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Recognition in The Real World
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10 Tips to Help Make Professional Training More Exciting

Posted By Rachel Niebeling CRP, Tuesday, September 18, 2018

By Rachel Niebeling, CRP, E Group, Inc.

Professional. Development. Training. The mere thought can strike boredom in even the most academic of hearts.

“61% of workers said their employers are providing upskilling opportunities in the technical and soft skills of the future, only 50% said their employers provide career development opportunities that meet their needs and chances for advancement. (Access Perks)

Companies who boast engaged workers outperform those without engaged workers by 202%, according to a Dale Carnegie study. Clearly, training and learning opportunities at work are a pretty important factor. So how do we help cure the workforce of the “snoozefest” stigma associated with training? How can we possibly make professional training more exciting?

Fear not, training managers! Below, we share with you our proven tips to make professional training more exciting, thus driving employee engagement.

  1. Provide Variety
    Personalities learn and engage differently. With modern technology, it’s easy and affordable to offer a variety of training and learning opportunities at work. For example, a webinar led by a subject matter expert (SME) can be offered live for groups and individuals, and then can be archived for a self-paced learning experience later.
  2. Offer Clarity
    Learners need clear learning objectives shared prior to registration. This helps individuals decide if the topic is truly interesting or useful, as well as focused on specific learning objectives. Clarity also keeps presenters on track.
  3. Have a Good Team
    In order to make professional training exciting, you must deploy a team effort. You also must have the right team. GovLoop, a resource for public sector professionals, has put on hundreds of online trainings. They suggest having a moderator, an SME and backend support. It’s important to have an SME that’s a good facilitator who keeps the topic interesting. Humor and plain language are great tools!
  4. Facilitate Engagement in Training
    It’s important to create an emotional connection with the learner. Storytelling is a great way to facilitate engagement in training. Case studies are a great way to tell a story and show impact.
  5. Gamification
    Gamification is a #buzzword. There’s a reason the Twitterverse is abuzz with gamification… It works! There are many strategies to implement gamification, and it’s proven to work. Ask your current platform provider about their capability for gamification.
  6. Make it Interactive
    If gamification isn’t in the cards, find other ways to make professional training exciting. In an online training, try weaving in poll questions and sharing the results immediately. In a live training, call on people from the crowd. Also, always make sure to leave time for Q&A. Finally, get rid of the text heavy slides and add some graphics.
  7. Reduce the Time
    No one wants to sit through a full day of training, especially online. If you need more than an hour, break it down into shorter sessions and offer breaks. Make sure to leave 10-15 minutes in between each section.
  8. Make the Connection
    Make a connection between each training and job performance. Provide context and relevancy by choosing the right content. Employees need to know what to do after the training and how to connect it with their role. It’s important to define and communicate expectations and objectives.
  9. Get Managers Onboard
    In order to make the connection, manager support and participation is critical. According to a BizLibrary infographic, 49% of disengaged employees are due to problems with direct supervisors. Managers can support learning by encouraging participation and setting a good example. Managers should also seek results from trainings and give recognition.
  10. Community and recognition
    Use social and collaboration tools to build company culture around training. Social tools can help with relationship building, enhance information flow and promote the sharing of ideas. They also provide a platform for recognition both peer-to-peer and manager-to-employee.

    Bonus: Follow up for learning effectiveness. The best training in the world will be wasted if there is no follow up. Follow up with tip #8, make a connection with employee objectives.

Keep up the good work, training managers! Now that you have a few additional tricks to increase engagement during trainings, you can decide which ones to try during your training sessions.

About The Author
Rachel Niebeling, CRP, is Sr. Director, Training, Rewards & Engagement with E Group. She is dedicated to building best practice engagement programs and has a passion for making your work day better.

Tags:  career development  employee engagement  employee training 

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Peer to Peer Recognition Leads to Changing Behaviors and Builds Engagement

Posted By Sue Yoemans, Tuesday, September 18, 2018

By Susan Hall, CRP, Corporate Engagement and Community Development, Gateway Mortgage Group LLC

Susan Hall

Showing appreciation in the work place isn’t just for management to their employees. It’s important to recognize fellow co-workers who you feel go out of their way to help you or even observe helping others in some way.  Recognizing your co-workers sets the scene for building a culture of appreciation in the work place. It allows others to see how work life can be at your company.  A thank you note can go a long way as we know and why not share great things! It can become infectious. It builds confidence and engagement. Peer to Peer Recognition is one way your company can tell its story when it comes to creating a positive environment and strengthening culture.

4 Ideas to Start Peer to Peer Recognition Today:

  1. Shout out boards
    Shout Out Board Shout Out Board Comment
    This is an informal program that we have created and we have one on every floor in our building. Once the boards are full, we do a random drawing and give away movie tickets. Although we do not promote the prize, it is fun to do a random drawing and the employees do not expect it. We created note cards with thank you phrases on card stock and change them out when we run out. We even created a fun video to announce the program, the winners and read the cards out loud. We want our employees to hear what we are saying about each other.

    Here is our latest shout out board (youtube)

  2. Spot Light Award
    This is a formal peer to peer nomination form. This could be an employee who changed the way we do business by improving innovation and efficiency.
  3. Kudo (Candy) Grams
    Remember these from middle or high school? We sell candy grams twice a year. We deliver these with a granola bar or healthier treat with notes from peers. The money we collect goes towards our adopt-a-school or a nonprofit the company has a relationship with.
  4. Get to know me scavenger hunt
    We like to celebrate Customer Service week with a “Get to Know Me Scavenger Hunt.” We ask questions that support our employees’ interests. They share their findings at our huddles. You think it’s not recognition, but when you read out loud that a fellow employee wrote a bestselling novel or speaks three languages, you’re recognizing not only their accomplishments but sharing their story. Why always make it work related? Have fun with this, it can open doors to skill sets, add value to your team and helps others appreciate what they can bring to a team. Employees want to share their interests.

When peer to peer recognition is acknowledged, it just gives me the chills thinking about how simple it can be. Peer to Peer recognition leads to changing behaviors and builds engagement in our company! Ultimately changing how we work and improving our culture.

Learn more about RPI’s 7 Best Practice

Tags:  Recognition Events and Celebrations  Recognition Program Communication Plan  Recognition Strategy 

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Recognition Drives Employee Engagement at the University of Calgary

Posted By Sue Yoemans, Monday, August 20, 2018
By Elena Rhodes and Iryna Leonova on behalf of the University of Calgary

How to build a culture of recognition if you have more than 5,000 employees and your workforce is incredibly diverse? The University of Calgary approached this challenge by creating its Employee Recognition Strategy. The initiative is focused on recognizing individual and team behaviors and achievements which support university’s strategic goals and core values, while promoting a positive and respectful workplace.

However, creating a strategy is not enough. The university formed a dedicated recognition team in Human Resources to lead management of the strategy. It was also essential to find advocates across the organization to support its further development, implementation, and evaluation.

Three groups of recognition advocates help build a culture of recognition. The first one is the Employee Recognition Steering Committee. This committee of representatives from diverse employee groups worked on the Recognition Strategy. Following that, the Steering Committee has been guiding the strategy implementation. The Recognition Steering Committee is also responsible for using available resources, such as the information from a recognition preferences survey, to provide guidance on what recognition programs and practices are relevant to the employees. The recognition team collaborates with the Steering Committee in developing best practice recognition programs, education, and communication.

Local engagement or recognition committees in various faculties, schools, and departments represent the second group. Given that the University of Calgary is very diverse, the same practice will not fit all. The local committees help tailor university-wide recognition programs and practices to the units’ and faculties’ culture, goals, and unique landscape. The recognition team supports local committees through an ongoing consultation process.

Finally, the third group is the Employee Recognition Champions Network. The Network is a relatively new group created through an open call. Recognition champions are faculty and staff who are committed to acknowledging the great work that is happening across campus through formal recognition programs and informal recognition practices. Local recognition committees often provide a representative for the Recognition Champions Network. 

The champions learn about a variety of recognition tools and programs that are available at the university and exchange ideas among each other. They aim to promote effective recognition practices in their faculty or unit – individually or as part of a committee – with focus on peer-to-peer recognition. They also help the recognition team with feedback on recognition tools, practices, and programs and information on challenges and successes in their areas. The recognition champions meet bi-monthly to learn about recognition and exchange ideas. Between meetings, they communicate through a dedicated SharePoint site.

Together, these three groups of advocates provide robust guidance to the recognition team. They also help develop recognition into a grass-root culture campus-wide. The recognition advocates help build connections between different groups of employees, and create flexible and sustainable recognition programs and practices.

To learn more about this RPI award-winning initiative, please visit the University of Calgary website at https://www.ucalgary.ca/

The University of Calgary won the RPI Best Practice Standards® Award in 2018 form Recognition Professionals International (RPI). The RPI Best Practice Standards® Award honors organizations who implement the RPI Best Practice Standards®, which are based on knowledge gained from academic literature, professional conferences, and shared experiences in developing successful recognition programs. Standards are designed to be useful for the creation and evaluation of recognition programs in the public and private sectors, large and small organizations, and organizations with single or multiple locations or functions.

Tags:  employee engagement  employee recognition  RPI 7 Best Practices(SM) 

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Dr. Paul White: Understanding Negativity’s Roots Helps Keep It Positive

Posted By Jess Myers, Ewald Consulting, Thursday, July 12, 2018

In even the best workplace, and even with the best-executed employee recognition program, it seems that there’s always a naysayer. Negativity is a fact of life, Understanding the roots of negativity in the workplace, how to deal with it and how to counteract it, is important to success in the world of recognition.

Dr. Paul White

Dr. Paul White, a sought-after speaker and leadership trainer, how negativity can affect a workplace. In a recent conversation from his office in the heart of Kansas, he gave some insight on from where it originates, and how it can affect recognition: 

“First we look at what causes negative reactions. These are typically a result of having unmet expectations. You have an idea of what something should be and if it’s not that, you can get frustrated, irritated, hurt, discouraged, angry and all those kinds of things.”

He stresses the important of helping employees have appropriate expectations, because not everyone does:

“Part of that is education about what is reality-based according to your industry, in terms of compensation and bonuses, or your role. That can depend on your geographic location. For example, Wichita is less of a high-dollar kind of place than San Francisco or New York City, so a similar role in the same industry is going to have dollar flows, in and out, that are going to be less.

“Part of it is also an education piece about how your recognition program works, the frequency of how often awards are given, how the decisions are made, and some history and context of how it has worked in the past.”

And when changes are made, be prepared for negativity, even if the changes will be a good thing in the long run:

“Change creates potential challenges. Change takes energy to respond to. So even if it’s a good change, you will have some resistance because people have to get used to it and how it rolls.

“Some people really like predictability. For a lot of people, it gives them a sense of security. If we know we’re going to have pizza for lunch on Friday, I can think about what kind of pizza to have. If we change it and say we’re going to have either pizza or Chinese or Mexican for lunch, it’s a good change, but now you have to think about more than one thing. So sometimes simplicity is preferred because of the emotional energy it takes to process choices.”

Another challenge comes when a person’s expectations about their workplace or about employee recognition are not based in what is realistic:

“At some point you have to examine how reality based are your expectations. Do a little research, talk to people, get some feedback, not in the sense of just getting someone to agree with you, but really try to get some data about it.

“Another question to ask is there some problem solving you can do or some action you can take? There’s a saying that you can either complain about the darkness or you can light a candle. Historically the American way of dealing with a problem is not just to moan about it, but to figure it out.”

And employee recognition programs, which are intended to bring positivity to the workplace, can have the opposite effect if they’re done improperly:

“I find that recognition programs can actually contribute to negativity when they are either poorly conceived, poorly implemented or inconsistently implemented. Inconsistence is deadly because it messes with expectations. You expect something to happen regularly and it doesn’t so you get rewarded sometimes and not others.

“When recognition programs try to use recognition for performance activities – which are good and useful when done well – to try to make a person feel valued individually, it typically doesn’t work. Because it’s about their performance, not them as a person, so it feels very conditional. 

“The reactions to poorly designed and implemented recognition programs can be apathy, where people think ‘they have it but it doesn’t mean anything to me,’ or sarcasm, where people don’t believe it’s genuine or feel it’s political – IT this month and Accounting next month as far as who gets an award. When there’s a lack of trust it leads to sarcasm and cynicism.

His best advice for dealing with negativity is to offer the opposite:

“You should counteract negativity with positivity. That comes in the form of gratitude and thankfulness for what you do have.

“In Wichita today it’s going to be 102 today, so I am thankful for air conditioning. I can complain about the heat, or I can be thankful to have a job where I don’t work outside in these conditions. When people are communicating negatively, you can make positive comments.

“Positive comments in a negative conversation are kind of like throwing water on a fire. The two best ways to combat negativity in the workplace are, 1) don’t contribute to it, and 2) make a positive comment.”

For more information, you can visit www.drpaulwhite.com and learn more about his practice and workplace tips. For more information on developing a strong recognition strategy, check out the RPI Seven Best Practices.

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2019 Call for Board Nominations

Posted By Sue Yoemans, Monday, July 9, 2018

Nominations Open for the 2019 RPI Board of Directors

Due September 6th!

Are you inspired to contribute your efforts, creative ideas and passion to the smooth running and further development of Recognition Professionals International (RPI)? If so, you are encouraged to let your name stand for election to the RPI Board of Directors.

RPI is looking for board candidates with terms beginning January 1, 2019. The election will be held virtually in October and through an online ballot.

Being a board member is an interesting and rewarding job. At monthly meetings throughout the year, including two in-person meetings, you will share ideas and partner with thought leaders in our industry. Your efforts can help make a difference in the well-being of our association and our members.

Qualifications

  • Board terms are a three-year commitment (2019-2021).
  • Candidates should be action-oriented, enthusiastic, honest and hardworking.
  • Active professional practitioner members and eligible business partner members will be considered for candidacy.
  • Board members typically serve as committee chairpersons and/or serve on committees performing various tasks and responsibilities.
  • Ability to travel to two in-person Board meetings.

The board conducts the majority of business via email, telephone and monthly calls. There is no monetary compensation for board membership. However, in recognition of their efforts, board members are offered discounts on the annual conference fee. Board members also have the personal satisfaction that comes from being a part of the action for this wonderful association.

For specific information on the commitment of becoming an RPI board member, click here. Additional information can be found in the RPI by-laws on the RPI website at www.recognition.org.

If the nominating committee calls on you, please consider running for the board. We need people who love the industry and want to learn as much as possible. As well as people who are willing, ready, and able to share their time and talents for the benefit of the industry. If you are not contacted, but have an interest in being considered for the board, please contact rpi@recognition.org. All potential candidates must complete, whether self-nominated or nominated by fellow RPI members must complete, the RPI Nomination Form and sign the Board Commitment Form and return it to the RPI office.

Download Nomination Form

Please email the completed nomination form (Word Format) document to RPI Executive Director, Kathie Pugaczewski, rpi@recognition.org.

Nomination forms are due to the RPI office by September 6, 2018.

If you have any questions, please contact Kevin Cronin at Kevin.Cronin@octanner.com. Thank you for your continued support of RPI.

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RPI Honors BAE Systems & University of Calgary with 2018 Best Practice Awards

Posted By Sue Yoemans, Friday, May 11, 2018

 

BAE Systems and the University of Calgary took home the top honors at the recent Recognition Professionals International Annual Convention in Nashville. It was the first time RPI has had a tie for the top award, as both BAE Systems and the University of Calgary received the honor.

BAE Systems was recognized for embracing RPI’s Seven Best Practice Standards. Like many organizations, BAE Systems applied for the award in the past and last year received three Excellence in Standards awards. BAE Systems has a company-wide program to recognize and reward employee accomplishments, which are strongly tied to their performance and living their cultural values.

The strength of the BAE Systems recognition program comes from the fact that it was designed by its employees and grows because they are vested and have ownership of the program and the tools. BAE Systems regularly and responsibly reviews each program for its responsiveness to employee needs. Their program utilization, which has risen by over 200% in the past four years, has become a key measurement with its executive leadership team and is a part of the organization’s strategic goals for continuous improvement.

The University of Calgary is a first-time award applicant. This organization formed a cross-disciplinary Recognition Steering Committee to guide the development, implementation, and ongoing review of employee recognition in 2013. They did so understanding the key role of recognition in employee engagement, satisfaction, and retention. The Committee set out to create a recognition strategy that aligned with the university’s strategic plan and values – to provide best practice recognition programs, education and communication for all staff. To build the strategy, they used their findings from an Employee Recognition Preferences survey, the analysis of existing practices and programs as well as reviewing  recognition programs at leading universities in Canada and consulting with a third party provider.

RPI judges were impressed with the strategic way the University of Calgary embraced this process. They took the time to create a network of the right organizational champions, they ensured they had great baseline data; their program supports the goals and values of the university, and they created some fun, engaging and well-used tools.

RPI’s Best Practices Judges for 2018 were:

  • Roy Saunderson, Chief Learning Officer at Rideau Recognition
  • Shelley Judges, Senior Manager of Employee Experience for TD Business Banking and a 2010 Best Practice winner
  • Dee Hansford, who has facilitated CRP and been instrumental with two organizations’ being awarded the overall Best Practices Award.
  • Cori Champagne of MIT, the 2016 Best Overall recipient.

Tags:  Awards  Best Practice Standards  Best Practices  employee engagement 

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RPI 7 Best Practices® 2016 Overall Winner MIT Shares Their Management Strategy

Posted By Sue Yoemans, Monday, April 23, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, April 24, 2018

RPI Planning Phases/Recognition Strategy Model


Massachusetts Institute of Technology – Senior Leadership and Recognition

MIT has 32 individuals in senior leadership roles across the Institute.  They may be leading departments with under 100 staff members, or heading entire schools with staff in the thousands. Regardless of the size of the department, lab, or center, MIT’s senior leaders are aware that recognition is, in part, modeled in their participation in the program. Their involvement is evidenced in the full cycle of the program; from initiating policies to presentation of recipient awards.

To ensure that the recognition program would be adopted throughout all areas of MIT, the originating Committee worked collaboratively to build a program - and consensus. With buy-in from senior leaders, the Recognition Committee established a network of 24 Key Contacts across MIT, and a recognition budget for each of the 24 areas based on head-count in various areas.  These structures and designated administrators have meant that senior leaders are involved where they are most needed: communicating and encouraging the use of the program by staff, as seen in their involvement in the communications effort. MIT’s President Reif annually sends an email to every staff member and student at MIT, promoting the nomination period for the MIT Excellence Awards + Collier Medal, and later – encouraging attendance at the ceremony, which he opens and presents several of the awards.

Senior leaders and managers also serve as role models by encouraging attendance and presenting at recognition events, and utilizing the program themselves, by submitting nominations for formal or informal recognition.  Managers and senior leaders frequently utilize the option to give staff Spot Appreciation awards, and in many areas their submissions make up half or close to half of all Spot awards submitted.  Managers and senior leaders are frequent nominators for Infinite Mile and Excellence awards as well.

Managers and senior leaders are always involved in the presentation of DLC Infinite Mile awards, and for the Excellence Awards and Collier Medal.

 

Tags:  employee recognition strategy  Management responsibility  RPI 7 Best Practices 

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RPI Launches New Mobile App Plus Access to Research

Posted By Kathie Pugaczewski CRP, RPI, Tuesday, March 20, 2018

Join the Conversation & Sharing in Our New Member-Only Online Community!

We are pleased to announce that we have launched the Recognition Professionals International Social Link online member community.  

The new community includes an enhanced member profile as well as a mobile app so you can easily connect with your fellow RPI colleagues.

You can expect a brand new way to communicate with colleagues, share information across the RPI network and manage your membership preferences. Finding member information and updates will be easier than ever. Your login information will remain the same, but you will now also have the option to login through your LinkedIn or Facebook credentials.

Here are some key ways you will be connected to the RPI community:

  • With Alerts and Push Notifications, the app provides instant updates about what's happening in the RPI community.
  • Members can access their community feed, connections, member directory and engage year-round.
  • Make membership renewal and event registration easy with a few simple clicks.
  • New clean design of your member profile for easy access to your data and online resources.

Take a tour of the new member features by watching this short webinar.

Start Connecting!

Apple Store Google Play

Need help installing the app to your mobile device? Watch our 2-minute how-to webinar.

Once signed in, you will be directed to your feed, encompassing all activity from other connected members.

Don't miss out on this exciting new update! We look forward to your engagement.

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Bestselling leadership expert and author Chester Elton keynotes at RPI Conference in Nashville

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Real solutions on managing culture change, driving innovation, and leading a multi-generational workforce.

#1 New York Times, USA Today and Wall Street Journal bestsellers All In and The Carrot Principle.

For decades, when your parents wanted you to eat your vegetables, we’ve heard the idea that carrots are good for your vision. Chester Elton is a man renowned for his business visions, which may be one of the reasons he and a business partner have dubbed themselves the Carrot Guys.

Elton, who will be one of the keynote speakers at the 2018 RPI Annual Conference, began his journey as an author and orator two decades ago. Along with writing partner Adrian Gostick, Elton was doing consulting work on employee engagement and recognition. He first hit on the idea of taking what they were learning through their work and making a book out of it. Both men sensed a need for a “bible of recognition and engagement.”

Their biggest challenge was a lack of knowledge about how to get a book published. On their website, Elton and Gostick recall cold-calling a local publishing whose specialty was cookbooks and do-it-yourself manuals.

With a publishing contract that the men signed on a picnic table outside an old barn that had been converted into an office, they wrote and wrote and re-wrote until “Managing With Carrots” was complete. The book came out in 1999 and was a success, selling 40,000 copies in its first year. Since then the duo has written four more books, with increasing levels of success, and have become sought-after experts on workplace dynamics and employee engagement. They’ve moved from a niche publisher to giant Simon & Schuster, and note with some pride that their written works have been translated into 20 languages and are popular on every continent except Antarctica.

In 2010 Elton and Gostick also founded their own consulting and training company, The Culture Works, which focuses on employee engagement, culture and leadership strategies with some of the world’s most renowned corporate names.

Elton, along with renowned author David Sturt, will be the featured speakers at the 2018 RPI Conference, which kicks off April 29 in Nashville, Tenn. Registration for the three-day conference, which includes CRP courses and Recognition Fundamentals is now available here.

Tags:  2018 RPI Conference  employee recognition  Nashville conference 

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Microsoft® a worldwide leader in employee recognition efforts

Posted By Kathie Pugaczewski CRP, RPI, Wednesday, March 7, 2018
Debra Garcia

The chances are, if you're reading this on a computer, Microsoft® has played some role in that effort.The Seattle-based computer software giant is renowned not just for its role in worldwide information technology, but for making Bill Gates one of the best-known humans on the planet. As RPI member Microsoft® Program Manager Debra Garcia shares, Microsoft also makes an impressive investment in ensuring their best employees know they are valued.

"The overall mission of the Microsoft® Rewards and Recognition program is to honor employees through world-class award programs. The purpose is to motivate exceptional performance and collaboration to support and advance the business. The objective is to ensure consistency and equity across segment/geography, enable regional variation and complement existing compensation strategies." says Debra.

Microsoft® Champion Award Program

The Microsoft® Champion Award program recognizes individuals and teams who are competing with a growth mindset, winning transformational deals as One Microsoft®, and focusing on customer and partner obsession. The program supports over 53,000 worldwide sales, marketing and services employees.

Informal recognition includes:

  • E-medallions available for LinkedIn and Outlook signature profiles.
  • Thrive Kudos – internal Microsoft® tool that can be used by any employee to send congratulatory emails to individual winners and copying their manager. The feedback is embedded into the employee's personal site which can be viewed by peers, management, etc.
  • Yammer Praise – an employee can send an internal praise to an award winner. A copy of the email is sent to the recipient's manager and added to their Yammer feed and any other Yammer feeds that are tagged.
  • Highlight and recognize winners at local team meetings.
  • PowerPoint presentations of winners with their achievements, organization, job title, etc. – local award managers can export a custom PPT from the winner showcase and display on office video screens, at team meetings, and more.

Formal recognition includes:

  • A winner announcement email from leadership
  • An executive letter portfolio
  • An invitation to the annual winner celebration reception
  • Award site and winner showcase

Nomination Tool

  • To track nominations and manage the selection process, Microsoft® created a nomination tool using an Azure database backend with winner data from 2004 to current.
  • The tool consists of a nomination form and user dashboards to manage the different user workflows - nominator, reviewer, award manager and program manager. 
  • Anyone at Microsoft® can nominate individuals or teams. 
  • Upon submission, the tool sends an email from the Champion award email alias to the nominee's direct manager with a request to approve or decline the nomination. If declined, the manager must provide a brief explanation. If approved, the nomination continues to move up the management chain until it reaches the final decision maker. At that time, a winner selection committee votes on the nominations and the award manager marks the final winners in the tool.
  • There is rich reporting via Word and Excel.

As one would expect from one of the world's foremost names in communication technology, Microsoft's recognition content is structured for clear and concise messaging, aligned with key company objectives and consistent across all communication platforms. To ensure messaging and branding are consistent, email templates are created for executive and quarterly announcements. The use of templates makes it easy and efficient for award managers to simply add in winners and personalize from the executives prior to sending.

For more information about Microsoft's mission to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more please visit their website: www.microsoft.com.

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