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Recognition in The Real World
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How to Write a Great Employee Engagement Survey

Posted By Ava Ewald, Thursday, February 13, 2020
Updated: Tuesday, February 18, 2020

RPI is at the forefront of employee engagement practices, developing the 7 RPI Best Practice Standards® based a wealth of knowledge collected from academics, industry leaders and conferences. These standards are designed to help grow your organization’s recognition program.

Standard 1 is Recognition Strategy and the second is management responsibility. Both are essential in growing engagement in your organization. Harvard Business Review suggests that surveys are one of the greatest ways to make your employees feel heard.

Built In, an online technology news platform recently published a comprehensive guide to creating an effective employee engagement survey. Here are some of the best takeaways:

 

1.      Identify a goal for your survey

Consider what you would like to see change as a result of your survey. Do you want to see more enthusiastic interactions with clients? Would you like to see more teamwork between employees? Make sure there is a clear direction to your survey.

·         Tailor your questions to fit your goal. Where you see areas that need growth, make sure they are addressed on the survey to get your employees’ take on those areas.

·         Keep track of these goals. Growth can not be achieved without measurement to inform change.

2.      Avoid yes/no questions

Simple yes/no questions do not fully explore a person’s opinion or feelings on the question at hand. It does not give room for explanation. For example, “are you happy at work?” could warrant a vast range of responses and opening up the question will give you more thoughtful responses and better insight.

·         Remember who, what, when, where, why and how. These question starters will help you get the responses you want.

·         Putting open-ended questions on your surveys gives your employees the space to articulate their opinions and feelings in a detailed and thoughtful way.

3.      Utilize Scaled Questions

Contrasting open-ended questions, scaled questions can be a great way to get quick results or mix up questions types within a larger survey.

·         These questions are often a 5- or 10-point scale, giving a range of 1- “very unsatisfied” to 10- “very satisfied,” for example.

·         Built In suggests that in general, answers on a 10-point scale ranging 8-10 are positive and 1-4 means improvement is needed.

4.      Analyze your results

A survey does not mean anything if you do not utilize the information you gathered to inform change. Once your survey is completed, take the time to sit down and carefully review the results.

·         Compare your results to industry standards. Decision Wise compiled the results of many engagement surveys so you can see how your results stack up against others. This article also has ideas for survey questions.

·         Create a plan to implement the ideas you received in the survey. When your employees see real change from their feedback, they will be encouraged when completing additional surveys in the future.

 

To learn more about RPI’s 7 Best Practices click here.

Check out our new resource hub here!

 

Tags:  employee engagement  recognition  RPI 7 Best Practices  survey 

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