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Recognition in The Real World
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Reporter on the Scene: Demonstrating and Elevating the ROI of Recognition Programs

Posted By Rebecca Wegscheid, Wednesday, April 24, 2019
Updated: Monday, April 22, 2019

Reporter on the Scene: Demonstrating and Elevating the ROI of Recognition Programs

At the 2019 RPI Annual Conference Dr. Charles Scherbaum shared something that many recognition professionals experience; most organizations invest considerable resources into employee recognition programs, but a vast majority underutilize their recognition programs as a strategic tool that can help elevate their performance. Throughout his presentation “Demonstrating and Elevating the ROI of Recognition Programs”, Dr. Scherbaum discussed how recognition analytics can be used to link employee recognition program data to key business outcomes like employee engagement, customer experience, or sales to formulate return on investment (ROI). Applying recognition analytics to an employee recognition program can help organizations clearly understand how the ROI can be enhanced by developing managers and employees to be more effective at recognition. 

Key Session Takeaways

Effective managers create effective programs. Mangers are the key to making recognition programs work. By training managers individually on their needs and weaknesses they create better appreciation at work, better customer loyaty and better performance. ROI can be established when effectiveness is tied to employee, customers and business ourcomes.

Putting it into Practice/Aha-Moments

Since managers are the key to making a recognition program work, the focus needs to be on training managers on an individual basis on how to produce better experiences for recipients. Measuring the ROI of your program will then come next. Based off the information from Dr. Scherbaum, you can do this by utilizing the perspective of the recipient, not the manager. Using this frame, you will be able to measure recognition ROI by frequency, velocity, reach, authenticity over time.

 

Reporter on the Scene

Donna Mitsos

Innovation Meetings

 

Tags:  recognition  recognition strategy  ROI on recognition strategy  RPI conference 

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Reporter on the Scene: What can Higher Education Teach Your Company about Recognition?

Posted By Rebecca Wegscheid, Thursday, April 18, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Reporter on the Scene: What can Higher Education Teach Your Company about Recognition?

At the 2019 RPI Annual Conference, Brenda Naegel of Yale University, Iryna Leonova of the University of Calgary, and Cori Champagne of MIT presented an insightful presentation to attendees focusing on what higher education can teach us about recognition. Throughout their presentation the team highlighted how to build, promote and measure a recognition program along with how to navigate any challenges along the way.

Key Session Takeaways

By taking attendees through the “recognition lifecycle” from building a program in house, to including a diverse workforce, measuring impact and evaluating results, the presenters provided some great insights into crafting a recognition strategy that fits your company or organization. Some key points that I will be utilizing in my work are:

  • A “one size fits all” strategy just will not work when it comes to recognition programs because for each program the audience varies.
  • Getting your leaders on board at the beginning is crucial. Once you have your leadership bought into the program, they can cascade the recognition message.
  • Measuring the success of your program is an on-going process. Maintaining clean reporting and analytics will help you communicate the value of the program and identify any potential areas for improvement.

Putting it into Practice/Aha-Moments

I really enjoyed this presentation by the team of Brenda Naegel, Iryna Leonova and Cori Champagne. I think my biggest takeaway was something all recognition professionals know, but should be reminded of from time to time, “Recognition is important to all businesses and organizations”. The key is to not utilize a recognition strategy just because it worked for someone else but make it unique and your own to meet your goals.

 

Reporter on the Scene

Vicki Hargrove

Hargrove Business Consulting 

Tags:  Higher Education  Recognition  Recognition Strategy  RPI conference 

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Planning Underway (Already) for 2018 RPI Conference

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Friday, August 4, 2017

From first-time attendees to long-time veterans of the trade, RPI consistently receives great feedback on its annual conference. The gathering held in late April and early May on this year in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., was a continuation of that trend, with folks heading home from the Sunshine State with great things to say about the gathering.

“This was my first RPI conference, but it will not be my last,” said Beth Baroody, the reward and recognition coordinator for George Mason University in Fairfax, Va. “To have to opportunity to learn from and network with others in the growing field of recognition was invaluable. I made contacts with speakers and attendees who have been a resource even after the conference.”

The 2018 RPI Conference is still more than 250 days away, but planning and preparation for the gathering has begun already. The venue is shifting from the ocean (Florida) to the Opry (Tennessee), with the conference beginning on April 29, 2018 at the Loews Vanderbilt Hotel in Nashville. And while the program will again feature an amazing lineup of speakers and sessions, it also presents an opportunity for participants like you to be part of the show.

RPI invites you and your team to submit a topic for consideration as a conference breakout session speaker. The presentations generally focus on strategies and tactics to motivate employees through recognition, program measurement and performance improvement. We look for first-hand stories of company/organizational benefits of a recognition program, and related topics, and place great value in people with on-the-job experience in what works and what needs work to tell their stories. Attendees are looking for real-world stories and want to know what you’re doing in your company. You will have the opportunity to share your expertise and experience plus the ability to enhance your professional credibility while serving the profession. In the coming weeks we will be telling first-hand stories from past conference presenters and attendees, how the information offered and gained was a benefit.

The deadline for presentation proposals is October 30, 2017, and much more information can be found on the RPI website.

And if you have not already done so, mark your calendar and make plans to attend the conference, which runs from April 29 to May 1, 2018. There are many new and exciting format changes coming and we fully intend for this to be our best conference ever. Also, look for new super saver registration rates for early registration which will open in September.

Tags:  7 Best Practices  recognition strategy  RPI conference  workplace engagement 

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