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Standard Success Stories: BAE Systems Recognition Strategy

Posted By By Jess Myers, RPI, Friday, January 19, 2018

Note: RPI’s Seven Best Practice Standards are the cornerstone of successful employee recognition and rewards programs. In 2018, we are taking a closer look at each of the seven standards and RPI members who have been recognized for their practice of those standards. In the first installment, we take a look at Recognition Strategy, and the award-winning way that BAE Systems practices this standard. The RPI Best Practice Awards are now open for nominations through February 1, 2018.

BAE Systems, based in Arlington, Virginia, was a recipient of three Best in Class awards:

  • Standard 1- Recognition Strategy
  • Standard 4 - Communication Plan
  • Standard 7 - Program Change and Flexibility

BAE Systems takes pride in its recognition strategy programs. From their award-winning entry, they offer several samples of the ideas and actions behind their recognition strategy efforts.

Employees at BAE Systems participate in IMPACT, a company-wide program to recognize and reward employee accomplishments. It is tied to the company’s Total Performance culture and their company values: trusted, innovative and bold. IMPACT’s goal is to make it easy to recognize employees for making an impact on their business.

They measure day-to-day recognition through the IMPACT program. The company’s non-monetary “Rave” award is a special thank you for employees who take on additional responsibilities to help another employee.

Informal recognition is also measured through the IMPACT system via the Pioneer award, which rewards those who have contributed to a team or project or other achievement in a way that aligns to the company’s aforementioned core values. Pioneer awards range in value from $25 to $250 and are based on business-related criteria. The company also offers informal recognition via service anniversaries, birthdays and celebrations like company picnics.

BAE Systems also supports a robust formal recognition program, offering three possible rewards:

  • Pathfinder recipients lead or contribute to a project, program or achievement that aligns t the core values. These awards can range from $500 to $10,000 and are measured through IMPACT.
  • Trailblazer recipients lead a team on a significant project or program with significance that aligns to the company’s core values. These awards can range from $10,000 to $50,000 and are measured through IMPACT.
  • Chairman’s Awards are further broken down into three categories that recognize and celebrate the work of BAE Systems employees in:
    • Business Leader Award
    • Executive Committee Award
    • Chairman’s Gold Award

The basis for all the awards is the core values that BAE Systems identifies and promotes. They seek employee behavior that is:

  • Trusted to deliver on commitments
  • Innovative in finding and turning ideas and technologies into solutions
  • Bold in accepting new challenges and managing risk

The results have shown not only been award from RPI, but in celebration of their awards programs and strategy. For more information on BAE Systems, the Chairman’s Awards and their success with Recognition Strategy, please visit the company culture website at: https://www.baesystems.com/en/our-company/about-us

Tags:  7 Best Practice Standards  7 Best Practices  recognition strategies  success stories 

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Standard Success Stories: RBC’s Recognition Strategy

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Tuesday, January 9, 2018
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Note: RPI’s Seven Best Practice Standards are the cornerstone of successful employee recognition and rewards programs. In 2018, we are taking a closer look at each of the seven standards and RPI members who have been recognized for their practice of those standards. In the first installment, we take a look at Recognition Strategy, and the award-winning way that RBC practices this standard. The RPI Best Practice Awards nominations are now open for nominations through February 1, 2018.

RBC, based in Toronto, was a recipient of the Overall RPI Best Practice® Award in 2017, and is a shining example of how to do recognition strategy right. From their award-winning entry, they offer several samples of the ideas and actions behind their recognition strategy efforts.

All of RBC’s recognition and reward programs under the RBC Performance brand align with their Purpose, Vision and Values to become a leader in financial services wherever in the world they serve customers. That vision and those values help drive their recognition programs and are part of the criteria within the RBC Performance recognition and reward program.

RBC Performance, which is their flagship program, was launched in 1993 as a sales incentive points reward and recognition program and now serves over 75,000 employees. Among the core points of the program are:

  • Day-to-Day Recognition – RBC associates give and receive recognition to and from their peers and from retail branch managers and regional leaders on a regular basis.
  •  InstantThanks – RBC’s social recognition program permits employees so say thanks and send commendation comments and recognition for demonstrating our values and excellent customer service.
  • Branch Huddles – These happen before the bank door opens. Here customer service and product information is given. Managers and team members weave in recognition as often as they can.
  • Informal Recognition – RBC Performance is a comprehensive recognition system dedicated to improving RBC’s financial and service performance results.
  • RBC Performance Nominations and Awards – Employees can recognize individuals and teams who consistently go beyond expectations and make a difference in the business. RBC employees can nominate a colleague or team with RBC Performance’s online nomination feature. Nominations are based on RBC’s values and other key behaviors, and are expected to focus on outstanding performance in these categories. Managers select nominations based on merit and can award point values to send to the employee. The number of nominations and awards received contributes to selecting who attends the RBC Performance Conference.
  • Scratch ‘n Win Cards – Managers can give these cards for on-the-spot recognition. Employees virtually “scratch” a bar online to reveal a point value or the chance to be entered into a monthly draw.
  • Sales Campaigns – Managers in retail banking can recognize and reward employees and teams with points for achieving highest sales or service activities in any quarterly sales campaign.

The company also believes in more formal recognition, with a series of events and awards:

  • Leo Awards – This is RBC’s Academy-award-style celebration event. Employees who showcase the very best in sales, service or support are recognized at a special event during the RBC Performance Conference with “The Leo” Award. Regional leaders select Leo Award recipients from RBC Performance Conference recipients.
  • RBC Performance Conference – This is the best-of-the best annual conference for RBC’s top performers. Each region has a set number of eligible nominees to select. Quarterly Point Award winners are eligible candidates. Regional presidents and senior leaders choose conference attendees from across all roles. Conference winners are announced at each Regional Gala event. Each awardee receives a registration package to attend the Conference.
  • RBC Service Awards – Employees receive a choice of a gift award item on their milestone anniversary at two, five, 10, 15 years and in five-year increments up to 50-year level.

The results have not only been award from RPI, but recognition of RBC as one of the best places to work in Canada. For more information on RBC and their success with Recognition Strategy, please visit the company culture website at: https://www.rbc.com/careers/people-culture-awards.html

Tags:  employee engagement  formal recognition  RBC  recognition  recognition strategies  RPI 7 Best Practices  Strategy  success stories  Toronto 

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A Conversation with Outgoing RPI Board Member Rita Maehling

Posted By By Jess Myers, RPI, Tuesday, January 2, 2018
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The New Year will bring changes, as Minnesota-based Rita Maehling is leaving the RPI board – but certainly not leaving the world of recognition professionals – after serving a term-plus. We had a conversation with her about her time with RPI and the industry’s changes over the past nearly two decades.

Tell us a little about when and why you got involved with RPI.

I joined RPI in 2002 when I became an independent consultant. I had a passion around recognition and had actually co-authored a book on the topic in 1990. I wanted to share my experience and continue to work with others, so I was thrilled to find a bevy of like-minded practitioners and service-providers with whom I could learn and contribute.

Initially I was a member at large and then in 2004 I got involved in setting up the certification process. I was a member of the education committee and we presented a proposal to the board which was accepted, to embark on what we now call the Certified Recognition Professional® certification program.

CRP is one of the hallmarks of your time with RPI. How did that start?

I became the instructional designer for the original four courses. That was a paid position that I bid on and was selected. We started with CRP 1 in 2006, then launched CRP 2 in the fall of that year. In 2007 we launched CRP 3 and 4. We selected instructors and continued doing training both at the conference and on-site.

We had lots of opportunity to work with some great people at Rideau and trained 60 of their staff members, which was a huge undertaking for them. We worked with lots of great organizations to bring CRP into their workplaces. It’s been an honor to watch that grow and expand.

Making CRP available online has been a big change. What was your role in that transition?

I served as the project manager on the first conversion of CRP 1 to an online format. Subsequently I worked on all of the online conversions.

It allows people from the comfort of their own home or from their workplace to do self-paced learning and become a Certified Recognition Professional® within probably a third the time of the classroom program.

When did your role on the RPI board start?

I joined the board around 2012 and stayed on for one term, then I filled in for someone who had to roll off the board, so I’ve served for around four years.

I retired from working last year, so I’m kind of scaling down my professional organizational role somewhat. I still plan to remain a member and attend the conference, participating with the education team. I won’t have a leadership role any longer, but I am sure I will be a sideline coach moving forward. From a legacy standpoint, everything is in pretty good shape and people can build on the foundation we started in 2006.

How has the industry changed most significantly during your career?

The technology has been the biggest change, for sure. Everything was paper-based when I started and things were more laborious from an administrative standpoint. The technology has added speed, efficiency and the capability for social media recognition. We’re finding new and great ways to recognize people like internal Facebook pages, for example. Tracking and even fulfillment have changed greatly due to technology. It’s really streamlined and added much ease and capability to the industry.

What are the plusses of serving on the RPI board?

If people are considering a board position, even longer term, I think it’s the best was to leverage your membership, by getting involved in the strategy of the organization. There is such a wealth of knowledge within the board and within the organization itself from myriad perspectives. You have huge organizations like Wells Fargo and Cargill down to the little fish in the big pond. You’ve got government and healthcare and business providers, so everyone brings a different perspective and it really is the melting pot and the pushes all those organizations forward.

From a resume-builder standpoint it looks good to say you’ve been on the board of directors, and it’s great from a professional development standpoint. There are many great benefits to getting more involved.

Tags:  CRP  recognition strategies  RPI board 

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Revamped CRP 1 Now Live for On-Line Learners

Posted By By Jess Myers, RPI, Thursday, December 21, 2017
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The world of employee recognition is constantly changing and evolving, so it makes sense that the renowned education program designed with employee recognition in mind – the popular Certified Recognition Professional® courses – are changing with the times.

It’s that need to be up-to-date and relevant which led to a major revamp of all of the courses in the past year and the final changes to CRP 1 are now complete. Hargrove was part of the team that set to work over the summer remaking CRP 1 – the first of the program’s four sections – and their efforts are now live, having been completed in the late fall.

CRP 1 was the program’s first course, designed to introduce the principles and best practices of recognition. It had gone online several years ago, and after they had revamped CRP 2, 3 and 4, a team led by Rita Maehling and including Hargrove and Dee Hansford felt in order to reflect the new information and new materials included in the newly-developed on-line portion of the program, revisions were needed.

CRP 1 is the foundation for the certification courses. It is an overview method that introduces the entire process. So the revisions ensure that participants are getting the most current thinking in the recognition area.

“We divided and conquered. Dee took the actual on-line slide and I did the learning guide,” Hargrove said of the lengthy and thorough revision project. “She pulled in some existing slides, some slides from the other courses and she also worked with the narration to get the voice talent. Once she had identified the slides’ content, I went through and developed a learning guide to accompany the course.”

The idea was to create a new CRP 1 learning guide that a person can download and use as a reference while they are going through the course and after the course as well. The team included general things like a glossary, references and places where participants can find additional information so that it will be useful beyond just going through the on-line course. It was a necessary change.

“It was not in alignment with the other three courses, and since CRP 1 is the prerequisite for 2, 3 and 4, we wanted to make sure that the information was current and aligned with the new information in 2, 3 and 4,” Hargrove said. “The RPI 7 Best Practices® didn’t change. That’s the standard. But the supporting information and the content that was included in the new 2, 3 and 4 had changed, so we wanted to make sure we were bringing in as current information as we could.”

For example, there are several surveys that different organizations do on an annual and bi-annual basis. They referred to those studies and offered a reference so that people can go back each year and get the newest study information.

And by having the course on-line, people can learn at their own pace, although Hargrove admits there are advantages to both on-line and classroom learning.

“From a participant perspective, on-line courses are certainly more convenient in that you can do it in your own time. The pros are the time commitment, because you can come back to the course, finish a little bit and come back to do more, and you can go over things as many times as you like,” Hargrove said. “In a facilitator-led course you have the advantage of other people who are in a similar position as you, being able to discuss different challenges and how other people handle those challenges.”

She added that the team of Rita, Dee and Vicki did great work together.

“It’s always enjoyable to work with them and get a project done,” Hargrove said. “We hope it will be of value to the participants who are going through CRP. Even if they just take CRP 1 I think it will give them a good foundation of how to organize their own recognition program or how to modify an existing recognition program.”

For more information about the CRP program, please visit www.recognition.org/crp_certification. CRP 2 and 3 will be offered at the RPI Conference in Nashville in April, 2018.

Tags:  7 Best Practices  Certification  CRP  education  online learning 

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Shuck: EVP explores the optimal way to recognize employees

Posted By By Jess Myers, RPI, Wednesday, November 15, 2017
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If you want to win football games, it’s simple. Just look at what Tom Brady does, and do that. If you want to make money, study what Warren Buffet does, and copy it.

If only life worked that way. It does not.

In his recent webinar hosted by RPI, noted recognition expert and researcher Brad Shuck, PhD, notes that copying the practices of what other successful companies have done to reward and recognize employees doesn’t always work. Your efforts are more successful when they are rooted in principles, not practices.

“Recognition is not about parties or casual Fridays, it is an underlying message of value that tells people they matter,” said Shuck, who is an associate professor of human resources and organization development at the University of Louisville.

In his new RPI-sponsored webinar, entitled “New Rules of Recognition: Moments You Can Leverage,” Shuck tells his audience that successful recognition is less about individual initiatives and more about creating a strong winning workplace culture that can be sustained over time.

“There are lots of ways to recognize employees, but what are the optimal ways to do it?,” he asks early in the presentation, then proceeds to answer his own question.

Shuck believes strongly in the concept of Employee Value Proposition (EVP), which asks why a talented person would choose to work in a given workplace. EVP puts the responsibility on the employer, not the employee, and it strongly encourages not only getting talented people in the door, but keeping them engaged once they are in the door.

He states some important numbers related to EVP, noting that 93 percent of employees who feel recognized and appreciated say they will go above and beyond on behalf of their employer and 91 percent are unlikely to leave.

“EVP breeds and fosters creativity, and encourages employees to give their best ideas,” he said. And creativity is at the heart of his call for a principle-based strategy around employee recognition. It’s easy to look at a renowned company like Google, which famously offers employees three meals per day and has offices with rooms for gaming and napping, but that model is not one that every office can easily or practically replicate.

By objectifying the practices of other companies, Shuck feels you may miss the human element, hence his call for focusing more on principles and establishment of organizational culture rather than focusing on the practices that others use to attract and retain good people.

The full webinar is available free to RPI members in the RPI Learning Center. For more of Dr. Shuck’s insights, his Twitter handle is @drbshuck.

Tags:  culture  engagement  human resources  organization development  recognition principles  recognition research  Shuck  talent development 

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CRP Success Story: Jami Young, Asurion

Posted By By Jess Myers, RPI, Wednesday, October 18, 2017
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The mantra of life-long learning is alive and well in Jami Young, CRP. A senior manager of customer solutions engagement at Nashville-based Asurion, Young completed her CRP certification nearly a decade ago. But through the many resources available in the employee recognition world, her skills are in a state of constant updating.

If you own an insurance policy on your smartphone, there’s a good chance you’re an Asurion customer. The company, with around 10,000 employees in the U.S. and Canada, offers technology insurance policies. Young handles rewards and recognition for their call center operations and had been there for two years.

“I was able to come in and implement a system of measurements and involve our executive leadership in recognition,” Young said. “I needed to make sure we’re able to change as the business changes. I had training that was very conceptual, and now that I’m in it I see the importance of the structure involved in the recognition strategy model. When you’re in this role it’s such a collaborative effort and you have to able to show value at every step. I feel like CRP training was a huge driver  in that.”

Her CRP journey began nine years ago in Texas as Inspirus, where she worked with Theresa Harkins.

“Because Theresa was a certified trainer, we actually got to do CRP certification on site, which was really cool,” Young recalled. “That was my first jump into CRP training and I loved it. I feel it taught me a lot about why my customers were the practitioners of recognition, why it was important, how you show value to the rest of your organization and then how you start from scratch.”

Nearly a decade later, Young uses what she learned in the CRP program regularly.

“If I get in a rut, I have all of my CRP notebooks on hand and I’ll pull them out,” she said. “If I have to create a communications plan or a training program, I’ll pull out my CRP notebooks to see what the industry says and what my training says about the best practices in those areas.”

And the information available from RPI is an additional wealth of continuing education.

“I go to the RPI website all the time. There are really great whitepapers and presentations that you can review to see what other teams have done,” she said. “When it comes to this industry there are a lot of different ways of doing things. I’m not a HR professional, I’m an employee engagement professional. I’ve been on the operation support side of things, but I can get a lot of great information about what other companies do to drive recognition from the RPI website.”

A regular attendee at the RPI conference, Young said that with experience comes a propensity to tell colleagues about CRP certification and what a benefit it’s been in her career successes.

“It’s always going to be a part of what I do,” Young said. “I drank the Kool-Aid about recognition a long time ago so any chance I get I’ll push the certification to help people think about how they provide value. I think of CRP as a great way of helping strengthen our team. I want others to drink the Kool-Aid as well and I think RPI is a great way to do that.

 

Tags:  7 Best Practices  CRP  employee engagement 

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IRF Whitepaper

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Monday, September 25, 2017

There’s a running joke in the sports world that when a player is holding out for a better contract, and they say “it’s not about the money,” that means it’s totally about the money. But when successful companies focus on recognizing and rewarding their top employees, it seems that experts agree it’s not about the money.

In a recent whitepaper from the Incentive Research Foundation, they conducted an intensive study of the 10 things that top performing companies do differently. They found that among the best of the best, things like smart budgeting, strong support, advanced analytics and innovative design are all important factors. But among the top performing companies – defined as those that have high revenues, good growth, excellent customer ratings and excellent employee ratings – the most important thing they do well is treat their own people right.

From the study, the top factor in company success is “They have a strong belief in non-cash rewards and recognition.”

“When asked about their attitudes toward non-cash rewards and recognition, respondents at top performing companies were—across 11 metrics—significantly more likely to strongly agree with the benefits of non-cash rewards,” the study summary noted. “Notably, top performing companies were over 20% more likely to assert that their non-cash reward programs were effective recruitment, retention, and engagement tools. Top performing companies were also over 30% more likely to believe that their non-cash reward and recognition programs effectively influence behavior.”

IRF did a deep dive into successful companies to compile the study, reviewing more than 900 entities and selecting just over 300 of them for inclusion. The standards were strict. To be included companies needed $100 million of more in revenue, a revenue growth or stock price grown of greater than 5 percent, a customer retention rate of better than 90 percent or customer satisfaction of greater than 90 percent (along with a new customer acquisition rate of 5 percent or better), and employee satisfaction ratings of 90 percent or better.

The study found that top companies do things dramatically differently for their employees in terms of non-cash rewards and recognition. It echoes the mantra of countless RPI members about the growing importance of creative and consistent employee recognition, especially in this job market where attracting and retaining top talent has rarely been more challenging and important.

For more information and to download the full report, visit the IRF website.

Tags:  ertified Recognition Professional  ncentive Research Foundation  PI 7 Best Practices  recognition research  uman capital performance 

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Empathy Is Key To Successful Employee Recognition

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Wednesday, September 6, 2017

A quote from Aristotle reminds us to “Know thy audience.”

But what would a philosopher who has been dead for more than 2,300 years know of the modern business and recognition world? More than you might think, Klein relates, in a 45-minute webinar he delivered for RPI in the summer of 2016. His presentation is all about empathy, and its importance in designing employee recognition programs that are effective.

“We are all designers in everything we do,” said Klein, who was formerly director of client solutions for Maritz. “We design experiences, solutions, products, and customer touchpoints. We are even designing ways to get our teenagers to do their homework.”

Any good design begins with empathy, and success comes when we know the person for whom we are designing. Experts stress the importance of knowing the whole person, not just their economic motivation.

To illustrate this need for things both monetary and non-monetary, Klein cited the work of the late Paul Lawrence and Nitin Nohria of the Harvard University School of Business. In their book “Driven” the authors note four drivers of human behavior:

  • Acquire – the need to collect things, status and possessions
  • Defend – the need to hold on to what we have acquired
  • Bond – the need to be socially connected and be a part of a community
  • Create – the need to make a difference, and to be able to contribute

To help feed those needs in a recognition program, you should feed all four self-interest drivers to some extent. However, the key is to understand what people desire. That, again, is where empathy comes into play. If you are able to step into the shoes of another person and understand their perspective, you are better able to meet their wants and needs.

You don’t step into another’s shoes by imagining what they like, what they want, what they need. In the webinar, he detailed the methods used to learn about others – things like research, observation, playing the role of the customer, and other effective tactics that make you better at taking in the perspective of the subject.

There is much more about the effective use of empathy available by viewing the webinar. It is one of many available on the RPI website.

 

 

Tags:  Design Thinking  Empathy  Human Behavior  Human Resource Strategy  Motivation  Recognition Strategy 

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Charlotte Blank: Knowing Human Behavior Aids In Recognition Efforts

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Monday, August 21, 2017

We are all unique individuals, with our own tastes and preferences and voices. But a study of human behavior shows that people are remarkably similar in their ways of reacting to certain stimuli. Knowing those similarities and using them in developing recognition and rewards can greatly benefit your organization.

That was the primary message conveyed by Charlotte Blank, chief behavioral officer of Maritz, in a recent webinar hosted by RPI. Blank is a highly-regarded expert and speaker who leads Maritz’s practice of behavioral science and innovation through expert applications of social psychology and behavioral economics. Her passion is exploring the truths about human nature and discovering what “makes us tick.”

She began with a study where people were asked to complete a complicated set of tasks on paper – a lengthy and time-consuming effort, for which they were compensated with a decreasing amount of cash each round. The researchers studied how long the workers would persist, before giving up the task. Upon completion of the tasks, they were told to turn their paper in to an instructor at the front of the room. The instructor reacted to the papers being turned in one of three ways:

  • with a simple nod of acknowledgement
  • with no reaction at all
  • by dropping the completed paper into a shredder

Somewhat predictably, the subjects whose papers were shredded were the first to give up. Those whose work was ignored, came in a close second. Interestingly, those whose work was acknowledged with a simple nod of the head persisted much longer than did those who had been ignored, or those who had seen their papers shredded. The lesson, Blank said, is that well beyond compensation, acknowledgement matters, and gives people’s work a sense of meaning. Even a simple nod goes a long way.

The webinar explored important questions, like what makes someone take the time to recognize another’s efforts? Why is this so important? How can firms create a culture of gratitude and recognition?

The scientific study of human behavior reveals fascinating insights into the motivation of recognition – and surprisingly simple tactics to nudge behaviors that contribute to this virtuous cycle. A huge part of Blank’s work is to learn how taking a scientific approach to recognition can enhance employee engagement in the workplace.

For example, it’s human nature that most people are delighted by receiving an unexpected gift. Studies in the workplace have shown that gifts can be as efficient a tool as adding another worker in terms of boosting productivity. If part of a worker’s payment for a job is framed as an unanticipated gift, it predictably boost output and job satisfaction.

Blank also espouses the power of the nudge – a small change to the environment that can have positive outside effects on behavior. Among the tactics she advocates to make a positive change include:

  • Using image-based vision statements. For example, an abstract notion like “delight our customers” is less powerful than an image-based statement like “put a smile on every child’s face.”
  • Operational transparency. People better understand the value of something if they see the work and the steps that are taken on the way to the finished product. An example of this is restaurants that have a window into the kitchen, so diners can see the steps being taken to create a meal, and better understand the value of it.
  • Make recognition a social norm. Behavior studies show that often people like to conform. So for example, a hotel room sign asking people to re-use their towels is less effective than a sign stating, “Most guests staying in this room re-use their towels.” If we feel similar to others, we are more compelled to do what others do.

With years of research behind her, Blank has much more to offer and share on the topic. Her most recent webinar and additional contributions she has made to the field of study are available for RPI members at www.recognition.org.

Tags:  Charlotte Blank  Maritz  recognition 

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CRP Graduates Tout The Certification’s Value

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Friday, August 11, 2017

Since its launch a decade ago, recognition professionals from every corner of North America have learned the value of certification to their career and their organization’s employee engagement success. Recognition Professionals International made all of its Certified Recognition Professional® (CRP) courses available online in February, to grow our graduate community.

In recent weeks, several recognition professionals have offered their testimonials about CRP, and the value it provides in the profession:

“Since becoming a Certified Recognition Professional nine years ago, I have used the knowledge, expertise and industry best practices I gained to help my clients structure award-winning, sustainable programs.  Each year RPI offers opportunities for professional development that allow CRPs to remain on the cutting edge of this dynamic industry and I am grateful to be a part of this thriving community.” – Dee Hansford, CRP, Dee Hansford Consulting.

“I have found the CRP certification to be valuable not only to my professional growth, but most importantly a great benefit to the clients that I support. The certification has given me the confidence to guide clients to best practice recognition solutions. This is critical for building a culture of appreciation and the long-term success of their recognition initiatives.” – Kelli Johnson, CRP, Launch Manager, O.C. Tanner Company.

“Having worked in and out of the recognition industry for the past 15 years, it wasn’t until I went through the certification process that I fully understood the systematic methods and strategies of recognition and incentives. Obtaining my CRP and going through recertification has provided a fundamental foundation as well as competencies required for implementing and assessing programs/campaigns.  If you are thinking about pursuing your certification, just GO FOR IT!”  – Lori Rains, MA, CRP, Senior Program Manager, Spear One.

“Obtaining my CRP was the icing on the cake when I was called to write a reward and recognition program for over 10,000 employees. Having the resources and materials to reflect on my learning ensured that we had a quality recognition program using the best poractice standards.  I encourage anyone who has a passion or their job supports reward and recognition to take the RPI CRP program.  The networking and information is invaluable!  Thanks RPI.” – Carole Erken, CRP, Director of Human Resources, Kaiser Permanente.

“Going through the RPI certification was certainly a turning point in my career. As a solutions provider, it was extremely beneficial to learn more in depth about the science behind recognition and study the countless examples of what drives success. There were many ‘A-ha’ moments throughout. The focus on seven best practices and why they are crucial to a successful recognition program forms the basis of what RPI is all about. Amazing organization, I’d highly recommend the CRP courses they have certainly helped in my career, by influencing our internal strategy for recognition as well as how we deliver for our clients.” – Mark A. Prine, CRP, Vice President, National Accounts, EGR International Inc.

Goals of the CRP program include:

  • To raise the professional standards of those engaged in employee recognition.
  • To encourage continuing education for professional development.
  • To encourage self-development by offering guidelines for achievement in the employee recognition profession.
  • To identify and award special recognition to those persons who have demonstrated a comprehensive knowledge of those principles and practices of employee recognition and also laws governing and affecting employee recognition.

CRP designation consists of four courses and exams. All CRP candidates receive the comprehensive learning guide which includes valuable templates, worksheets and case studies that can be utilized to implement a recognition program based on RPI’s Seven Best Practices. Each course is $595 for practitioner premium/business partner members; $750 for basic RPI members and $795 for non-members. Until October 1, 2017, participants can save $75 on each course by using the promo code “Recognition17” when registering.

CRP designation demonstrates to leaders, peers and clients a commitment to continuing education and excellence in the discipline of workforce recognition. RPI’s program is renowned as the most comprehensive, authoritative resource for individuals seeking to develop and test their skills and knowledge within this field.

RPI offers a webinar featuring additional testimonials from several CRP graduates. For more information, please visit the official RPI website, www.rec

 

Tags:  certification  CRP  employee engagement  recognition strategies 

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Recognition Professionals International

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Phone: 651-290-7490 | Fax: 651-290-2266 | info@recognition.org
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