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Recognition in The Real World
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5 Communication Plan Components

Posted By Administration, Thursday, August 22, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, August 21, 2019

Standard 4 of RPI's Best Practices® is the Recognition Program Communication Plan, which aids in the presentation of the organizations recognition program. The organization should establish and maintain a strategic communication plan that communicates all aspects of the recognition strategy, including program objectives, recognition processes, events, celebrations, tools, and a contact person. The following components can be used develop your organizations communication plan.

Does your recognition communication plan:

  1. Develop a message related to each of the Recognition Program components?

  2. Identify the audience for each of the messages?

  3. Designate the communication method for each message?

  4. Assign who is responsible for delivering the message and frequency of message?

  5. Include measures to determine how well the message was delivered and understood?

Tips

  1. Specific messages are developed to promote recognition activities.
  2. Target audiences are identified for each of the messages.
  3. Each target audience has a communication method(s) identified that is accessible for those persons.
  4. Leaders have specific messages assigned. Additional persons also are identified to deliver messages to specific target audiences.
  5. Part of the communication plan includes measurements to determine if the messages were delivered and if the messages were understood. Review of these measurements by the leadership determine what additional communication may be necessary and by what method and messenger.

Read more about RPI's 7 Best Practice Standards® here: https:// www.recognition.org/page/ best_practice

Tags:  Communication strategy  Recognition Program Communication Plan  recognition strategy 

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Five Key Management Responsibilities for Recognition

Posted By Administration, Friday, August 9, 2019

Standard 2 of RPI's 7 Best Practice Standards®, Management Responsibility, discusses the active role senior leaders and management should have in their recognition programs. The following five behaviors can be used to reflect on management responsibilities in your recognition program.

Management Responsibilities

Senior leaders and management actively endorse and are held accountable for
planning, supporting, reviewing, and participating in the recognition program.

Do your leaders support employee recognition with the following behaviors:

  1. Define the overall recognition strategy (policies, procedures, and program objectives that reflect commitment to recognition?

  2. Support the recognition program by communicating support to all employees, and is personally involved in the program?

  3. Identify and provide adequate resources to manage and maintain the recognition program?

  4. Make recognition part of performance reviews and meeting agendas?

  5. Review the effectiveness of the recognition program?

Tips

  1. Senior leaders define the recognition behaviors needed to advance the organization’s goals. There is agreement to what policies, procedures, and objectives are needed to improve the behaviors.
  2. Senior leaders commit to deliver and reinforce any recognition messages, and personally actively support the recognition programs.
  3. Senior leaders provide a budget appropriate for the needed recognition activities. These resources include financial as well as non-financial.
  4. Senior leaders ensure the supporting recognition behaviors are incorporated into performance expectations. Recognition opportunities are consciously included into leadership and management agendas. All managers are held accountable for providing employees appreciation for their contributions.
  5. Senior leaders review measurements for recognition programs to determine how effective they are in promoting those needed behaviors. They make decisions as to the what happens to current programs and recommendations for needed changes.

Read more about RPI's 7 Best Practice Standards® here: https:// www.recognition.org/page/ best_practice

Tags:  7 Best Practice Standards  Management responsibility  recognition strategy 

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5 Key Recognition Strategy Components

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, August 7, 2019

RPI's 7 Best Practice Standards® are designed to aid in the creation and evaluation of recognition programs in the public and private sectors, large and small organizations, and organizations with single or multiple locations or functions. Standard 1, The Recognition Strategy, provides purpose for how employee recognition encourages the organization’s goals and objectives. The following five components can be used to evaluate your organizations recognition strategy.

Recognition Strategy

The organization has a written recognition strategy that articulates the philosophy and objectives for all recognition practices, including day-to-day, informal, and formal recognition programs. The recognition strategy provides purpose and direction for how employee recognition encourages and rewards specific employee behaviors that advance the organization’s goals and objectives. All recognition activities are aligned with the mission and culture of the organization. Does your recognition strategy:

  1. Link to the organizational vision, mission, and values?

  2. Provide day-to-day, informal and formal recognition activities?

  3. Have documented procedures?

  4. Include specific and actionable objectives?

  5. Utilize continuous improvement through feedback and measurement?

Tips

  1. There is a formal, written recognition strategy that supports the organization’s strategic goals. Behaviors are identified with recognition program and practices and employees are rewarded for demonstrating those behaviors.
  2. The Recognition Program has day-to-day, informal and formal recognition activities. Actions are specific, timely and meaningful for all.
  3. Recognition related procedures (dimensions, nominations, award selections, taxes, event planning, budgeting, tracking, team, evaluation, etc.) are documented and available across the organization. These procedures are regularly reviewed and revised as needed.
  4. Leaders are involved in setting the recognition strategic objectives which are directly linked to the organization’s strategic goals. There is a regular review of the actions and the impact on the strategy.
  5. The Recognition Strategy includes how the effectiveness will be evaluated and in what timeframe. The Recognition Life Cycle is used to determine what action needs to be taken based on the feedback and measurement.

Read more about RPI's 7 Best Practice Standards® here: https:// www.recognition.org/page/ best_practice

Tags:  organizational development  Recognition Strategy  RPI  RPI Best Practices 

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Recognizing Employees Everyday: 4 Tips for Maximizing Recognition

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, June 12, 2019
Updated: Monday, June 3, 2019

Recognizing Employees Everyday: 4 Tips for Maximizing Recognition

When thinking about employee recognition, the first thing that comes to mind might be an extravagant event or a ‘years of service’ award. While annual and scheduled activities are both important formal ways to celebrate the contributions of employees, one that is equally as important is informal everyday recognition.

Before diving into everyday recognition, the question needs to be asked: why should organizations recognize employees in the first place? The answer is easy: everyday recognition is a great way to encourage employee engagement and show appreciation for their hard work without a large cost. Furthermore, author and industry expert Josh Bersin notes that “Organizations that give regular ‘thanks to their employees’ far outperform those that do not”. When it comes down to it, everyday recognition seems like a simple way to support employees, while simultaneously benefiting the organization.

And it is. Everyday (or day-to-day) recognition is simple. It doesn’t have to be fancy; it is cheap, and it encourages everyone in the organization to participate. And most importantly, everyday recognition is sustainable because it makes it easy for managers and employees to keep the recognition program ongoing.

Based on RPI’s Seven Best Practice Standards, successful recognition programs are balanced -- they incorporate day-to-day, informal, and formal recognition. Want to make your employee recognition program a success? Here are four effective and meaningful ways to recognize employees everyday:

  1. Verbal
  2. It seems obvious, but verbal recognition is one of the easiest and most meaningful ways to incorporate recognition every single day. Even a simple and specific “thank you” in the moment is powerful and can make someone’s day.

  3. Emails and notes
  4. Even the busiest workers can make time to recognize employees. Emails and notes are another simple, quick, and meaningful way to recognize individuals, even if you work remotely or are on the go.

  5. Encourage peer to peer recognition
  6. Managers aren’t the only people who can provide recognition. Letting everyone participate not only fosters relationships between coworkers, but also creates a positive work environment.

  7. Calls, instant messaging, and social media
  8. Most people have access to a mobile or work phone throughout the day, making it easy to give recognition via instant messaging or on the organization’s intranet and open social media channels. While it may not be the most popular option, never underestimate the power of even a brief phone call.

When it comes to recognition, the payoff is not something tangible. It is in the act itself. Maximize your time, money, and employee potential by incorporating everyday recognition into your organization’s program.

Recognition strategy is just one of RPI’s Seven Best Practice Standards. Learn about the other standards here.

Want to go deeper? Check out Recognition Fundamentals to expand your knowledge, excel in your job and maximize your recognition program.

Tags:  7 Best Practice Standards  Recognition  Recognition Strategy 

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Why it’s important to recognize employees and how you can plan the perfect celebration

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, June 5, 2019
Updated: Monday, June 3, 2019

Why it’s important to recognize employees and how you can plan the perfect celebration

Engaged employees are an important asset to companies today and it’s no secret why.

According to The Ultimate Guide to Employee Recognition by Achievers and RPI’s CRP program, “Engaged employees perform 20% better and are 87% less likely to leave their organization”. It doesn’t stop there though. Higher rates of engagement among employees also correlate to a more profitable and productive company.

So, what is the best way to drive employee engagement?

Recognition. The study Employee Performance: What Causes Great Work found that “94% of respondents who were exposed to an excellent recognition practice perceived it to be ‘very effective’ at causing them to produce great work”.  Especially with this statistic, there is no reason to not give employees the recognition they want and deserve.

Based on RPI’s Seven Best Practice Standards, the most successful programs are balanced and provide a combination of day-to-day, informal, and formal recognition. While day-to-day and informal are more spur-of-the-moment and less structured, formal recognition requires extensive planning and can be overwhelming.

It doesn’t have to be though. Virginia-based technology company and RPI Best Practice Overall award-winner BAE Systems has proved just how stress-free formal recognition can be. Illustrated through BAE Systems, here are five tips to help you plan the perfect celebratory formal event to recognize employees:

1.     Pick a date and make sure it’s timely

One of the necessary first steps to take in planning a celebration to recognize employees is to set a date for the event. Do this well in advance to allow enough time to plan it. Make sure that it does not conflict with religious, work, or school holidays, and that the employee is being recognized at an appropriate time. BAE Systems celebrates service anniversaries and birthdays as part of their recognition strategy, ensuring the events are held in a timely manner.

2.     Create an event plan

The plan should include everything related to the event such as the goals, branding, sponsorship, and venue logistics. Having a master plan will help organize the planning process and will ensure a smooth celebration.

3.     Have an events team

Planning an event takes a lot of time and effort. Having a team dedicated to organizing the event, details, and logistics can help make sure it is a success.

4.     Give the award to reinforce beneficial behaviors

Successful employee recognition programs reflect the values of the company. Employees who are recognized should behave in a matter that upholds these values, acting as a model for others. When recognizing employees, BAE Systems uses their core values as a guide and honors those who are:

a.     Trusted to deliver on commitments

b.     Innovative in finding and turning ideas and technologies into solutions

c.      Bold in accepting new challenges and managing risks

5.     Make the event specific to the individual

If an employee is being recognized, others should know why. Explain the importance of their work or behavior, and do so in a way that is meaningful. To go the extra mile, include the employee’s family by inviting them to the celebration. BAE Systems does this by offering multiple awards that recognize employees’ individual achievements and contributions to projects and programs.

Employees value recognition, no matter the size of the gesture. It’s important to incorporate formal recognition and events, but don’t let event planning get the best of you. With these tips, you’re on the way to creating the perfect moment that they will cherish forever.

Learn more about BAE Systems and their award-winning recognition strategy.

Event planning and celebrations are only one of RPI’s Seven Best Practice Standards. Learn about the others here.

Want to learn more about employee recognition? Checkout RPI’s Certified Recognition Professional® (CRP)/Recognition program to expand your knowledge, excel in your job and maximize your recognition program.

Tags:  Employee Engagement  Formal Recognition  Recognition Strategy  RPI 7 Best Practices 

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Reporter on the Scene: Demonstrating and Elevating the ROI of Recognition Programs

Posted By Rebecca Wegscheid, Wednesday, April 24, 2019
Updated: Monday, April 22, 2019

Reporter on the Scene: Demonstrating and Elevating the ROI of Recognition Programs

At the 2019 RPI Annual Conference Dr. Charles Scherbaum shared something that many recognition professionals experience; most organizations invest considerable resources into employee recognition programs, but a vast majority underutilize their recognition programs as a strategic tool that can help elevate their performance. Throughout his presentation “Demonstrating and Elevating the ROI of Recognition Programs”, Dr. Scherbaum discussed how recognition analytics can be used to link employee recognition program data to key business outcomes like employee engagement, customer experience, or sales to formulate return on investment (ROI). Applying recognition analytics to an employee recognition program can help organizations clearly understand how the ROI can be enhanced by developing managers and employees to be more effective at recognition. 

Key Session Takeaways

Effective managers create effective programs. Mangers are the key to making recognition programs work. By training managers individually on their needs and weaknesses they create better appreciation at work, better customer loyaty and better performance. ROI can be established when effectiveness is tied to employee, customers and business ourcomes.

Putting it into Practice/Aha-Moments

Since managers are the key to making a recognition program work, the focus needs to be on training managers on an individual basis on how to produce better experiences for recipients. Measuring the ROI of your program will then come next. Based off the information from Dr. Scherbaum, you can do this by utilizing the perspective of the recipient, not the manager. Using this frame, you will be able to measure recognition ROI by frequency, velocity, reach, authenticity over time.

 

Reporter on the Scene

Donna Mitsos

Innovation Meetings

 

Tags:  recognition  recognition strategy  ROI on recognition strategy  RPI conference 

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Reporter on the Scene: What can Higher Education Teach Your Company about Recognition?

Posted By Rebecca Wegscheid, Thursday, April 18, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Reporter on the Scene: What can Higher Education Teach Your Company about Recognition?

At the 2019 RPI Annual Conference, Brenda Naegel of Yale University, Iryna Leonova of the University of Calgary, and Cori Champagne of MIT presented an insightful presentation to attendees focusing on what higher education can teach us about recognition. Throughout their presentation the team highlighted how to build, promote and measure a recognition program along with how to navigate any challenges along the way.

Key Session Takeaways

By taking attendees through the “recognition lifecycle” from building a program in house, to including a diverse workforce, measuring impact and evaluating results, the presenters provided some great insights into crafting a recognition strategy that fits your company or organization. Some key points that I will be utilizing in my work are:

  • A “one size fits all” strategy just will not work when it comes to recognition programs because for each program the audience varies.
  • Getting your leaders on board at the beginning is crucial. Once you have your leadership bought into the program, they can cascade the recognition message.
  • Measuring the success of your program is an on-going process. Maintaining clean reporting and analytics will help you communicate the value of the program and identify any potential areas for improvement.

Putting it into Practice/Aha-Moments

I really enjoyed this presentation by the team of Brenda Naegel, Iryna Leonova and Cori Champagne. I think my biggest takeaway was something all recognition professionals know, but should be reminded of from time to time, “Recognition is important to all businesses and organizations”. The key is to not utilize a recognition strategy just because it worked for someone else but make it unique and your own to meet your goals.

 

Reporter on the Scene

Vicki Hargrove

Hargrove Business Consulting 

Tags:  Higher Education  Recognition  Recognition Strategy  RPI conference 

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Recognize me! Why your organization needs a recognition program to stay ahead of the game.

Posted By Kathie Pugaczewski, RPI, Tuesday, November 13, 2018

Recognize me! Why your organization needs a recognition program to stay ahead of the game.

Recruitment and Retention. These two terms are at the top of the minds of most organizations these days. Workers of all skills levels and experience now have their pick of where they work, it is now up to prospective employers to set themselves apart from the competition and, not only recruit new employees but retain their current workforce. According to the research presented in the 2018 Trends in Global Employee Engagement report from AON, each of the three elements composing their engagement index improved across the globe: “Say,” which measures employee advocacy, went from 68 percent of employees a year ago to 70 percent this year. “Stay,” which measures the likelihood that employees will remain at their current employer, rose one point to 61 percent of employees. “Strive,” which assesses willingness to give extra effort, improved by two points to 64 percent.” It is clear that employees want to feel recognized for their contributions to the organization and seek out and stay at those organizations who provide this recognition.

With “Rewards & Recognition” topping the list of preferred engagement opportunities again this year, of which “recognition for contributions (beyond pay and benefits)” being a key factor in this ranking it is clear that recognition programs can make or break an organization’s workforce. The question then becomes, with such a larger number of employees reporting recognition being a high motivator for their work, how can your organization tap into this motivation and build a recognition program that not only lasts but impacts your culture.

As per RPI’s Certified Recognition Professionals program, there are 8 key steps to designing a program that is responsive and true to your organization culture.
  1. Create a centrally-managed and global program
    Make sure the program is a single program, not many small unrelated pieces. Make giving recognition quick and easy for all employees. It needs to be consistently branded across all platforms.

  1. Ensure accessibility of the program
    Empower your employees by creating a program that can be accessed by everyone, everywhere.

  1. Recognize most employees every year
    The best practice is to reach at least 80% of your employees annually (Gallup asks if each employee has been recognized in the past 7 days). It can be as simple as a thank-you email or shout-out in a meeting.

  1. Give consistent and ongoing feedback
    Frequency of recognition helps keep employees satisfied in their jobs. Be cautious though, recognition should not be a quota, instead should be authentic and based on employee performance.

  1. Be specific in your recognition
    On the topic of authenticity, most generations in the workforce now can route out inauthentic statements in half a second. While generalized statement may be easy for leadership to “plug and play”, they can cause more harm than good. Be as specific to the employee’s contribution as possible.

  1. Program should be accessible from all platforms
    95% of Americans own a mobile device of some sort, 77% of them are smartphones and it is estimated that by 2019 the total number of mobile users worldwide will surpass the 5 billion mark. Any recognition program you develop should be mobile friendly and accessible from any platform.

  1. Be proportional in local vs national/international awards
    Whether you are a local organization or international, any monetary awards should have equal value, regardless of location. Awards should be location appropriate and have the same lasting emotional impact regardless if the recipient is in Brazil or France.

  1. Make it social
    All of the awards should be visible to other employees to encourage peer-to-peer recognition and increase the impact of the award.


Well organized and thought out recognition programs not only help drive engagement, but can help your organization be up to 40% more profitable.


“Why Recognition? Organizations that give regular ‘thanks to their employees far outperform those that do not” Josh Bersin, founder of Bersin by Deloitte

Expand your knowledge, excel in your job and maximize your recognition program with RPI’s Certified Recognition Professional® (CRP) program.

Tags:  employee engagement  recognition strategy 

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Building a Culture of Recognition

Posted By Amy Hurley CRP, Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Wednesday, September 26, 2018

In study after study on recognition, retention and staff engagement, we have learned that people commonly leave jobs not because of pay or where they park or the food in the cafeteria. They leave because they don’t feel appreciated.

In this time of low unemployment and more competition than ever to hire and retain the best and brightest, it’s logical that more and more employers are looking for ways to build a culture of appreciation, and they need to know what a useful strategy that recognition can be.

Some of it is pretty straightforward:

  • Staff members appreciate face-to-face contact.
  • They appreciate someone acknowledging them in a group.
  • They like seeing comments on walls, posted in common areas or the break room.
  • They like that acknowledgment and reinforcement that they’re doing a good job.

From the beginning, we instill that culture of appreciation and recognition in our people. My staff gets in front of people on their very first day of orientation. We are among the first people that talk to new employees. When people take on leadership roles, we are on that agenda too, making sure that those messages about our culture of employee recognition are heard right at the beginning when people enter our system.

This notion of constant reinforcement makes me think of a recent visit that I made to the Homeland Security website, when I was looking into how you can block phone solicitations. On their site they had a big, amazing banner that I wanted to emulate. It said, “If You See Something, Say Something.” I recall thinking that slogan should be the theme for recognition, not just Homeland Security, because that is how effective recognition works. If you see something good, acknowledge it, and because the timing is important, so do it right then.

In my workplace at the Ohio State University, it starts with the medical center placing a value on recognition tools and having a strong statement about our values, wanting to live them and being dedicated to reinforcing them for consistency’s sake. The medical center supports us as a department and we are very active in using our tools, which is of high importance. If you put tools out there and managers don’t use them, it sends a message that people are not valued and it’s not a big part of the culture.

Since not every tool is going to work for every workplace, people have to pick tools that are going to make sense in their organization. You can’t just pick up a complete toolkit and expect it to work in every setting. For example, our medical center has over 20,000 people in different sites, so we do have a business partner provider who provides a place that people can go for consistency. This allows people to do e-cards across the system to communicate.

One thing we consistently communicate and coach is the need for people to take the time and reach out, either by rounding or writing personal notes. To that end we had hundreds of notecards printed and they’re available any time anyone needs more. It is one way we try to remove obstacles to the personal encounters.

We try to represent the Ohio State brand with all of our tools. So for example, some of our nomination-based awards are tied to our values. We have a lot of pride in OSU, so there are many things we can build from that way, and we’ve found that things branded with OSU are hugely popular among our people, so that works here. We talk about the Buckeye Spirit and living the values of our organization. There are many things we tie together this way.

I don’t use the term consistency lightly.  When a manager vows to get better at recognition, they also need to take a vow of consistency. If they work on recognition for one or two days or try it out for a week and then quit, the next time something amazing happens with no recognition, a person will be hurt that they weren’t recognized. Consistency is vital.

As a leader of an organization, I believe that you have to emulate the behavior that you want to see from others. To create and maintain a strong culture of recognition, you have to work directly with front-line managers and the people who are going to be the positive enforcers of this. They are the people who will get the tools, and the effort will live or die right there, depending on whether or not the tools are used effectively. You can’t just give them tools and say, “Go!” You have to constantly coach and reinforce how to use them as well. Through efforts like leadership academy and ‘lunch-n-learn’ events, we share useful strategies and talk to them about their needs.

One of my favorite examples of an effective recognition tool is our Bravo Emergency Box. We are a big operation with several inpatient hospital units and someone may call us on a Friday afternoon, after a rough day, and ask us to do something for staff morale. The manager needs something on the spot in their hands immediately. With this in mind, we created the Bravo Emergency Box, which is filled with tchotchkes like sunglasses, stress balls, lip balm and lots of candy. We wrapped them up in what looks like crime scene tape. Each manager has one of these boxes in their office and if something good or bad happens, they can pull this box out in an emergency. All they need to do is tell us why they used it and they will get another box. Instead of a manager having to buy pizza out of their own pocket or something, they have this in their hands and it is brand-supported. It is a simple and easy thing we do.

We have done significant organizational coaching of our leaders, making sure they visit the second and third shifts to do rounding and make people know they are important. We have leaders who do rounds on holidays to let employees know they’re appreciated. It takes all of us to make this work. We also work to ensure that every member of the team, from top to bottom, is recognized for good work. There is no segregation of celebrations here. An award could go to one of our neurosurgeons, or to the person who removes scuff marks from the floors. They could get the same honor based on what they do, not comparing each other’s skills. We feel that shows the spirit that we are all one, and that is important because it takes all of is to make this work.

In contrast to the need for consistency in recognition, I see great value in variety when telling recognition stories. It is important to look at all the different ways we can communicate, and learn which communication tool is the right one to use for a particular message. You can’t effectively communicate everything across all platforms, because people tend to start seeing it as white noise and delete it. So we try to be strategic about what form of communication makes the most sense, and then we monitor the open rates of those different communication tools to see what is working. It’s not just one things that works every time, it’s a constant balancing act and we’re always trying to see what we need to do to get better and what we need to try next.

Taken all together, we like to think of what we do as the Buckeye Way of creating that culture of recognition.

# # #

Amy Hurley is the Faculty and Staff Recognition Program Director at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center in Columbus, Ohio. She is the RPI’s president-elect.

Tags:  culture  day to day recognition  health care employee engagement  peer to peer recognition  Recognition Strategy 

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Peer to Peer Recognition Leads to Changing Behaviors and Builds Engagement

Posted By Sue Yoemans, Tuesday, September 18, 2018

By Susan Hall, CRP, Corporate Engagement and Community Development, Gateway Mortgage Group LLC

Susan Hall

Showing appreciation in the work place isn’t just for management to their employees. It’s important to recognize fellow co-workers who you feel go out of their way to help you or even observe helping others in some way.  Recognizing your co-workers sets the scene for building a culture of appreciation in the work place. It allows others to see how work life can be at your company.  A thank you note can go a long way as we know and why not share great things! It can become infectious. It builds confidence and engagement. Peer to Peer Recognition is one way your company can tell its story when it comes to creating a positive environment and strengthening culture.

4 Ideas to Start Peer to Peer Recognition Today:

  1. Shout out boards
    Shout Out Board Shout Out Board Comment
    This is an informal program that we have created and we have one on every floor in our building. Once the boards are full, we do a random drawing and give away movie tickets. Although we do not promote the prize, it is fun to do a random drawing and the employees do not expect it. We created note cards with thank you phrases on card stock and change them out when we run out. We even created a fun video to announce the program, the winners and read the cards out loud. We want our employees to hear what we are saying about each other.

    Here is our latest shout out board (youtube)

  2. Spot Light Award
    This is a formal peer to peer nomination form. This could be an employee who changed the way we do business by improving innovation and efficiency.
  3. Kudo (Candy) Grams
    Remember these from middle or high school? We sell candy grams twice a year. We deliver these with a granola bar or healthier treat with notes from peers. The money we collect goes towards our adopt-a-school or a nonprofit the company has a relationship with.
  4. Get to know me scavenger hunt
    We like to celebrate Customer Service week with a “Get to Know Me Scavenger Hunt.” We ask questions that support our employees’ interests. They share their findings at our huddles. You think it’s not recognition, but when you read out loud that a fellow employee wrote a bestselling novel or speaks three languages, you’re recognizing not only their accomplishments but sharing their story. Why always make it work related? Have fun with this, it can open doors to skill sets, add value to your team and helps others appreciate what they can bring to a team. Employees want to share their interests.

When peer to peer recognition is acknowledged, it just gives me the chills thinking about how simple it can be. Peer to Peer recognition leads to changing behaviors and builds engagement in our company! Ultimately changing how we work and improving our culture.

Learn more about RPI’s 7 Best Practice

Tags:  Recognition Events and Celebrations  Recognition Program Communication Plan  Recognition Strategy 

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