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Recognition in The Real World
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How to Write a Recognition Questionnaire and Recognize Employees the Way They Want

Posted By Ava Ewald, Thursday, February 13, 2020
Updated: Thursday, February 13, 2020

RPI developed their 7 RPI Best Practice Standards® based on expert knowledge, academic literature and a wealth of experience in growing and developing successful recognition programs. Standard 1 is Recognition Strategy and Standard 2 is management responsibility. These two standards are especially important to consider when developing your strategy for recognition. Below is how you can craft a recognition questionnaire to ensure that you are recognizing employees the way they prefer.

 

Scott Russell, Director of Engagement Strategies at C.A. Short Company and Executive Vice President of RPI discussed the importance of tailoring your recognition strategy to each employee in the Essential Recognition Leaders for webinar. He suggested that one great way to do this is through a recognition questionnaire.

 

What is an employee recognition questionnaire?

Texas A&M University published their recognition questionnaire and stated that their purpose for the form is to “assist supervisors and managers with their employee recognition efforts.” Essentially, the goal of the form is to gather your employees’ preferences on how they like to be recognized.

 

Why are they helpful?

Having your employees fill out a form with foods/drinks/activities they like and how they like to be recognized means that you gather that information quickly, as figuring out these preferences through conversation would take a significant amount of time. You can then keep this information on file and refer back to it whenever you need. These forms may also be a form of recognition on their own- allowing your employees to feel cared for and heard.

 

What to include:

1)      Important dates/anniversaries. Make sure that there are sections of the questionnaire for their work anniversary, marriage anniversary, birthday or any other important dates they want you to know about. Celebrate these days with them.

2)      What they enjoy being recognized for. Maybe one employee has a hard time participating in team projects and would like to be recognized for working with others. Every employee is proud of different aspects of their work. Make sure you celebrate with them when they accomplish something that challenges them.

3)      How they like to be recognized. Some employees love being recognized in front of the whole team, while other more introverted employees may not enjoy this as much. For rewards, some may value opportunities such as face time with a manager or paid time off. Make sure that you take the time to recognize each employee how they like being recognized to show that you care that much more.

4)      Favorites. This is the fun part. Make sure to collect employees’ favorite snack, candy, restaurant, flower, store, dessert, sports team, etc. Having this information on file for each employee will make recognizing them much more fun and personal.

5)      Allergies/restrictions. Bringing in a team lunch from a local barbecue place is not fun for the employee who does not eat meat. If you have the information available, you can make sure that a group reward is equally fun for everyone.

6)      Additional comments. Of course, leaving an empty space for additional comments allows employees to voice thoughts and ideas.

7)      Recognition log. Put in a log on the back of the document or keep it separately so you can keep track of who has been recognized and when.

 

Using your employees’ answers:

Once you have collected the questionnaires, take the time to look through them on your own or with your recognition team. Consider planning out when you will recognize certain employees and any supplies you will need for that event/employee. Come up with a short-list of restaurants that suit everyone that can be catered.

 

To learn more about RPI’s 7 Best Practices click here.

Check out our new resource hub here!

To gain access to Essential Recognition for Leaders with Scott Russell and Theresa Harkins, click here.

 

 

Tags:  employee recognition  engagement  RPI 7 Best Practices  survey 

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A Simple Breakdown of Recognition

Posted By Ava Ewald, Thursday, February 13, 2020
Updated: Friday, February 14, 2020

RPI’s mission is to educate about recognition. Its 7 Best Practice Standards® lay out the framework to successfully implement recognition practices in your organization. Standard 1 of the 7 Best Practice Standards is Recognition Strategy. In order to form your strategy, read below for a simple breakdown of what recognition is.

 

According to Human Resources Director magazine, “Strategic employee recognition is when appreciation is shown for an action that has helped improve the employee or customer experience in a way that supports the organization’s values, purpose or objectives.” To better understand recognition, we will break it down into what it is and what it is not.

 

What it is:

1)      Consistent

Forbes explains that a well-build recognition program should make engaging in recognition simple, so it does not take much effort to keep it going when things get busy. Consistency is key to building a great recognition program as it becomes engrained into the company culture. It also tells your employees that they should expect recognition when they are on the right track.

2)      Individualized

Harvard Business Review suggests that recognition should be tailored to the person you are recognizing. Some people like being recognized in from if their peers, while some prefer a quiet “thank you” at their desk. It may also help to know your employees’ preferences on things like restaurants and activities. Consider sending out an appreciation form like this one from Texas A&M University to your employees to gather this information and have it on file.

3)      Reflective of Organizational Values

HBR says that recognition is the perfect opportunity to reinforce the values of your organization. Identify what behaviors represent those values and make a point of consistently recognizing them. Praising these behaviors often communicates company values to employees better than newsletters and speeches.

 

What it is not:

1)      Vague

According to Forbes, it is important to be specific when recognizing someone. While employee of the month awards are great, they fail to address what the employee specifically did right. When you begin to recognize specific behaviors, you will see them repeat.

2)      Passive

HBR gives the example of a manager who gives out a $25 restaurant gift card every quarter. While consistent, the manager is failing to be active in recognition. Take some time to recognize each person or team differently based on what they like and what they have done to warrant praise. It should always feel genuine.

3)      Difficult

If you do not have much time to spare, recognition can be as simple as “Hey Jenn, thanks so much for going the extra mile for our client this morning.” It is all about these genuine interactions between you and your employees.

 

To learn more about RPI’s 7 Best Practices click here.

Check out our new resource hub here!

 

Tags:  engagement  recognition  RPI 7 Best Practices 

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How to Write a Great Employee Engagement Survey

Posted By Ava Ewald, Thursday, February 13, 2020

 RPI is at the forefront of employee engagement practices, developing the 7 RPI Best Practice Standards® based a wealth of knowledge collected from academics, industry leaders and conferences. These standards are designed to help grow your organization’s recognition program.

Standard 1 is Recognition Strategy and the second is management responsibility. Both are essential in growing engagement in your organization. Harvard Business Review suggests that surveys are one of the greatest ways to make your employees feel heard.

Built In, an online technology news platform recently published a comprehensive guide to creating an effective employee engagement survey. Here are some of the best takeaways:

 

1.      Identify a goal for your survey

Consider what you would like to see change as a result of your survey. Do you want to see more enthusiastic interactions with clients? Would you like to see more teamwork between employees? Make sure there is a clear direction to your survey.

·         Tailor your questions to fit your goal. Where you see areas that need growth, make sure they are addressed on the survey to get your employees’ take on those areas.

·         Keep track of these goals. Growth can not be achieved without measurement to inform change.

2.      Avoid yes/no questions

Simple yes/no questions do not fully explore a person’s opinion or feelings on the question at hand. It does not give room for explanation. For example, “are you happy at work?” could warrant a vast range of responses and opening up the question will give you more thoughtful responses and better insight.

·         Remember who, what, when, where, why and how. These question starters will help you get the responses you want.

·         Putting open-ended questions on your surveys gives your employees the space to articulate their opinions and feelings in a detailed and thoughtful way.

3.      Utilize Scaled Questions

Contrasting open-ended questions, scaled questions can be a great way to get quick results or mix up questions types within a larger survey.

·         These questions are often a 5- or 10-point scale, giving a range of 1- “very unsatisfied” to 10- “very satisfied,” for example.

·         Built In suggests that in general, answers on a 10-point scale ranging 8-10 are positive and 1-4 means improvement is needed.

4.      Analyze your results

A survey does not mean anything if you do not utilize the information you gathered to inform change. Once your survey is completed, take the time to sit down and carefully review the results.

·         Compare your results to industry standards. Decision Wise compiled the results of many engagement surveys so you can see how your results stack up against others. This article also has ideas for survey questions.

·         Create a plan to implement the ideas you received in the survey. When your employees see real change from their feedback, they will be encouraged when completing additional surveys in the future.

 

To learn more about RPI’s 7 Best Practices click here.

Check out our new resource hub here!

 

Tags:  employee engagement  recognition  RPI 7 Best Practices  survey 

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Practical Ways to Implement Engagement Practices Today

Posted By Ava Ewald, Thursday, February 13, 2020
Updated: Thursday, February 13, 2020

RPI is at the forefront of employee engagement practices, developing the 7 RPI Best Practice Standards® based a wealth of knowledge collected from academics, industry leaders and conferences. These standards will help in growing your organization’s recognition program.

Standard 1 is Recognition Strategy and the second is management responsibility. Both are key in growing your recognition program and driving engagement. Below are some simple ways you can grow engagement today.

1.      Emphasize your company’s purpose

Why does your company exist? This is a great question to revisit to reinforce your company’s mission. It also defines purpose, which according to Forbes helps employees perform better because they are confident in what the mission is and how they contribute to it.

·         Harvard Business Review suggests envisioning an inspired workplace. Think about how to connect your employees to the overall mission and identify concrete actions you can take to get them there. Finding a positive example of an inspired employee can demonstrate what you are looking for.

·         Make sure your employees know and understand why your company exists and continue to reinforce the message. This can be done in a weekly newsletter, repeated frequently in meetings or posted in highly trafficked areas of the office.

·         Lean into your inspired staff. Have them help you spread your message and give you feedback on what more you could do.

2.      Set Goals for your teams

A study done by Harvard Business Review Analytic Services found that both individual and organizational goals are strongly tied to an organization’s success. Setting goals with your teams reinforces your mission and drives engagement.

·         A Gallup study found that only 13% of employees believe that their employers set clear goals, which often leads to low engagement. However, Gallup also found that 72% of employees that had goals communicated to them are engaged.

·         On the Clear Review Blog, Stuart Hearn wrote that collaborative goals are crucial when fostering engagement. Setting individual goals shows that one employee contributes to the goals and purpose of the company.

·         Hearn also suggests revisiting goals. Check in with your employees and make sure they feel comfortable with their work as they move toward the goal. Communication is key.

3.      Create an engagement survey

One of the best ways to foster engagement is simply to ask! Create an engagement survey in order to analyze and measure engagement in your office.

·         Survey Monkey posted on their websitebusinesses not only should measure employee engagement—they can’t afford not to.” Engagement translates to more effort, happiness, and profit. Measuring engagement via a survey allows you to track your progress.

·         Bamboo HR recommends against using yes/no questions in your surveys. Give your employees the space to express how they feel about the company and how it works.

·         There are plenty of templates online, so you do not even need to take the time to write your own survey. For example, check out the survey by Bamboo HR here.

4.      Come up with a routine for consistent recognition

We know recognition is a key factor in employee engagement and building it into a regular routine will help you create an even more positive, engaged company culture.

·         Andre Janus, CEO of Cristaux International suggests that employers are missing key opportunities to recognize their employees if they do not do it on a daily basis. Find little things to recognize your employees for each day.

·         Janus recommends adding recognition to your daily to-do list as it should be just as important as any other business task. This could be as simple as a tweet or Facebook post about a top performer or a drop-in chat at an employee’s desk.

·         Set recognition goals for yourself. For example, one could decide to recognize three employees a day. As we know, setting goals are key to producing results. Make recognition one of your goals and watch the engagement that follows!

 

 

To learn more about RPI’s 7 Best Practices click here.

Check out our new resource hub here!

 

 

Tags:  employee engagement  engagement  practices  recognition  RPI 7 Best Practices  strategy 

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3 Takeaways: What Can Higher Education Teach Your Company about Recognition?

Posted By Kathie Pugaczewski CRP, RPI, Friday, January 24, 2020

3 Takeaways: What Can Higher Education Teach Your Company about Recognition?

From the RPI January 2020 Webinar presented by Brenda Naegel, Yale University; Iryna Leonova, University of Calgary; and Cori Champagne, MIT. 

1. Be Thoughtful in Setting Up Your Recognition Program

  • Proper set-up sets the stage for a great recognition program. First, you should know what you want from your program. Are there specific goals you would like to meet? Would you like to see staff more energized? Be sure to begin your program with a goal in mind.
  • Utilize your “recognition champions.” Pick a member of your staff who you believe is already great at motivating or recognizing others. Allow them to help you in creating your recognition program.
  • Get organized. Create a schedule for when you will roll out your program and when you will hold informational meetings for your participants.

2. Measure Your Program’s Success and Evaluate the Results

  • It is hard to have a successful recognition program without being able to measure your progress. 
  • Keep track of your website’s traffic, how many users you have and more. 
  • Evaluate your progress weekly, or even daily, in order to see potential areas of growth.

3. Communication Is Key

  • Analyze what your participants’ and audiences’ needs are. Are they always on the go? You may need to focus on optimizing your webpage for mobile phones. 
  • Frequently check in on your website. Make sure that there is not a registration form open for an event that already happened. Update the website with winners of an award soon after the event. Details and recency are key to a great website.

Practitioner members and Business Partners get complimentary access to this webinar on-demand in the Learning Center along with 50+ other webinars and assets to drive your recognition strategy.
 
Read more about RPI's 7 Best Practice Standards®
Register for upcoming webinars here: https://www.recognition.org/events/event_list.asp 
 


Tags:  education  employee recognition  recognition programs  recognition trends  RPI 7 best practices 

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5 Components for Recognition Training Plans

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, September 4, 2019
Updated: Wednesday, October 16, 2019

Recognition Plan Training

Standard 5 of RPI's Best Practices®, Recognition Training, is essential in creating a culture of appreciation. All employees, especially managers and leaders, need to understand the importance of meaningful recognition and how to give it. The organization's Recognition Training Plan should document how training is designed and administered for managers and employees at all levels, including the training objectives, methods, audience, frequency and measures. The following training plan components are crucial to the success of the recognition training plan.

  1. Identify Recognition Program related topics (how to use program and/or skill building)?

  2. Select target audience for each recognition topic?

  3. Choose training topic delivery methods appropriate for each audience?

  4. Determine frequency of training (one-time, on-going, periodic)?

  5. Measure how effective the training was applied on the job?

Tips

  1. A framework is used to analyze, design, develop, implement and evaluate what training is needed. Recognition topics are included in general training such as safety, leadership, and job specific.
  2. Training includes targeted and specific audiences. All levels of employees receive recognition training and apply what they learn
  3. The plan includes a variety of delivery methods based on the geographic, cultural, and specific needs of the targeted audience.
  4. The plan spells out when training is offered.
  5. Reaction and application evaluation are checked to determine changes needed to make the training more effective. Results-

Read more about RPI's 7 Best Practice Standards® here: https:// www.recognition.org/page/ best_practice

Tags:  employee recognition  employee recognition program  recognition training  RPI 7 Best Practices 

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Why it’s important to recognize employees and how you can plan the perfect celebration

Posted By Administration, Wednesday, June 5, 2019
Updated: Monday, June 3, 2019

Why it’s important to recognize employees and how you can plan the perfect celebration

Engaged employees are an important asset to companies today and it’s no secret why.

According to The Ultimate Guide to Employee Recognition by Achievers and RPI’s CRP program, “Engaged employees perform 20% better and are 87% less likely to leave their organization”. It doesn’t stop there though. Higher rates of engagement among employees also correlate to a more profitable and productive company.

So, what is the best way to drive employee engagement?

Recognition. The study Employee Performance: What Causes Great Work found that “94% of respondents who were exposed to an excellent recognition practice perceived it to be ‘very effective’ at causing them to produce great work”.  Especially with this statistic, there is no reason to not give employees the recognition they want and deserve.

Based on RPI’s Seven Best Practice Standards, the most successful programs are balanced and provide a combination of day-to-day, informal, and formal recognition. While day-to-day and informal are more spur-of-the-moment and less structured, formal recognition requires extensive planning and can be overwhelming.

It doesn’t have to be though. Virginia-based technology company and RPI Best Practice Overall award-winner BAE Systems has proved just how stress-free formal recognition can be. Illustrated through BAE Systems, here are five tips to help you plan the perfect celebratory formal event to recognize employees:

1.     Pick a date and make sure it’s timely

One of the necessary first steps to take in planning a celebration to recognize employees is to set a date for the event. Do this well in advance to allow enough time to plan it. Make sure that it does not conflict with religious, work, or school holidays, and that the employee is being recognized at an appropriate time. BAE Systems celebrates service anniversaries and birthdays as part of their recognition strategy, ensuring the events are held in a timely manner.

2.     Create an event plan

The plan should include everything related to the event such as the goals, branding, sponsorship, and venue logistics. Having a master plan will help organize the planning process and will ensure a smooth celebration.

3.     Have an events team

Planning an event takes a lot of time and effort. Having a team dedicated to organizing the event, details, and logistics can help make sure it is a success.

4.     Give the award to reinforce beneficial behaviors

Successful employee recognition programs reflect the values of the company. Employees who are recognized should behave in a matter that upholds these values, acting as a model for others. When recognizing employees, BAE Systems uses their core values as a guide and honors those who are:

a.     Trusted to deliver on commitments

b.     Innovative in finding and turning ideas and technologies into solutions

c.      Bold in accepting new challenges and managing risks

5.     Make the event specific to the individual

If an employee is being recognized, others should know why. Explain the importance of their work or behavior, and do so in a way that is meaningful. To go the extra mile, include the employee’s family by inviting them to the celebration. BAE Systems does this by offering multiple awards that recognize employees’ individual achievements and contributions to projects and programs.

Employees value recognition, no matter the size of the gesture. It’s important to incorporate formal recognition and events, but don’t let event planning get the best of you. With these tips, you’re on the way to creating the perfect moment that they will cherish forever.

Learn more about BAE Systems and their award-winning recognition strategy.

Event planning and celebrations are only one of RPI’s Seven Best Practice Standards. Learn about the others here.

Want to learn more about employee recognition? Checkout RPI’s Certified Recognition Professional® (CRP)/Recognition program to expand your knowledge, excel in your job and maximize your recognition program.

Tags:  Employee Engagement  Formal Recognition  Recognition Strategy  RPI 7 Best Practices 

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Learn from the best, tips from MIT on building employee engagement

Posted By Kathie Pugaczewski CRP, RPI, Monday, October 29, 2018

Each year, companies are spending almost $750 million per year on engagement. Companies know that creating an engaged culture is important, but the problem is that the spend is not being returned with only 50% of the potential market has been tapped, with only half of the organizations stating an interest in engagement programs actually investing.

So the question needs to be asked, how can you increase employee engagement and create a recognition culture within your organization?

In 2016, RPI awarded Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or MIT as it is better known as, the top award amongst recognition professionals, the RPI Best Practice Standards® Award. The institute began their award winning recognition program in 2001. Prior to this, the Institute was seen by staff as a “praise free zone”. So how in the span of 15 years did the Institute create a major internal cultural shift and build a recognition program that continues to grow? The answer lies within the seven RPI Best Practice Standards®.

Make it robust (Standard 1: Recognition Strategy)

By creating a robust recognition strategy, MIT was built a recognition program that has legs. A multi-tiered model approach, like the one used at the Institute, allows leaders and employees to provide rewards and recognition for all levels of behavior. As we know, recognition does not always have to mean a large ceremony every time an employee or coworker does something worthy of recognition. Instead, building daily “on the spot” awards into a program allows for flexibility and authenticity to the awards. Making the accomplishments measurable ends credibility to the program and removes questions of favoritism, a plague that we know can sink a recognition program in an instant.

Top Down Buy In (Standard 2: Management Responsibility)

To kick start their program, MIT tapped into their senior leaders and staff to be their program champions. From the start, they were included in the development and roll out of the program. Senior leaders and managers serve as key role models by encouraging attendance and presenting at the recognition events, and utilizing the program themselves. Often times, these leaders make up half or close to half all of the “on-the-spot” awards submitted and are frequent nominators for the larger awards.  

Train, Teach, and Train again (Standard 5: Recognition Training)

The MIT model does not only work because of it’s multi-tiered approach to recognition, but because at the start of their employment with MIT, staff are trained on the program. Throughout their careers, MIT provide staff with additional trainings on the program and ample opportunities to be involved in planning of the large year end event. There are articles and tools readily available to all staff and employees on the program and an intranet site dedicated solely to the program creating a single location for all program information.

The MIT Recognition program is a phenomenal example of a program that is built to last. These are only 3 of the key ways the MIT program has grown into an adaptable and award winning part of their culture.

Read more about MIT’s award

Learn more about the 7 best practices for building your recognition program and how you can become a certified recognition professional.

Tags:  employee engagement  employee recognition  employee retention  MIT  RPI 7 Best Practices 

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RPI 7 Best Practices® 2016 Overall Winner MIT Shares Their Management Strategy

Posted By Sue Yoemans, Monday, April 23, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, April 24, 2018

RPI Planning Phases/Recognition Strategy Model


Massachusetts Institute of Technology – Senior Leadership and Recognition

MIT has 32 individuals in senior leadership roles across the Institute.  They may be leading departments with under 100 staff members, or heading entire schools with staff in the thousands. Regardless of the size of the department, lab, or center, MIT’s senior leaders are aware that recognition is, in part, modeled in their participation in the program. Their involvement is evidenced in the full cycle of the program; from initiating policies to presentation of recipient awards.

To ensure that the recognition program would be adopted throughout all areas of MIT, the originating Committee worked collaboratively to build a program - and consensus. With buy-in from senior leaders, the Recognition Committee established a network of 24 Key Contacts across MIT, and a recognition budget for each of the 24 areas based on head-count in various areas.  These structures and designated administrators have meant that senior leaders are involved where they are most needed: communicating and encouraging the use of the program by staff, as seen in their involvement in the communications effort. MIT’s President Reif annually sends an email to every staff member and student at MIT, promoting the nomination period for the MIT Excellence Awards + Collier Medal, and later – encouraging attendance at the ceremony, which he opens and presents several of the awards.

Senior leaders and managers also serve as role models by encouraging attendance and presenting at recognition events, and utilizing the program themselves, by submitting nominations for formal or informal recognition.  Managers and senior leaders frequently utilize the option to give staff Spot Appreciation awards, and in many areas their submissions make up half or close to half of all Spot awards submitted.  Managers and senior leaders are frequent nominators for Infinite Mile and Excellence awards as well.

Managers and senior leaders are always involved in the presentation of DLC Infinite Mile awards, and for the Excellence Awards and Collier Medal.

 

Tags:  employee recognition strategy  Management responsibility  RPI 7 Best Practices 

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Standard Success Stories: RBC’s Recognition Strategy

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Tuesday, January 9, 2018
Untitled Document

Note: RPI’s Seven Best Practice Standards are the cornerstone of successful employee recognition and rewards programs. In 2018, we are taking a closer look at each of the seven standards and RPI members who have been recognized for their practice of those standards. In the first installment, we take a look at Recognition Strategy, and the award-winning way that RBC practices this standard. The RPI Best Practice Awards nominations are now open for nominations through February 1, 2018.

RBC, based in Toronto, was a recipient of the Overall RPI Best Practice® Award in 2017, and is a shining example of how to do recognition strategy right. From their award-winning entry, they offer several samples of the ideas and actions behind their recognition strategy efforts.

All of RBC’s recognition and reward programs under the RBC Performance brand align with their Purpose, Vision and Values to become a leader in financial services wherever in the world they serve customers. That vision and those values help drive their recognition programs and are part of the criteria within the RBC Performance recognition and reward program.

RBC Performance, which is their flagship program, was launched in 1993 as a sales incentive points reward and recognition program and now serves over 75,000 employees. Among the core points of the program are:

  • Day-to-Day Recognition – RBC associates give and receive recognition to and from their peers and from retail branch managers and regional leaders on a regular basis.
  •  InstantThanks – RBC’s social recognition program permits employees so say thanks and send commendation comments and recognition for demonstrating our values and excellent customer service.
  • Branch Huddles – These happen before the bank door opens. Here customer service and product information is given. Managers and team members weave in recognition as often as they can.
  • Informal Recognition – RBC Performance is a comprehensive recognition system dedicated to improving RBC’s financial and service performance results.
  • RBC Performance Nominations and Awards – Employees can recognize individuals and teams who consistently go beyond expectations and make a difference in the business. RBC employees can nominate a colleague or team with RBC Performance’s online nomination feature. Nominations are based on RBC’s values and other key behaviors, and are expected to focus on outstanding performance in these categories. Managers select nominations based on merit and can award point values to send to the employee. The number of nominations and awards received contributes to selecting who attends the RBC Performance Conference.
  • Scratch ‘n Win Cards – Managers can give these cards for on-the-spot recognition. Employees virtually “scratch” a bar online to reveal a point value or the chance to be entered into a monthly draw.
  • Sales Campaigns – Managers in retail banking can recognize and reward employees and teams with points for achieving highest sales or service activities in any quarterly sales campaign.

The company also believes in more formal recognition, with a series of events and awards:

  • Leo Awards – This is RBC’s Academy-award-style celebration event. Employees who showcase the very best in sales, service or support are recognized at a special event during the RBC Performance Conference with “The Leo” Award. Regional leaders select Leo Award recipients from RBC Performance Conference recipients.
  • RBC Performance Conference – This is the best-of-the best annual conference for RBC’s top performers. Each region has a set number of eligible nominees to select. Quarterly Point Award winners are eligible candidates. Regional presidents and senior leaders choose conference attendees from across all roles. Conference winners are announced at each Regional Gala event. Each awardee receives a registration package to attend the Conference.
  • RBC Service Awards – Employees receive a choice of a gift award item on their milestone anniversary at two, five, 10, 15 years and in five-year increments up to 50-year level.

The results have not only been award from RPI, but recognition of RBC as one of the best places to work in Canada. For more information on RBC and their success with Recognition Strategy, please visit the company culture website at: https://www.rbc.com/careers/people-culture-awards.html

Tags:  employee engagement  formal recognition  RBC  recognition  recognition strategies  RPI 7 Best Practices  Strategy  success stories  Toronto 

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