRP  engagement  recognition business case  ROI on recognition strategy 

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