This website uses cookies to store information on your computer. Some of these cookies are used for visitor analysis, others are essential to making our site function properly and improve the user experience. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Click Accept to consent and dismiss this message or Deny to leave this website. Read our Privacy Statement for more.
Search | Print Page | Your Cart | Sign In | Join Now
Recognition in The Real World
Blog Home All Blogs

RPI 7 Best Practices® 2016 Overall Winner MIT Shares Their Management Strategy

Posted By Sue Yoemans, Monday, April 23, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, April 24, 2018

RPI Planning Phases/Recognition Strategy Model


Massachusetts Institute of Technology – Senior Leadership and Recognition

MIT has 32 individuals in senior leadership roles across the Institute.  They may be leading departments with under 100 staff members, or heading entire schools with staff in the thousands. Regardless of the size of the department, lab, or center, MIT’s senior leaders are aware that recognition is, in part, modeled in their participation in the program. Their involvement is evidenced in the full cycle of the program; from initiating policies to presentation of recipient awards.

To ensure that the recognition program would be adopted throughout all areas of MIT, the originating Committee worked collaboratively to build a program - and consensus. With buy-in from senior leaders, the Recognition Committee established a network of 24 Key Contacts across MIT, and a recognition budget for each of the 24 areas based on head-count in various areas.  These structures and designated administrators have meant that senior leaders are involved where they are most needed: communicating and encouraging the use of the program by staff, as seen in their involvement in the communications effort. MIT’s President Reif annually sends an email to every staff member and student at MIT, promoting the nomination period for the MIT Excellence Awards + Collier Medal, and later – encouraging attendance at the ceremony, which he opens and presents several of the awards.

Senior leaders and managers also serve as role models by encouraging attendance and presenting at recognition events, and utilizing the program themselves, by submitting nominations for formal or informal recognition.  Managers and senior leaders frequently utilize the option to give staff Spot Appreciation awards, and in many areas their submissions make up half or close to half of all Spot awards submitted.  Managers and senior leaders are frequent nominators for Infinite Mile and Excellence awards as well.

Managers and senior leaders are always involved in the presentation of DLC Infinite Mile awards, and for the Excellence Awards and Collier Medal.

 

Tags:  employee recognition strategy  Management responsibility  RPI 7 Best Practices 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Don’t Get Skunked: The Health Risks of a Dysfunctional Workplace

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Friday, June 9, 2017
You come home from the stereotypical “bad day at the office” feeling like you need a drink to calm down. You eat a big meal – bigger than normal – to take some comfort and forget about the stresses of the workplace. That night, you have trouble getting to sleep, replaying the previous day’s workplace stress in your head. Happens to all of us, right?

If that happens routinely, you might be getting “skunked” by a dysfunctional boss, or a dysfunctional workplace. That’s the term coined by Brad Shuck, an associate professor in the University of Louisville’s Department of Educational Leadership, Evaluation and Organizational Development has coined for bad workplaces that literally can be hard on your health.

If you’ve ever come across a skunk in the wild and felt the full brunt of their natural defense mechanism, you know what a smelly situation it creates. You let off an odor that affects those around you, and you need help and time to get that stench off.

The effects on your long-term health from working in a challenging environment can be similary damaging.

“Think about incredibly high stress, high pressure work environments,” Shuck said in a recent radio interview. “The mechanisms that people use to cope with that stress – excessive drinking, overeating, a lack of exercise – can directly contribute to long-term health problems like diabetes and high blood pressure.”

Shuck, a renowned expert on employee engagement, is co-author of a study on the topic entitled “Skunked: An Integrative Review Exploring the Consequences of the Dysfunctional Leader and Implications for Those Employees Who Work for Them.” He developed the term, along with co-authors Dr. Kevin Rose, Dr. Matt Bergman and Dr. Devon Twyford. In the study, they noted that somewhere between 13% and 36% of employees in the United States work with a leader whose approach could be described as dysfunctional.

That’s trouble, not only for the employee, but for the company when you consider long-term healthcare costs.

“The essential idea is this: when you work in a place that is dysfunctional, meaning high chronic stress and lots of negative things going on, that impacts your long-term health,” Shuck said. “Leaders who work in these kinds of places are called ‘stinky’ leaders.”

Shuck jokes that “stinky” is not exactly an academic or highly technical term, but sees it as fitting.

“A dysfunctional boss will do the same to their employees as a skunk does to people in the wild,” Shuck said. “It takes a real effort and intentional healing to move on from a dysfunctional work situation.” The good news is that for the first time, research by Shuck and others is able to show a real return on investment for companies who intentionally develop engaging places to work. If employees are engaged, feel appreciated and are happier at work, they’re healthier. Productivity and profitability go through the roof. Higher levels of engagement equates to better workplace health.

As Shuck notes, even for a medium-sized company, the potential savings in healthcare costs alone run into the millions.

So if those bad days at work are becoming more frequent, and leading to unhealthy behaviors, he stresses that employers and employees alike should be aware, and make sure they’re not getting skunked in the workplace.

Tags:  Culture  Human resources  Leadership  Management responsibility 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Recognition Professionals International

1000 Westgate Drive, Suite 252
St. Paul, Minnesota 55114
Phone: 651-290-7490 | Fax: 651-290-2266 | info@recognition.org
© 2018 Recognition Professionals International. All Rights Reserved.