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Recognition in The Real World
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Recognize me! Why your organization needs a recognition program to stay ahead of the game.

Posted By Kathie Pugaczewski, RPI, Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Recognize me! Why your organization needs a recognition program to stay ahead of the game.

Recruitment and Retention. These two terms are at the top of the minds of most organizations these days. Workers of all skills levels and experience now have their pick of where they work, it is now up to prospective employers to set themselves apart from the competition and, not only recruit new employees but retain their current workforce. According to the research presented in the 2018 Trends in Global Employee Engagement report from AON, each of the three elements composing their engagement index improved across the globe: “Say,” which measures employee advocacy, went from 68 percent of employees a year ago to 70 percent this year. “Stay,” which measures the likelihood that employees will remain at their current employer, rose one point to 61 percent of employees. “Strive,” which assesses willingness to give extra effort, improved by two points to 64 percent.” It is clear that employees want to feel recognized for their contributions to the organization and seek out and stay at those organizations who provide this recognition.

With “Rewards & Recognition” topping the list of preferred engagement opportunities again this year, of which “recognition for contributions (beyond pay and benefits)” being a key factor in this ranking it is clear that recognition programs can make or break an organization’s workforce. The question then becomes, with such a larger number of employees reporting recognition being a high motivator for their work, how can your organization tap into this motivation and build a recognition program that not only lasts but impacts your culture.

As per RPI’s Certified Recognition Professionals program, there are 8 key steps to designing a program that is responsive and true to your organization culture.
  1. Create a centrally-managed and global program
    Make sure the program is a single program, not many small unrelated pieces. Make giving recognition quick and easy for all employees. It needs to be consistently branded across all platforms.

  1. Ensure accessibility of the program
    Empower your employees by creating a program that can be accessed by everyone, everywhere.

  1. Recognize most employees every year
    The best practice is to reach at least 80% of your employees annually (Gallup asks if each employee has been recognized in the past 7 days). It can be as simple as a thank-you email or shout-out in a meeting.

  1. Give consistent and ongoing feedback
    Frequency of recognition helps keep employees satisfied in their jobs. Be cautious though, recognition should not be a quota, instead should be authentic and based on employee performance.

  1. Be specific in your recognition
    On the topic of authenticity, most generations in the workforce now can route out inauthentic statements in half a second. While generalized statement may be easy for leadership to “plug and play”, they can cause more harm than good. Be as specific to the employee’s contribution as possible.

  1. Program should be accessible from all platforms
    95% of Americans own a mobile device of some sort, 77% of them are smartphones and it is estimated that by 2019 the total number of mobile users worldwide will surpass the 5 billion mark. Any recognition program you develop should be mobile friendly and accessible from any platform.

  1. Be proportional in local vs national/international awards
    Whether you are a local organization or international, any monetary awards should have equal value, regardless of location. Awards should be location appropriate and have the same lasting emotional impact regardless if the recipient is in Brazil or France.

  1. Make it social
    All of the awards should be visible to other employees to encourage peer-to-peer recognition and increase the impact of the award.


Well organized and thought out recognition programs not only help drive engagement, but can help your organization be up to 40% more profitable.


“Why Recognition? Organizations that give regular ‘thanks to their employees far outperform those that do not” Josh Bersin, founder of Bersin by Deloitte

Expand your knowledge, excel in your job and maximize your recognition program with RPI’s Certified Recognition Professional® (CRP) program.

Tags:  employee engagement  recognition strategy 

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Learn from the best, tips from MIT on building employee engagement

Posted By Kathie Pugaczewski, RPI, Monday, October 29, 2018

Each year, companies are spending almost $750 million per year on engagement. Companies know that creating an engaged culture is important, but the problem is that the spend is not being returned with only 50% of the potential market has been tapped, with only half of the organizations stating an interest in engagement programs actually investing.

So the question needs to be asked, how can you increase employee engagement and create a recognition culture within your organization?

In 2016, RPI awarded Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or MIT as it is better known as, the top award amongst recognition professionals, the RPI Best Practice Standards® Award. The institute began their award winning recognition program in 2001. Prior to this, the Institute was seen by staff as a “praise free zone”. So how in the span of 15 years did the Institute create a major internal cultural shift and build a recognition program that continues to grow? The answer lies within the seven RPI Best Practice Standards®.

Make it robust (Standard 1: Recognition Strategy)

By creating a robust recognition strategy, MIT was built a recognition program that has legs. A multi-tiered model approach, like the one used at the Institute, allows leaders and employees to provide rewards and recognition for all levels of behavior. As we know, recognition does not always have to mean a large ceremony every time an employee or coworker does something worthy of recognition. Instead, building daily “on the spot” awards into a program allows for flexibility and authenticity to the awards. Making the accomplishments measurable ends credibility to the program and removes questions of favoritism, a plague that we know can sink a recognition program in an instant.

Top Down Buy In (Standard 2: Management Responsibility)

To kick start their program, MIT tapped into their senior leaders and staff to be their program champions. From the start, they were included in the development and roll out of the program. Senior leaders and managers serve as key role models by encouraging attendance and presenting at the recognition events, and utilizing the program themselves. Often times, these leaders make up half or close to half all of the “on-the-spot” awards submitted and are frequent nominators for the larger awards.  

Train, Teach, and Train again (Standard 5: Recognition Training)

The MIT model does not only work because of it’s multi-tiered approach to recognition, but because at the start of their employment with MIT, staff are trained on the program. Throughout their careers, MIT provide staff with additional trainings on the program and ample opportunities to be involved in planning of the large year end event. There are articles and tools readily available to all staff and employees on the program and an intranet site dedicated solely to the program creating a single location for all program information.

The MIT Recognition program is a phenomenal example of a program that is built to last. These are only 3 of the key ways the MIT program has grown into an adaptable and award winning part of their culture.

Read more about MIT’s award

Learn more about the 7 best practices for building your recognition program and how you can become a certified recognition professional.

Tags:  employee engagement  employee recognition  employee retention  MIT  RPI 7 Best Practices 

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10 Tips to Help Make Professional Training More Exciting

Posted By Rachel Niebeling, E Group, Inc., Tuesday, September 18, 2018

By Rachel Niebeling, CRP, E Group, Inc.

Professional. Development. Training. The mere thought can strike boredom in even the most academic of hearts.

“61% of workers said their employers are providing upskilling opportunities in the technical and soft skills of the future, only 50% said their employers provide career development opportunities that meet their needs and chances for advancement. (Access Perks)

Companies who boast engaged workers outperform those without engaged workers by 202%, according to a Dale Carnegie study. Clearly, training and learning opportunities at work are a pretty important factor. So how do we help cure the workforce of the “snoozefest” stigma associated with training? How can we possibly make professional training more exciting?

Fear not, training managers! Below, we share with you our proven tips to make professional training more exciting, thus driving employee engagement.

  1. Provide Variety
    Personalities learn and engage differently. With modern technology, it’s easy and affordable to offer a variety of training and learning opportunities at work. For example, a webinar led by a subject matter expert (SME) can be offered live for groups and individuals, and then can be archived for a self-paced learning experience later.
  2. Offer Clarity
    Learners need clear learning objectives shared prior to registration. This helps individuals decide if the topic is truly interesting or useful, as well as focused on specific learning objectives. Clarity also keeps presenters on track.
  3. Have a Good Team
    In order to make professional training exciting, you must deploy a team effort. You also must have the right team. GovLoop, a resource for public sector professionals, has put on hundreds of online trainings. They suggest having a moderator, an SME and backend support. It’s important to have an SME that’s a good facilitator who keeps the topic interesting. Humor and plain language are great tools!
  4. Facilitate Engagement in Training
    It’s important to create an emotional connection with the learner. Storytelling is a great way to facilitate engagement in training. Case studies are a great way to tell a story and show impact.
  5. Gamification
    Gamification is a #buzzword. There’s a reason the Twitterverse is abuzz with gamification… It works! There are many strategies to implement gamification, and it’s proven to work. Ask your current platform provider about their capability for gamification.
  6. Make it Interactive
    If gamification isn’t in the cards, find other ways to make professional training exciting. In an online training, try weaving in poll questions and sharing the results immediately. In a live training, call on people from the crowd. Also, always make sure to leave time for Q&A. Finally, get rid of the text heavy slides and add some graphics.
  7. Reduce the Time
    No one wants to sit through a full day of training, especially online. If you need more than an hour, break it down into shorter sessions and offer breaks. Make sure to leave 10-15 minutes in between each section.
  8. Make the Connection
    Make a connection between each training and job performance. Provide context and relevancy by choosing the right content. Employees need to know what to do after the training and how to connect it with their role. It’s important to define and communicate expectations and objectives.
  9. Get Managers Onboard
    In order to make the connection, manager support and participation is critical. According to a BizLibrary infographic, 49% of disengaged employees are due to problems with direct supervisors. Managers can support learning by encouraging participation and setting a good example. Managers should also seek results from trainings and give recognition.
  10. Community and recognition
    Use social and collaboration tools to build company culture around training. Social tools can help with relationship building, enhance information flow and promote the sharing of ideas. They also provide a platform for recognition both peer-to-peer and manager-to-employee.

    Bonus: Follow up for learning effectiveness. The best training in the world will be wasted if there is no follow up. Follow up with tip #8, make a connection with employee objectives.

Keep up the good work, training managers! Now that you have a few additional tricks to increase engagement during trainings, you can decide which ones to try during your training sessions.

About The Author
Rachel Niebeling, CRP, is Sr. Director, Training, Rewards & Engagement with E Group. She is dedicated to building best practice engagement programs and has a passion for making your work day better.

Tags:  career development  employee engagement  employee training 

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Recognition Drives Employee Engagement at the University of Calgary

Posted By Sue Yoemans, Monday, August 20, 2018
By Elena Rhodes and Iryna Leonova on behalf of the University of Calgary

How to build a culture of recognition if you have more than 5,000 employees and your workforce is incredibly diverse? The University of Calgary approached this challenge by creating its Employee Recognition Strategy. The initiative is focused on recognizing individual and team behaviors and achievements which support university’s strategic goals and core values, while promoting a positive and respectful workplace.

However, creating a strategy is not enough. The university formed a dedicated recognition team in Human Resources to lead management of the strategy. It was also essential to find advocates across the organization to support its further development, implementation, and evaluation.

Three groups of recognition advocates help build a culture of recognition. The first one is the Employee Recognition Steering Committee. This committee of representatives from diverse employee groups worked on the Recognition Strategy. Following that, the Steering Committee has been guiding the strategy implementation. The Recognition Steering Committee is also responsible for using available resources, such as the information from a recognition preferences survey, to provide guidance on what recognition programs and practices are relevant to the employees. The recognition team collaborates with the Steering Committee in developing best practice recognition programs, education, and communication.

Local engagement or recognition committees in various faculties, schools, and departments represent the second group. Given that the University of Calgary is very diverse, the same practice will not fit all. The local committees help tailor university-wide recognition programs and practices to the units’ and faculties’ culture, goals, and unique landscape. The recognition team supports local committees through an ongoing consultation process.

Finally, the third group is the Employee Recognition Champions Network. The Network is a relatively new group created through an open call. Recognition champions are faculty and staff who are committed to acknowledging the great work that is happening across campus through formal recognition programs and informal recognition practices. Local recognition committees often provide a representative for the Recognition Champions Network. 

The champions learn about a variety of recognition tools and programs that are available at the university and exchange ideas among each other. They aim to promote effective recognition practices in their faculty or unit – individually or as part of a committee – with focus on peer-to-peer recognition. They also help the recognition team with feedback on recognition tools, practices, and programs and information on challenges and successes in their areas. The recognition champions meet bi-monthly to learn about recognition and exchange ideas. Between meetings, they communicate through a dedicated SharePoint site.

Together, these three groups of advocates provide robust guidance to the recognition team. They also help develop recognition into a grass-root culture campus-wide. The recognition advocates help build connections between different groups of employees, and create flexible and sustainable recognition programs and practices.

To learn more about this RPI award-winning initiative, please visit the University of Calgary website at https://www.ucalgary.ca/

The University of Calgary won the RPI Best Practice Standards® Award in 2018 form Recognition Professionals International (RPI). The RPI Best Practice Standards® Award honors organizations who implement the RPI Best Practice Standards®, which are based on knowledge gained from academic literature, professional conferences, and shared experiences in developing successful recognition programs. Standards are designed to be useful for the creation and evaluation of recognition programs in the public and private sectors, large and small organizations, and organizations with single or multiple locations or functions.

Tags:  employee engagement  employee recognition  RPI 7 Best Practices(SM) 

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RPI Honors BAE Systems & University of Calgary with 2018 Best Practice Awards

Posted By Sue Yoemans, Friday, May 11, 2018

 

BAE Systems and the University of Calgary took home the top honors at the recent Recognition Professionals International Annual Convention in Nashville. It was the first time RPI has had a tie for the top award, as both BAE Systems and the University of Calgary received the honor.

BAE Systems was recognized for embracing RPI’s Seven Best Practice Standards. Like many organizations, BAE Systems applied for the award in the past and last year received three Excellence in Standards awards. BAE Systems has a company-wide program to recognize and reward employee accomplishments, which are strongly tied to their performance and living their cultural values.

The strength of the BAE Systems recognition program comes from the fact that it was designed by its employees and grows because they are vested and have ownership of the program and the tools. BAE Systems regularly and responsibly reviews each program for its responsiveness to employee needs. Their program utilization, which has risen by over 200% in the past four years, has become a key measurement with its executive leadership team and is a part of the organization’s strategic goals for continuous improvement.

The University of Calgary is a first-time award applicant. This organization formed a cross-disciplinary Recognition Steering Committee to guide the development, implementation, and ongoing review of employee recognition in 2013. They did so understanding the key role of recognition in employee engagement, satisfaction, and retention. The Committee set out to create a recognition strategy that aligned with the university’s strategic plan and values – to provide best practice recognition programs, education and communication for all staff. To build the strategy, they used their findings from an Employee Recognition Preferences survey, the analysis of existing practices and programs as well as reviewing  recognition programs at leading universities in Canada and consulting with a third party provider.

RPI judges were impressed with the strategic way the University of Calgary embraced this process. They took the time to create a network of the right organizational champions, they ensured they had great baseline data; their program supports the goals and values of the university, and they created some fun, engaging and well-used tools.

RPI’s Best Practices Judges for 2018 were:

  • Roy Saunderson, Chief Learning Officer at Rideau Recognition
  • Shelley Judges, Senior Manager of Employee Experience for TD Business Banking and a 2010 Best Practice winner
  • Dee Hansford, who has facilitated CRP and been instrumental with two organizations’ being awarded the overall Best Practices Award.
  • Cori Champagne of MIT, the 2016 Best Overall recipient.

Tags:  Awards  Best Practice Standards  Best Practices  employee engagement 

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Standard Success Stories: RBC’s Recognition Strategy

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Tuesday, January 9, 2018
Untitled Document

Note: RPI’s Seven Best Practice Standards are the cornerstone of successful employee recognition and rewards programs. In 2018, we are taking a closer look at each of the seven standards and RPI members who have been recognized for their practice of those standards. In the first installment, we take a look at Recognition Strategy, and the award-winning way that RBC practices this standard. The RPI Best Practice Awards nominations are now open for nominations through February 1, 2018.

RBC, based in Toronto, was a recipient of the Overall RPI Best Practice® Award in 2017, and is a shining example of how to do recognition strategy right. From their award-winning entry, they offer several samples of the ideas and actions behind their recognition strategy efforts.

All of RBC’s recognition and reward programs under the RBC Performance brand align with their Purpose, Vision and Values to become a leader in financial services wherever in the world they serve customers. That vision and those values help drive their recognition programs and are part of the criteria within the RBC Performance recognition and reward program.

RBC Performance, which is their flagship program, was launched in 1993 as a sales incentive points reward and recognition program and now serves over 75,000 employees. Among the core points of the program are:

  • Day-to-Day Recognition – RBC associates give and receive recognition to and from their peers and from retail branch managers and regional leaders on a regular basis.
  •  InstantThanks – RBC’s social recognition program permits employees so say thanks and send commendation comments and recognition for demonstrating our values and excellent customer service.
  • Branch Huddles – These happen before the bank door opens. Here customer service and product information is given. Managers and team members weave in recognition as often as they can.
  • Informal Recognition – RBC Performance is a comprehensive recognition system dedicated to improving RBC’s financial and service performance results.
  • RBC Performance Nominations and Awards – Employees can recognize individuals and teams who consistently go beyond expectations and make a difference in the business. RBC employees can nominate a colleague or team with RBC Performance’s online nomination feature. Nominations are based on RBC’s values and other key behaviors, and are expected to focus on outstanding performance in these categories. Managers select nominations based on merit and can award point values to send to the employee. The number of nominations and awards received contributes to selecting who attends the RBC Performance Conference.
  • Scratch ‘n Win Cards – Managers can give these cards for on-the-spot recognition. Employees virtually “scratch” a bar online to reveal a point value or the chance to be entered into a monthly draw.
  • Sales Campaigns – Managers in retail banking can recognize and reward employees and teams with points for achieving highest sales or service activities in any quarterly sales campaign.

The company also believes in more formal recognition, with a series of events and awards:

  • Leo Awards – This is RBC’s Academy-award-style celebration event. Employees who showcase the very best in sales, service or support are recognized at a special event during the RBC Performance Conference with “The Leo” Award. Regional leaders select Leo Award recipients from RBC Performance Conference recipients.
  • RBC Performance Conference – This is the best-of-the best annual conference for RBC’s top performers. Each region has a set number of eligible nominees to select. Quarterly Point Award winners are eligible candidates. Regional presidents and senior leaders choose conference attendees from across all roles. Conference winners are announced at each Regional Gala event. Each awardee receives a registration package to attend the Conference.
  • RBC Service Awards – Employees receive a choice of a gift award item on their milestone anniversary at two, five, 10, 15 years and in five-year increments up to 50-year level.

The results have not only been award from RPI, but recognition of RBC as one of the best places to work in Canada. For more information on RBC and their success with Recognition Strategy, please visit the company culture website at: https://www.rbc.com/careers/people-culture-awards.html

Tags:  employee engagement  formal recognition  RBC  recognition  recognition strategies  RPI 7 Best Practices  Strategy  success stories  Toronto 

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CRP Success Story: Jami Young, Asurion

Posted By By Jess Myers, RPI, Wednesday, October 18, 2017
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The mantra of life-long learning is alive and well in Jami Young, CRP. A senior manager of customer solutions engagement at Nashville-based Asurion, Young completed her CRP certification nearly a decade ago. But through the many resources available in the employee recognition world, her skills are in a state of constant updating.

If you own an insurance policy on your smartphone, there’s a good chance you’re an Asurion customer. The company, with around 10,000 employees in the U.S. and Canada, offers technology insurance policies. Young handles rewards and recognition for their call center operations and had been there for two years.

“I was able to come in and implement a system of measurements and involve our executive leadership in recognition,” Young said. “I needed to make sure we’re able to change as the business changes. I had training that was very conceptual, and now that I’m in it I see the importance of the structure involved in the recognition strategy model. When you’re in this role it’s such a collaborative effort and you have to able to show value at every step. I feel like CRP training was a huge driver  in that.”

Her CRP journey began nine years ago in Texas as Inspirus, where she worked with Theresa Harkins.

“Because Theresa was a certified trainer, we actually got to do CRP certification on site, which was really cool,” Young recalled. “That was my first jump into CRP training and I loved it. I feel it taught me a lot about why my customers were the practitioners of recognition, why it was important, how you show value to the rest of your organization and then how you start from scratch.”

Nearly a decade later, Young uses what she learned in the CRP program regularly.

“If I get in a rut, I have all of my CRP notebooks on hand and I’ll pull them out,” she said. “If I have to create a communications plan or a training program, I’ll pull out my CRP notebooks to see what the industry says and what my training says about the best practices in those areas.”

And the information available from RPI is an additional wealth of continuing education.

“I go to the RPI website all the time. There are really great whitepapers and presentations that you can review to see what other teams have done,” she said. “When it comes to this industry there are a lot of different ways of doing things. I’m not a HR professional, I’m an employee engagement professional. I’ve been on the operation support side of things, but I can get a lot of great information about what other companies do to drive recognition from the RPI website.”

A regular attendee at the RPI conference, Young said that with experience comes a propensity to tell colleagues about CRP certification and what a benefit it’s been in her career successes.

“It’s always going to be a part of what I do,” Young said. “I drank the Kool-Aid about recognition a long time ago so any chance I get I’ll push the certification to help people think about how they provide value. I think of CRP as a great way of helping strengthen our team. I want others to drink the Kool-Aid as well and I think RPI is a great way to do that.

 

Tags:  7 Best Practices  CRP  employee engagement 

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CRP Graduates Tout The Certification’s Value

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Friday, August 11, 2017

Since its launch a decade ago, recognition professionals from every corner of North America have learned the value of certification to their career and their organization’s employee engagement success. Recognition Professionals International made all of its Certified Recognition Professional® (CRP) courses available online in February, to grow our graduate community.

In recent weeks, several recognition professionals have offered their testimonials about CRP, and the value it provides in the profession:

“Since becoming a Certified Recognition Professional nine years ago, I have used the knowledge, expertise and industry best practices I gained to help my clients structure award-winning, sustainable programs.  Each year RPI offers opportunities for professional development that allow CRPs to remain on the cutting edge of this dynamic industry and I am grateful to be a part of this thriving community.” – Dee Hansford, CRP, Dee Hansford Consulting.

“I have found the CRP certification to be valuable not only to my professional growth, but most importantly a great benefit to the clients that I support. The certification has given me the confidence to guide clients to best practice recognition solutions. This is critical for building a culture of appreciation and the long-term success of their recognition initiatives.” – Kelli Johnson, CRP, Launch Manager, O.C. Tanner Company.

“Having worked in and out of the recognition industry for the past 15 years, it wasn’t until I went through the certification process that I fully understood the systematic methods and strategies of recognition and incentives. Obtaining my CRP and going through recertification has provided a fundamental foundation as well as competencies required for implementing and assessing programs/campaigns.  If you are thinking about pursuing your certification, just GO FOR IT!”  – Lori Rains, MA, CRP, Senior Program Manager, Spear One.

“Obtaining my CRP was the icing on the cake when I was called to write a reward and recognition program for over 10,000 employees. Having the resources and materials to reflect on my learning ensured that we had a quality recognition program using the best poractice standards.  I encourage anyone who has a passion or their job supports reward and recognition to take the RPI CRP program.  The networking and information is invaluable!  Thanks RPI.” – Carole Erken, CRP, Director of Human Resources, Kaiser Permanente.

“Going through the RPI certification was certainly a turning point in my career. As a solutions provider, it was extremely beneficial to learn more in depth about the science behind recognition and study the countless examples of what drives success. There were many ‘A-ha’ moments throughout. The focus on seven best practices and why they are crucial to a successful recognition program forms the basis of what RPI is all about. Amazing organization, I’d highly recommend the CRP courses they have certainly helped in my career, by influencing our internal strategy for recognition as well as how we deliver for our clients.” – Mark A. Prine, CRP, Vice President, National Accounts, EGR International Inc.

Goals of the CRP program include:

  • To raise the professional standards of those engaged in employee recognition.
  • To encourage continuing education for professional development.
  • To encourage self-development by offering guidelines for achievement in the employee recognition profession.
  • To identify and award special recognition to those persons who have demonstrated a comprehensive knowledge of those principles and practices of employee recognition and also laws governing and affecting employee recognition.

CRP designation consists of four courses and exams. All CRP candidates receive the comprehensive learning guide which includes valuable templates, worksheets and case studies that can be utilized to implement a recognition program based on RPI’s Seven Best Practices. Each course is $595 for practitioner premium/business partner members; $750 for basic RPI members and $795 for non-members. Until October 1, 2017, participants can save $75 on each course by using the promo code “Recognition17” when registering.

CRP designation demonstrates to leaders, peers and clients a commitment to continuing education and excellence in the discipline of workforce recognition. RPI’s program is renowned as the most comprehensive, authoritative resource for individuals seeking to develop and test their skills and knowledge within this field.

RPI offers a webinar featuring additional testimonials from several CRP graduates. For more information, please visit the official RPI website, www.rec

 

Tags:  certification  CRP  employee engagement  recognition strategies 

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