Search | Print Page | Your Cart | Sign In | Join Now
Recognition in The Real World
Blog Home All Blogs

Standard Success Stories: BAE Systems Recognition Strategy

Posted By By Jess Myers, RPI, Friday, January 19, 2018

Note: RPI’s Seven Best Practice Standards are the cornerstone of successful employee recognition and rewards programs. In 2018, we are taking a closer look at each of the seven standards and RPI members who have been recognized for their practice of those standards. In the first installment, we take a look at Recognition Strategy, and the award-winning way that BAE Systems practices this standard. The RPI Best Practice Awards are now open for nominations through February 1, 2018.

BAE Systems, based in Arlington, Virginia, was a recipient of three Best in Class awards:

  • Standard 1- Recognition Strategy
  • Standard 4 - Communication Plan
  • Standard 7 - Program Change and Flexibility

BAE Systems takes pride in its recognition strategy programs. From their award-winning entry, they offer several samples of the ideas and actions behind their recognition strategy efforts.

Employees at BAE Systems participate in IMPACT, a company-wide program to recognize and reward employee accomplishments. It is tied to the company’s Total Performance culture and their company values: trusted, innovative and bold. IMPACT’s goal is to make it easy to recognize employees for making an impact on their business.

They measure day-to-day recognition through the IMPACT program. The company’s non-monetary “Rave” award is a special thank you for employees who take on additional responsibilities to help another employee.

Informal recognition is also measured through the IMPACT system via the Pioneer award, which rewards those who have contributed to a team or project or other achievement in a way that aligns to the company’s aforementioned core values. Pioneer awards range in value from $25 to $250 and are based on business-related criteria. The company also offers informal recognition via service anniversaries, birthdays and celebrations like company picnics.

BAE Systems also supports a robust formal recognition program, offering three possible rewards:

  • Pathfinder recipients lead or contribute to a project, program or achievement that aligns t the core values. These awards can range from $500 to $10,000 and are measured through IMPACT.
  • Trailblazer recipients lead a team on a significant project or program with significance that aligns to the company’s core values. These awards can range from $10,000 to $50,000 and are measured through IMPACT.
  • Chairman’s Awards are further broken down into three categories that recognize and celebrate the work of BAE Systems employees in:
    • Business Leader Award
    • Executive Committee Award
    • Chairman’s Gold Award

The basis for all the awards is the core values that BAE Systems identifies and promotes. They seek employee behavior that is:

  • Trusted to deliver on commitments
  • Innovative in finding and turning ideas and technologies into solutions
  • Bold in accepting new challenges and managing risk

The results have shown not only been award from RPI, but in celebration of their awards programs and strategy. For more information on BAE Systems, the Chairman’s Awards and their success with Recognition Strategy, please visit the company culture website at: https://www.baesystems.com/en/our-company/about-us

Tags:  7 Best Practice Standards  7 Best Practices  recognition strategies  success stories 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Revamped CRP 1 Now Live for On-Line Learners

Posted By By Jess Myers, RPI, Thursday, December 21, 2017
Untitled Document

The world of employee recognition is constantly changing and evolving, so it makes sense that the renowned education program designed with employee recognition in mind – the popular Certified Recognition Professional® courses – are changing with the times.

It’s that need to be up-to-date and relevant which led to a major revamp of all of the courses in the past year and the final changes to CRP 1 are now complete. Hargrove was part of the team that set to work over the summer remaking CRP 1 – the first of the program’s four sections – and their efforts are now live, having been completed in the late fall.

CRP 1 was the program’s first course, designed to introduce the principles and best practices of recognition. It had gone online several years ago, and after they had revamped CRP 2, 3 and 4, a team led by Rita Maehling and including Hargrove and Dee Hansford felt in order to reflect the new information and new materials included in the newly-developed on-line portion of the program, revisions were needed.

CRP 1 is the foundation for the certification courses. It is an overview method that introduces the entire process. So the revisions ensure that participants are getting the most current thinking in the recognition area.

“We divided and conquered. Dee took the actual on-line slide and I did the learning guide,” Hargrove said of the lengthy and thorough revision project. “She pulled in some existing slides, some slides from the other courses and she also worked with the narration to get the voice talent. Once she had identified the slides’ content, I went through and developed a learning guide to accompany the course.”

The idea was to create a new CRP 1 learning guide that a person can download and use as a reference while they are going through the course and after the course as well. The team included general things like a glossary, references and places where participants can find additional information so that it will be useful beyond just going through the on-line course. It was a necessary change.

“It was not in alignment with the other three courses, and since CRP 1 is the prerequisite for 2, 3 and 4, we wanted to make sure that the information was current and aligned with the new information in 2, 3 and 4,” Hargrove said. “The RPI 7 Best Practices® didn’t change. That’s the standard. But the supporting information and the content that was included in the new 2, 3 and 4 had changed, so we wanted to make sure we were bringing in as current information as we could.”

For example, there are several surveys that different organizations do on an annual and bi-annual basis. They referred to those studies and offered a reference so that people can go back each year and get the newest study information.

And by having the course on-line, people can learn at their own pace, although Hargrove admits there are advantages to both on-line and classroom learning.

“From a participant perspective, on-line courses are certainly more convenient in that you can do it in your own time. The pros are the time commitment, because you can come back to the course, finish a little bit and come back to do more, and you can go over things as many times as you like,” Hargrove said. “In a facilitator-led course you have the advantage of other people who are in a similar position as you, being able to discuss different challenges and how other people handle those challenges.”

She added that the team of Rita, Dee and Vicki did great work together.

“It’s always enjoyable to work with them and get a project done,” Hargrove said. “We hope it will be of value to the participants who are going through CRP. Even if they just take CRP 1 I think it will give them a good foundation of how to organize their own recognition program or how to modify an existing recognition program.”

For more information about the CRP program, please visit www.recognition.org/crp_certification. CRP 2 and 3 will be offered at the RPI Conference in Nashville in April, 2018.

Tags:  7 Best Practices  Certification  CRP  education  online learning 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

CRP Success Story: Jami Young, Asurion

Posted By By Jess Myers, RPI, Wednesday, October 18, 2017
Untitled Document

The mantra of life-long learning is alive and well in Jami Young, CRP. A senior manager of customer solutions engagement at Nashville-based Asurion, Young completed her CRP certification nearly a decade ago. But through the many resources available in the employee recognition world, her skills are in a state of constant updating.

If you own an insurance policy on your smartphone, there’s a good chance you’re an Asurion customer. The company, with around 10,000 employees in the U.S. and Canada, offers technology insurance policies. Young handles rewards and recognition for their call center operations and had been there for two years.

“I was able to come in and implement a system of measurements and involve our executive leadership in recognition,” Young said. “I needed to make sure we’re able to change as the business changes. I had training that was very conceptual, and now that I’m in it I see the importance of the structure involved in the recognition strategy model. When you’re in this role it’s such a collaborative effort and you have to able to show value at every step. I feel like CRP training was a huge driver  in that.”

Her CRP journey began nine years ago in Texas as Inspirus, where she worked with Theresa Harkins.

“Because Theresa was a certified trainer, we actually got to do CRP certification on site, which was really cool,” Young recalled. “That was my first jump into CRP training and I loved it. I feel it taught me a lot about why my customers were the practitioners of recognition, why it was important, how you show value to the rest of your organization and then how you start from scratch.”

Nearly a decade later, Young uses what she learned in the CRP program regularly.

“If I get in a rut, I have all of my CRP notebooks on hand and I’ll pull them out,” she said. “If I have to create a communications plan or a training program, I’ll pull out my CRP notebooks to see what the industry says and what my training says about the best practices in those areas.”

And the information available from RPI is an additional wealth of continuing education.

“I go to the RPI website all the time. There are really great whitepapers and presentations that you can review to see what other teams have done,” she said. “When it comes to this industry there are a lot of different ways of doing things. I’m not a HR professional, I’m an employee engagement professional. I’ve been on the operation support side of things, but I can get a lot of great information about what other companies do to drive recognition from the RPI website.”

A regular attendee at the RPI conference, Young said that with experience comes a propensity to tell colleagues about CRP certification and what a benefit it’s been in her career successes.

“It’s always going to be a part of what I do,” Young said. “I drank the Kool-Aid about recognition a long time ago so any chance I get I’ll push the certification to help people think about how they provide value. I think of CRP as a great way of helping strengthen our team. I want others to drink the Kool-Aid as well and I think RPI is a great way to do that.

 

Tags:  7 Best Practices  CRP  employee engagement 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Planning Underway (Already) for 2018 RPI Conference

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Friday, August 4, 2017

From first-time attendees to long-time veterans of the trade, RPI consistently receives great feedback on its annual conference. The gathering held in late April and early May on this year in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., was a continuation of that trend, with folks heading home from the Sunshine State with great things to say about the gathering.

“This was my first RPI conference, but it will not be my last,” said Beth Baroody, the reward and recognition coordinator for George Mason University in Fairfax, Va. “To have to opportunity to learn from and network with others in the growing field of recognition was invaluable. I made contacts with speakers and attendees who have been a resource even after the conference.”

The 2018 RPI Conference is still more than 250 days away, but planning and preparation for the gathering has begun already. The venue is shifting from the ocean (Florida) to the Opry (Tennessee), with the conference beginning on April 29, 2018 at the Loews Vanderbilt Hotel in Nashville. And while the program will again feature an amazing lineup of speakers and sessions, it also presents an opportunity for participants like you to be part of the show.

RPI invites you and your team to submit a topic for consideration as a conference breakout session speaker. The presentations generally focus on strategies and tactics to motivate employees through recognition, program measurement and performance improvement. We look for first-hand stories of company/organizational benefits of a recognition program, and related topics, and place great value in people with on-the-job experience in what works and what needs work to tell their stories. Attendees are looking for real-world stories and want to know what you’re doing in your company. You will have the opportunity to share your expertise and experience plus the ability to enhance your professional credibility while serving the profession. In the coming weeks we will be telling first-hand stories from past conference presenters and attendees, how the information offered and gained was a benefit.

The deadline for presentation proposals is October 30, 2017, and much more information can be found on the RPI website.

And if you have not already done so, mark your calendar and make plans to attend the conference, which runs from April 29 to May 1, 2018. There are many new and exciting format changes coming and we fully intend for this to be our best conference ever. Also, look for new super saver registration rates for early registration which will open in September.

Tags:  7 Best Practices  recognition strategy  RPI conference  workplace engagement 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Four Things You Need in Your Recognition Marketing Plan

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Monday, June 26, 2017

From his base of operations in Toronto, Jason Thomson thinks differently about employee recognition because he comes at it from a different place. The chief instigator for Jigsaw, Thomson comes to the trade from a background in marketing, and takes a marketing-based approach to the employee engagement world.

Thomson stresses that successful recognition marketing plans need four key considerations, and he broke them down by asking four key questions in a webinar he presented for RPI recently. Your plan does not need to be complex or overly crazy, but it can benefit from having a goal, investing in the right channels, developing interesting messages, and focusing on the language that is used most effectively.

Goal (Or, “What are we trying to prove?”)

Start by determining what you want your marketing to do. You may want to build your brand, or drive usage of your recognition program, or make the program more relevant, or drive financials. Make your goal specific, make it measurable and make it attainable. Base your goals on your past research and on your current initiatives. Think of your goal like the bullseye on a dart board. The strategies you use to hit that goal are like your darts.

Channels (Or, “Where can we put it effectively?”)

When trying to reach an internal audience, be creative. Thomson has used multiple unique and visible channels to reach employees, including table tents, stickers, floormats and banner ads. Think hard about placement, about which channels will be most effective in meeting those predetermined goals. Then be smart about the “where” of your message. It’s also important to look for influencers within your organization – Thomson equates it to the “cool kids’ table” in the school lunchroom and use them to spread the word.

Messages (Or, “How do we say it?”)

When you’re developing content, be consistent. Thomson stresses the importance of making a plan, in the form of an editorial calendar, and sticking to that plan in a consistent way. He likes monthly themes, which get people involved, but change often enough that they keep people interested. And the best way to keep people interested is simply to be interesting, so take some time to brainstorm on messages that will catch and keep the attention of the target audiences.

Language (Or, “Which words can we use most effectively?”)

Each office, each industry, has its own lexicon of terms that mean one thing to a certain group of people. Focus on those words, and how to make the most of them in getting your message across. That includes deciding on a style for your organization (which words get capitalized, for example) and a word menu of terms to use effectively and terms to avoid. And Thomson stresses the effective use of talking points – those one-sentence messages that effectively convey what you’re trying to say, and that reinforce the message.

For more information, please visit the RPI website at Recognition.org. Premium Practitioner Members and Business Partners get full access to almost 30 on-demand webinars. Basic Practitioner Members which is free get limited access to webinars.

Tags:  7 Best Practices  Communication strategy  marketing 

Share |
PermalinkComments (0)
 

Thank You, Business Partners

Recognition Professionals International

1000 Westgate Drive, Suite 252
St. Paul, Minnesota 55114
Phone: 651-290-7490 | Fax: 651-290-2266 | info@recognition.org
© 2018 Recognition Professionals International. All Rights Reserved.