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Recognition in The Real World
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3 Takeaways: What Can Higher Education Teach Your Company about Recognition?

Posted By Kathie Pugaczewski CRP, RPI, Friday, January 24, 2020

3 Takeaways: What Can Higher Education Teach Your Company about Recognition?

From the RPI January 2020 Webinar presented by Brenda Naegel, Yale University; Iryna Leonova, University of Calgary; and Cori Champagne, MIT. 

1. Be Thoughtful in Setting Up Your Recognition Program

  • Proper set-up sets the stage for a great recognition program. First, you should know what you want from your program. Are there specific goals you would like to meet? Would you like to see staff more energized? Be sure to begin your program with a goal in mind.
  • Utilize your “recognition champions.” Pick a member of your staff who you believe is already great at motivating or recognizing others. Allow them to help you in creating your recognition program.
  • Get organized. Create a schedule for when you will roll out your program and when you will hold informational meetings for your participants.

2. Measure Your Program’s Success and Evaluate the Results

  • It is hard to have a successful recognition program without being able to measure your progress. 
  • Keep track of your website’s traffic, how many users you have and more. 
  • Evaluate your progress weekly, or even daily, in order to see potential areas of growth.

3. Communication Is Key

  • Analyze what your participants’ and audiences’ needs are. Are they always on the go? You may need to focus on optimizing your webpage for mobile phones. 
  • Frequently check in on your website. Make sure that there is not a registration form open for an event that already happened. Update the website with winners of an award soon after the event. Details and recency are key to a great website.

Practitioner members and Business Partners get complimentary access to this webinar on-demand in the Learning Center along with 50+ other webinars and assets to drive your recognition strategy.
 
Read more about RPI's 7 Best Practice Standards®
Register for upcoming webinars here: https://www.recognition.org/events/event_list.asp 
 


Tags:  education  employee recognition  recognition programs  recognition trends  RPI 7 best practices 

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Revamped CRP 1 Now Live for On-Line Learners

Posted By By Jess Myers, RPI, Thursday, December 21, 2017
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The world of employee recognition is constantly changing and evolving, so it makes sense that the renowned education program designed with employee recognition in mind – the popular Certified Recognition Professional® courses – are changing with the times.

It’s that need to be up-to-date and relevant which led to a major revamp of all of the courses in the past year and the final changes to CRP 1 are now complete. Hargrove was part of the team that set to work over the summer remaking CRP 1 – the first of the program’s four sections – and their efforts are now live, having been completed in the late fall.

CRP 1 was the program’s first course, designed to introduce the principles and best practices of recognition. It had gone online several years ago, and after they had revamped CRP 2, 3 and 4, a team led by Rita Maehling and including Hargrove and Dee Hansford felt in order to reflect the new information and new materials included in the newly-developed on-line portion of the program, revisions were needed.

CRP 1 is the foundation for the certification courses. It is an overview method that introduces the entire process. So the revisions ensure that participants are getting the most current thinking in the recognition area.

“We divided and conquered. Dee took the actual on-line slide and I did the learning guide,” Hargrove said of the lengthy and thorough revision project. “She pulled in some existing slides, some slides from the other courses and she also worked with the narration to get the voice talent. Once she had identified the slides’ content, I went through and developed a learning guide to accompany the course.”

The idea was to create a new CRP 1 learning guide that a person can download and use as a reference while they are going through the course and after the course as well. The team included general things like a glossary, references and places where participants can find additional information so that it will be useful beyond just going through the on-line course. It was a necessary change.

“It was not in alignment with the other three courses, and since CRP 1 is the prerequisite for 2, 3 and 4, we wanted to make sure that the information was current and aligned with the new information in 2, 3 and 4,” Hargrove said. “The RPI 7 Best Practices® didn’t change. That’s the standard. But the supporting information and the content that was included in the new 2, 3 and 4 had changed, so we wanted to make sure we were bringing in as current information as we could.”

For example, there are several surveys that different organizations do on an annual and bi-annual basis. They referred to those studies and offered a reference so that people can go back each year and get the newest study information.

And by having the course on-line, people can learn at their own pace, although Hargrove admits there are advantages to both on-line and classroom learning.

“From a participant perspective, on-line courses are certainly more convenient in that you can do it in your own time. The pros are the time commitment, because you can come back to the course, finish a little bit and come back to do more, and you can go over things as many times as you like,” Hargrove said. “In a facilitator-led course you have the advantage of other people who are in a similar position as you, being able to discuss different challenges and how other people handle those challenges.”

She added that the team of Rita, Dee and Vicki did great work together.

“It’s always enjoyable to work with them and get a project done,” Hargrove said. “We hope it will be of value to the participants who are going through CRP. Even if they just take CRP 1 I think it will give them a good foundation of how to organize their own recognition program or how to modify an existing recognition program.”

For more information about the CRP program, please visit www.recognition.org/crp_certification. CRP 2 and 3 will be offered at the RPI Conference in Nashville in April, 2018.

Tags:  7 Best Practices  Certification  CRP  education  online learning 

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