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Recognition in The Real World
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5 Key Recognition Strategy Components

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, August 7, 2019

RPI's 7 Best Practice Standards® are designed to aid in the creation and evaluation of recognition programs in the public and private sectors, large and small organizations, and organizations with single or multiple locations or functions. Standard 1, The Recognition Strategy, provides purpose for how employee recognition encourages the organization’s goals and objectives. The following five components can be used to evaluate your organizations recognition strategy.

Recognition Strategy

The organization has a written recognition strategy that articulates the philosophy and objectives for all recognition practices, including day-to-day, informal, and formal recognition programs. The recognition strategy provides purpose and direction for how employee recognition encourages and rewards specific employee behaviors that advance the organization’s goals and objectives. All recognition activities are aligned with the mission and culture of the organization. Does your recognition strategy:

  1. Link to the organizational vision, mission, and values?

  2. Provide day-to-day, informal and formal recognition activities?

  3. Have documented procedures?

  4. Include specific and actionable objectives?

  5. Utilize continuous improvement through feedback and measurement?

Tips

  1. There is a formal, written recognition strategy that supports the organization’s strategic goals. Behaviors are identified with recognition program and practices and employees are rewarded for demonstrating those behaviors.
  2. The Recognition Program has day-to-day, informal and formal recognition activities. Actions are specific, timely and meaningful for all.
  3. Recognition related procedures (dimensions, nominations, award selections, taxes, event planning, budgeting, tracking, team, evaluation, etc.) are documented and available across the organization. These procedures are regularly reviewed and revised as needed.
  4. Leaders are involved in setting the recognition strategic objectives which are directly linked to the organization’s strategic goals. There is a regular review of the actions and the impact on the strategy.
  5. The Recognition Strategy includes how the effectiveness will be evaluated and in what timeframe. The Recognition Life Cycle is used to determine what action needs to be taken based on the feedback and measurement.

Read more about RPI's 7 Best Practice Standards® here: https:// www.recognition.org/page/ best_practice

Tags:  organizational development  Recognition Strategy  RPI  RPI Best Practices 

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RPI Success Stories: Cleveland Clinic

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Founded nearly a century ago, in 1921, Cleveland Clinic has grown from a small surgical practice into one of the world’s most renowned names in healthcare. From its base in Ohio, Cleveland Clinic now has facilities in three states and three countries, with over 1,400 beds.

Known as a great place to go for care, Cleveland Clinic is also renowned as a great place to work due to its top-level employee recognition program. The clinic received the RPI Best Practices® Overall Excellence Award in 2015. In its participant guide entitled “Building a Blueprint” RPI took a closer look at Cleveland Clinic’s methods of assessing and improving its employee recognition programs in this case study:

Assessment

Cleveland Clinic currently utilizes the annual employee engagement survey to gauge employee satisfaction with recognition programs. The scores for the Q4 question on recognition have increased year over year from 3.26 in 2009 to 3.95 in 2013, while at the same time employee engagement and patient satisfaction scores are on the rise. These indicators, along with the high utilization of the program, point to the overall satisfaction with the recognition program.

Recognition Strategy

Driving change is a challenging task for any organization. In 2010, Cleveland Clinic, with over 43,000 employees—including 3,100 physicians and scientists and 11,000 nurses—embarked on a remarkable journey; the creation and roll out of an enterprise-wide employee recognition program called Caregiver Celebrations.

Driven by a passion for patient-centered care, the clinic embraced a new vision statement, “Striving to be the world’s leader in patient experience, clinical outcomes, research and education.” While physicians and nurses are the primary caregivers in any hospital, the increased focus on the total patient—and not just the patient’s clinical outcome—drew attention to the vital role played by other hospital employees. Thus the new organizational imperative, “we are all caregivers.”

Caregiver Celebrations, which is a part of the Total Rewards strategy, is a recognition program that is designed specifically to drive the clinic’s overall mission of “Patients First,” improve employee engagement, and ultimately, deliver world class care to patients. Fundamentally grounded in Cleveland Clinic’s core values, Caregiver Celebrations is built upon a rewards and recognition technology platform that enables recognition to flow to and from key stakeholders, including staff, patients, and supporting partners.

Extremely flexible and easy to use, Caregiver Celebrations uses totally customizable programs and powerful analytics to deliver robust recognition tools, highly reliable metrics and continually fresh award experiences.


The Cleveland Clinic case study is included in the course materials in the Certified Recognition Professional program. For more information on CRP certification, please visit http://www.recognition.org/?page=crp_certification. To view a webinar on CRP, click here.

 

Tags:  culture  employee appreciation  RPI Best Practices  Workforce recognition 

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