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Recognition in The Real World
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A Simple Breakdown of Recognition

Posted By Ava Ewald, Thursday, February 13, 2020
Updated: Friday, February 14, 2020

RPI’s mission is to educate about recognition. Its 7 Best Practice Standards® lay out the framework to successfully implement recognition practices in your organization. Standard 1 of the 7 Best Practice Standards is Recognition Strategy. In order to form your strategy, read below for a simple breakdown of what recognition is.

 

According to Human Resources Director magazine, “Strategic employee recognition is when appreciation is shown for an action that has helped improve the employee or customer experience in a way that supports the organization’s values, purpose or objectives.” To better understand recognition, we will break it down into what it is and what it is not.

 

What it is:

1)      Consistent

Forbes explains that a well-build recognition program should make engaging in recognition simple, so it does not take much effort to keep it going when things get busy. Consistency is key to building a great recognition program as it becomes engrained into the company culture. It also tells your employees that they should expect recognition when they are on the right track.

2)      Individualized

Harvard Business Review suggests that recognition should be tailored to the person you are recognizing. Some people like being recognized in from if their peers, while some prefer a quiet “thank you” at their desk. It may also help to know your employees’ preferences on things like restaurants and activities. Consider sending out an appreciation form like this one from Texas A&M University to your employees to gather this information and have it on file.

3)      Reflective of Organizational Values

HBR says that recognition is the perfect opportunity to reinforce the values of your organization. Identify what behaviors represent those values and make a point of consistently recognizing them. Praising these behaviors often communicates company values to employees better than newsletters and speeches.

 

What it is not:

1)      Vague

According to Forbes, it is important to be specific when recognizing someone. While employee of the month awards are great, they fail to address what the employee specifically did right. When you begin to recognize specific behaviors, you will see them repeat.

2)      Passive

HBR gives the example of a manager who gives out a $25 restaurant gift card every quarter. While consistent, the manager is failing to be active in recognition. Take some time to recognize each person or team differently based on what they like and what they have done to warrant praise. It should always feel genuine.

3)      Difficult

If you do not have much time to spare, recognition can be as simple as “Hey Jenn, thanks so much for going the extra mile for our client this morning.” It is all about these genuine interactions between you and your employees.

 

To learn more about RPI’s 7 Best Practices click here.

Check out our new resource hub here!

 

Tags:  engagement  recognition  RPI 7 Best Practices 

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