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Recognition Communications That They Will Actually Read

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Monday, June 19, 2017

A year ago it was estimated that on average, the American worker gets 88 emails in their inbox every day. Of those, 76 of them are work-related, with another dozen classified as personal or Spam. In the 12 months since that number was determined, it’s almost certainly gotten worse.

So amid that daily tsunami of electronic mail, how do you create and distribute recognition messages that your target audience will actually read? That was the question posed, and answered in a 2016 RPI webinar that’s available for association members.

The 45-minute webinar is presented by Jessica Schwaller and Katherine Shick of Kforce, Inc., a Florida-based professional staffing firm which has been a Best in Class award  winner  for Standard 1:Recognition Strategy and Standard 4: Communication Plan for RPI’s Best Practice Awards.

To cut through the clutter that fills our inboxes every day, and create recognition programs that get noticed, they first focus on the company’s mission, which stresses that Kforce employees are recognized, inspired and valued.

Some tips from the Kforce recognition team:

  • Be creative
    • Subject lines are what first catch someone’s attention. Focus on them, as the front door to your email communication and your first opportunity to catch someone’s eye.
    • Brainstorm with your team over coffee, and look for ways to make an emotional connection.
    • Think outside the normal world of day-to-day corporate communications.
  • Have goals
    • Among their stated goals for employee engagement programs are to create company awareness, to recognize performance and to positively change behavior.
    • Measure your success by looking at things like how many emails were opened, how many links were clicked, etc., and learn from the success or lack thereof from various campaigns.
  • Be audience aware
    • If you’re recognizing an employee (we’ll call him Steve) the message you send will surely be interesting to Steve. But work to make it engaging and interesting to Steve’s co-workers as well.
    • Tell the whole story, including Steve’s background, and what Steve did to deserve recognition, so others see an example they can emulate.
  • Try different vehicles
    • Email has become the standard for office communication, and it’s very valuable, but don’t limit yourself to email.
    • Use your company intranet. Send a postcard (everyone loves mail). Use your phone and YouTube to create a fun video. Hand out printed fliers in the office.
    • And think about where you can use those vehicles, beyond just the recipient’s cubicle. Be creative with office common areas, and even outside the office to reach employees.

Schwaller and Shick use myriad examples of Kforce initiatives that give supervisors freedom to acknowledge the subculture of their own groups, and to provide input to tailor messages and efforts that are timely, touching and telling. They provide many examples in the webinar which have proven to be valuable to recognition professionals as they work on eye-catching efforts in their own settings.

For more information, please visit the RPI website at Recognition.org. Premium Practitioner Members and Business Partners get full access to almost 30 on-demand webinars. Basic Practitioner Members which is free get limited access to webinars.

Tags:  est Practice Awards  mployee engagement  ommunication Strategy  RPI 7 Best Practices  ulture 

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Don’t Get Skunked: The Health Risks of a Dysfunctional Workplace

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Friday, June 9, 2017
You come home from the stereotypical “bad day at the office” feeling like you need a drink to calm down. You eat a big meal – bigger than normal – to take some comfort and forget about the stresses of the workplace. That night, you have trouble getting to sleep, replaying the previous day’s workplace stress in your head. Happens to all of us, right?

If that happens routinely, you might be getting “skunked” by a dysfunctional boss, or a dysfunctional workplace. That’s the term coined by Brad Shuck, an associate professor in the University of Louisville’s Department of Educational Leadership, Evaluation and Organizational Development has coined for bad workplaces that literally can be hard on your health.

If you’ve ever come across a skunk in the wild and felt the full brunt of their natural defense mechanism, you know what a smelly situation it creates. You let off an odor that affects those around you, and you need help and time to get that stench off.

The effects on your long-term health from working in a challenging environment can be similary damaging.

“Think about incredibly high stress, high pressure work environments,” Shuck said in a recent radio interview. “The mechanisms that people use to cope with that stress – excessive drinking, overeating, a lack of exercise – can directly contribute to long-term health problems like diabetes and high blood pressure.”

Shuck, a renowned expert on employee engagement, is co-author of a study on the topic entitled “Skunked: An Integrative Review Exploring the Consequences of the Dysfunctional Leader and Implications for Those Employees Who Work for Them.” He developed the term, along with co-authors Dr. Kevin Rose, Dr. Matt Bergman and Dr. Devon Twyford. In the study, they noted that somewhere between 13% and 36% of employees in the United States work with a leader whose approach could be described as dysfunctional.

That’s trouble, not only for the employee, but for the company when you consider long-term healthcare costs.

“The essential idea is this: when you work in a place that is dysfunctional, meaning high chronic stress and lots of negative things going on, that impacts your long-term health,” Shuck said. “Leaders who work in these kinds of places are called ‘stinky’ leaders.”

Shuck jokes that “stinky” is not exactly an academic or highly technical term, but sees it as fitting.

“A dysfunctional boss will do the same to their employees as a skunk does to people in the wild,” Shuck said. “It takes a real effort and intentional healing to move on from a dysfunctional work situation.” The good news is that for the first time, research by Shuck and others is able to show a real return on investment for companies who intentionally develop engaging places to work. If employees are engaged, feel appreciated and are happier at work, they’re healthier. Productivity and profitability go through the roof. Higher levels of engagement equates to better workplace health.

As Shuck notes, even for a medium-sized company, the potential savings in healthcare costs alone run into the millions.

So if those bad days at work are becoming more frequent, and leading to unhealthy behaviors, he stresses that employers and employees alike should be aware, and make sure they’re not getting skunked in the workplace.

Tags:  Culture  Human resources  Leadership  Management responsibility 

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Business Case Data Shows Employee Recognition Value

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Monday, June 5, 2017
Small Doses Archive

There are many recent studies that show the impact of highly-engaged employees to the organization, and the impact recognition has to increasing engagement. You need this data when building your business case for recognition.

Here are a few examples:

Gallup Employee Engagement Study – July 2015

  • “Gallup categorizes workers as ‘engaged’ based on their ratings of key workplace elements that predict important organizational performance outcomes. Engaged employees are involved in, enthusiastic about and committed to their work.”
  • “Employee engagement is directly influenced by their managers’ engagement.”
  • “The percentage of U.S. workers engaged in their job continued to hold steady at 31.9%...but is higher than it was in 2011-13.”

Fortune’s Best Companies to Work For shows over two times better stock returns than the general market.

The Ultimate Guide to Employee Recognition by Achievers

  • Engaged employees perform 20% better and are 87% less likely to leave their organization.
  • Organizations with high engagement rates are 78% more productive and 40% more profitable than those organizations with low levels of engagement.
  • 80% of employees stated recognition is a strong motivator of work performance and 70% stated they would work harder with continuous recognition.

Internal Business Case

Obviously there are numerous studies supporting the value of recognition to the bottom line. Sometimes, it is even more powerful to have a study inside your organization.

If you measure employee engagement, or some other type of assessment that looks at how willing an employee is to spend extra time and effort, if they speak positively about the organization and if they say good things about your organization, you can use that as a beginning point.

Approach:

  • Results-neutral…take an unbiased view of the outcome. Understand the relevance of the engagement measure.
  • “So what?”…identify practical steps to improve business performance through behaviors measured on the survey.
  • Scientific approach…control for as many of the variables that affect both engagement and measures of business performance.
    • To accomplish this, select one business or department;
    • Work with the production and finance teams to gather clean, accurate performance data for the analysis;
    • Keep the data collection confined to one specific region to avoid the culture bias;
    • Ensure the business is big enough to give a large enough snapshot;
    • Assure the metrics used are rigorous and consistent.

Compare locations of the business units that score above a certain score and below a certain score on the employee engagement type assessment by such things as turnover, efficiency, shrink (product loss), return on investment (or other overall financial measure), safety and customer loyalty/satisfaction.


The business data case studies and internal survey samples are included in the course materials in the Certified Recognition Professional program. For more information on CRP certification, please visit http://www.recognition.org/?page=crp_certification. To view a webinar on CRP, click here.

Tags:  CRP  engagement  recognition business case  ROI on recognition strategy 

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RPI Success Stories: Cleveland Clinic

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Tuesday, May 30, 2017

Founded nearly a century ago, in 1921, Cleveland Clinic has grown from a small surgical practice into one of the world’s most renowned names in healthcare. From its base in Ohio, Cleveland Clinic now has facilities in three states and three countries, with over 1,400 beds.

Known as a great place to go for care, Cleveland Clinic is also renowned as a great place to work due to its top-level employee recognition program. The clinic received the RPI Best Practices® Overall Excellence Award in 2015. In its participant guide entitled “Building a Blueprint” RPI took a closer look at Cleveland Clinic’s methods of assessing and improving its employee recognition programs in this case study:

Assessment

Cleveland Clinic currently utilizes the annual employee engagement survey to gauge employee satisfaction with recognition programs. The scores for the Q4 question on recognition have increased year over year from 3.26 in 2009 to 3.95 in 2013, while at the same time employee engagement and patient satisfaction scores are on the rise. These indicators, along with the high utilization of the program, point to the overall satisfaction with the recognition program.

Recognition Strategy

Driving change is a challenging task for any organization. In 2010, Cleveland Clinic, with over 43,000 employees—including 3,100 physicians and scientists and 11,000 nurses—embarked on a remarkable journey; the creation and roll out of an enterprise-wide employee recognition program called Caregiver Celebrations.

Driven by a passion for patient-centered care, the clinic embraced a new vision statement, “Striving to be the world’s leader in patient experience, clinical outcomes, research and education.” While physicians and nurses are the primary caregivers in any hospital, the increased focus on the total patient—and not just the patient’s clinical outcome—drew attention to the vital role played by other hospital employees. Thus the new organizational imperative, “we are all caregivers.”

Caregiver Celebrations, which is a part of the Total Rewards strategy, is a recognition program that is designed specifically to drive the clinic’s overall mission of “Patients First,” improve employee engagement, and ultimately, deliver world class care to patients. Fundamentally grounded in Cleveland Clinic’s core values, Caregiver Celebrations is built upon a rewards and recognition technology platform that enables recognition to flow to and from key stakeholders, including staff, patients, and supporting partners.

Extremely flexible and easy to use, Caregiver Celebrations uses totally customizable programs and powerful analytics to deliver robust recognition tools, highly reliable metrics and continually fresh award experiences.


The Cleveland Clinic case study is included in the course materials in the Certified Recognition Professional program. For more information on CRP certification, please visit http://www.recognition.org/?page=crp_certification. To view a webinar on CRP, click here.

 

Tags:  culture  employee appreciation  RPI Best Practices  Workforce recognition 

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RBC & BAE Systems Honored at 2017 RPI Conference

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Thursday, May 18, 2017

Two prominent Recognition Professionals International members flew home from South Florida with more than good suntans earlier this month.

International banking leader RBC was honored with the Best Practice Standards® Award for employee recognition programs by RPI at their recent annual conference, held in Fort Lauderdale in early May.

Each year, RPI selects one recognition program for the "Best Overall Recognition Program" award, and also selects “Excellence in Standards” awards based on the recognition program elements, including:

  • providing access to best-practice standards, education, research, and the exchange of ideas,
  • creating opportunities for our diverse membership to grow professionally, and
  • advocating recognition and engagement strategies as a means to promote organizational excellence.

Founded as the Royal Bank of Canada, today RBC has approximately 79,000 client-focused and committed employees and is renowned as an exceptional source of advice for 16 million clients worldwide. RBC excelled in all of the recognition standards used by RPI to determine its annual award winners.

“There is a clear and direct linkage between the organization’s domestic and international vision(s), shared values and business goals to its recognition strategy,” said judges who determined the eventual winner of RPI’s top honor. “There are robust programs and processes to reinforce the mission, vision and values in every dimension of recognition dimension – from day-to-day to informal and up through the formal tier. RBC has long been a role model for recognition, not just in the financial industry, but across industry and international borders as well.”

All of RBC’s recognition and reward programs under the RBC Performance brand align with their purpose, vision, and values to become a leader in financial services wherever in the world they serve customers. RBC Performance, RBC’s flagship program was launched in 1993 as a sales incentive points reward and recognition program and now serves over 75,000 employees. RBC Performance is a comprehensive recognition system dedicated to improving RBC’s financial and service performance results and senior leaders of RBC have direct input into the direction of employee recognition to achieve its people and talent strategy objectives as well as sustainable business growth programs.

RPI also acknowledged BAE Systems with Excellence awards in three areas: strategy, communication, and change and flexibility. BAE Systems IMPACT is a company-wide program to recognize and reward employee accomplishments. Tied to their Total Performance culture and their company values of trusted, innovative, and bold, IMPACT makes it easy to recognize employees for making an impact on BAE System’s business.

“BAE has done a great job of consolidating recognition under one umbrella and providing consistent awards across the organization. BAE has strengthened their recognition efforts and has made significant strides in the areas of measurement, change and flexibility,” judges said. “They have been thoughtful and considerate of their people by providing tax assistance on monetary awards. Great strides made in usage of program as evidenced by increased participation”

For more information on the conference and award winners, visit the RPI web site -- www.recognition.org.

Tags:  Recognition Awards  Recognition Program Best Practices  Recognition Program models 

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We Need to Get Inside People's Heads to Fully Appreciate Recognition, Says Author

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Friday, April 28, 2017
There’s a little rush of a chemical called dopamine inside the brain when you take a bite of chocolate, or when you hit on a winner at the card table, or when a big fish bites your line. It's the neurobiological mechanism behind why we find something pleasurable. It’s hard science.

Similarly, when you are recognized for good work by your employer or receive an incentive for a job well done, you get that same jolt of pleasure in your brain. That’s part of the message keynote speaker Rodd Wagner will deliver at the RPI Annual Conference in Fort Lauderdale. His presentation, entitled “Inside the Mind of an Employee: The Good, the Bad and the Neurobiology,” explores the science behind employee reciprocity and how good companies use that science to their benefit.

Wagner is the New York Times bestselling author of Widgets: The 12 New Rules for Managing Your Employees As If They're Real People. He’s also a regular columnist in Forbes, and Vice President of Employee Engagement Strategy at BI Worldwide, based in Minnesota.

“You could make the case that we don’t need to know what's going on inside people’s brains,” said Wagner. “I can prove survey research and performance data that there’s every reason to ensure a company recognizes solid performance. I don’t need the brain science.”

Yet for years, Wagner says employee engagement has been considered a “soft science” because it could not be observed in the same way as operations, accounting, or one of the more traditionally concrete aspects of running a business. He believes sharing the evidence of what predictably happens inside employees’ brains has the potential to help skeptical executives understand how the science of motivation is just as reliable as any of the other disciplines.

“Getting recognized at work tickles something in a part of the human brain, and people who are happiest reciprocate that emotion with dedication. Humans are very reciprocal creatures,” he said. “We find that when companies take a genuine interest in keeping people happy, those people will take a genuine interest in making the company succeed.”

Wagner enjoys doing a little myth-busting in his columns and speeches. One he has taken on lately is the widely circulated idea that a minority of people are “engaged” at work. Engagement could be better, he said, but “there is no crisis.”

“Most people at least like their jobs, and some love them,” Wagner said.

He also argues with current assertions in the engagement industry that employee happiness is not the right goal for a business.

“Happiness remains very important to employees,” he said. “It’s still the overriding reason people take a job and stay in a job. Any properly fielded and analyzed research shows the pattern.”

Wagner frequently speaks on similar topics to business and industry groups around the country. While some of his keynote will be taken from his most recent book, he will also be showing first at RPI new analyses from the most recent of BI Worldwide's annual studies on employee’s relationships with their employers.

Among the lines on inquiry in his most recent study is what psychologists call “theory of mind.”

“It’s a uniquely human characteristic to be able to estimate what the other person is thinking or intends, and it’s turning out to be an intriguing area for engagement research,” Wagner said. In his most recent study, Wagner asked people three questions about their companies' intentions, among them the statement, “My employer is seeking to make me happy.”

“Now, of course, people don’t know for certain what their leaders’ intentions are, but it is fascinating to me how predictive these types of core motivation questions are of a person's commitment to the company,” said the author. “Employees are most driven to perform when they believe the company is not investing them just because of the potential return, but because they feel a moral obligation to their people.”

Wagner wrote about the results in a recent Forbes column, where he advised employees to calibrate their commitment to their companies with those core intentions of the firm. “Organizations often deliver similar perks and benefits for different reasons.” he wrote. “A mismatch between your company’s intentions and yours can hurt your career.”

For more information on Wagner’s keynote and a full schedule, please visit the conference web site.

Tags:  recognition  Recognition Research  recognition strategy  Research Studies  Trends 

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Blank to Discuss Applying Biometrics to Employee Rewards at RPI Conference

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Monday, April 17, 2017
“Everybody needs money. That’s why they call it money,” said Danny DeVito’s character in the 2001 movie, Heist. Indeed, given a choice between cash and other potential rewards for a job well done, most people explicitly choose the money, but that might not be what they really want.

 

It’s a fascinating topic that Charlotte Blank, executive director of The Maritz Institute, will explore at the 2017 RPI Conference. Blank’s presentation is entitled “Cash, Travel, and Neuroscience: Biometric science reveals new insights in motivation and rewards.” It’s truly a groundbreaking look at how humans react when faced with a choice of cash or non-cash rewards.

In the past, designing rewards and incentives has relied heavily on things like surveys, interviews and focus groups to try to determine which kind of rewards people would prefer. At the same time, the advertising industry has been using more advanced techniques to study reactions in the human body to determine preferences.

For the first time, Blank and her colleagues have employed neuro-scientific and biometric techniques to understand the influence of the subconscious in reward preference. In 2016, The Maritz Institute and the IRF commissioned a study in which more than 40 professionals underwent biometric testing, including facial expression analysis, eye movement and heart rate monitoring, pupil dilation and Galvanic Skin Response (GSR).

Subjects were immersed in realistic scenarios and presented a range of cash and non-cash rewards. Their intuitive reactions and ultimate choice of rewards might alter much of what you thought you knew about reward preference.

“When you give people the option, they deliberately select cash, but we have found that people perform better and work harder for non-cash rewards,” Blank said. “People get more emotionally excited by non-cash rewards.”

How do we know that? Via the use of biometrics, which measure how much a subject’s pupils dilate when they’re show various items; a sign of excitement and interest. Blank covers a full range of findings in her presentation, but among them is the idea that people choose experiences more quickly that they choose cash. The time to make a choice with a cash reward is increased, suggesting that perhaps people spend more time considering what they would do with the money if they were given a cash reward for their efforts.

“There’s much more that we can measure, and more results we can explore,” Blank said. “But this is a fascinating first glimpse at how biometrics can help us better understand the world of effective employee recognition.”

For more information about Blank’s presentation, please visit the 2017 annual conference page.

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Hargrove to explore the Science of Happiness at RPI 2017

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Imagine living in prehistoric times, and think of two things: 1) a beautiful, sunny day, with enough food and a warm fire in the evening, and 2) trying to make it back to camp, frightened, wary of the encroaching predators that are looking to you to be their next meal.

Since your life literally depends on the proper handling of one of those scenarios, while the other is enjoyable but less vital, it makes sense that negative emotions like fear have a more prominent place in your head than positive emotions. Sadly, millions of years later, the human brain is still wired that way.

“That’s how memories are stored in our brain, going back to the caveman days. We tend to remember the negative more than then positive,” said Vicki Hargrove, author of the book “Make Someone Smile” and one of the featured presenters at the upcoming RPI Annual Conference, April 30 to May 2 in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

Hargrove’s presentation, entitled “The Science of Happiness” explores what motivates people to do the things that they do, or fail to do. Why do some people perform beyond expectations and others below expectations? All of these actions are coordinated, controlled and regulated by an organ about the size of a small head of cauliflower – the brain. Hargrove strives to help attendees learn how they can help your employees “re-wire” their brains so that they are more positive about their work and their organization.

“It’s nothing Orwellian, we’re trying to make connections and foster engagement,” Hargrove said. “Workers with a positive attitude have a more positive experience at work, and that attitude pays benefits, for the employee and for the employer, when someone believes in what they’re doing and feels they’re part of the bigger picture in the workplace.”

Attitudes come from different places, Hargrove said. About 50 percent of a person’s outlook is genetic, 10 percent is environmental and 40 percent comes from the inside – how we react to what’s around us. She uses the example of asking hypothetically what someone would do with a million dollars. If they answer with dreams of trips and toys, their attitude is generally positive. If they make note that they would have to pay the taxes on that windfall, their attitude is more negative.

Hargrove is a Certified Recognition Professional who spent much of her career with Cargill, based in Minnesota, and retired in 2011 to start her own business, Hargrove Business Consulting. Based in Florida, she works with business to help them foster positive, productive attitudes among their workers, and always has a receptive audience in her grandchildren, who know grandma’s first question every time they meet will be:

“What did you do today to make someone smile?”

For more information on the 2017 RPI conference and a full schedule, please visit the official event website.

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Recognition, the Southwest Way

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Monday, April 3, 2017

Known for innovation in plane boarding and creating a lively, fun atmosphere, Southwest Airlines has earned a reputation as an innovator. While preferred seating and other “normal” tenants of the air travel world are sought by some travelers, Southwest has found that a vast number of their passengers just want to be treated equitably -- and the same is being said for employees.  The airline is taking recognition to a new level by making sure all employees are treated fairly and with equity. 

The goal began inside the company’s Texas headquarters when it comes to recognizing great work among employees – a successful program that Tonda Ferguson has had a vital role in running during her 30-plus years with the airline. Today, she can admit that at one time there was very little equity in the program, which was a problem.

“It varied so much. In one department a top employee would be rewarded with a free car, and in another they’d get a free lunch,” Ferguson recalled. “Employees want equity in the workplace. It all needs to feed into one system.”

Southwest undertook a large-scale revamp of its employee recognition system, and emerged with two programs that have proven to be both popular and successful. “SWAG” is an acronym for Southwest Airlines Gratitude” and it’s a program by which employees can earn points which can be applied for shopping sprees and space available airline seats that can be given to friends. It was an important perk for airline employees who are used to flight privileges. The SWAG system allows points to be accumulated so employees can fly with friends, family and others, and they can even get a confirmed seat.

Ferguson also runs the bigger program, called “Kick Tail” which rewards employees for the company meeting goals, and furthering its legendary culture of customer service.  It’s a rapid reward for things like the company ranking atop airline service surveys or being the top on-time airline.

“It shows how you can take company goals and turn them into an employee recognition effort,” she said. “Employees really love the program.”

Recognizing that getting an award in front of your co-workers is in itself a reward, Southwest also directs the Kick Tail Prize Patrol, which makes a big show of surprising employees with an award, complete with balloons and cheers, that gets noticed by others. They’ve even been known to have the company CEO show up to hand out cash rewards for good work.

“Sometimes companies struggle to make it fun, but now everyone is pulling in the same direction,” said Ferguson, who will offer a presentation on the Southwest way of employee recognition at the upcoming RPI Annual Conference in late April. “Now we can move quickly, and when people are living the Southwest way, we can recognize them at the drop of a hat.”

Tags:  recognition  southwest 

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Non-monetary rewards a staple of Founding Fathers’ success

Posted By By Jess Myers, RPI, Friday, March 17, 2017

The importance of finding non-monetary ways to inspire people isn’t a new concept. If George Washington was here today, even 200-plus years after his death, he could tell you as much.

During a brutal Revolutionary War battle in the wilds of New Jersey, stuck in a valley between Princeton and Trenton, Washington offered his rebel troops a fiscal incentive as he pleaded with them to join him in a dangerous advance against the British. No one took him up on the offer. He tried again, appealing to their love of country and family, asking the men before him to take up arms against their numerically superior foe one more time. The inspiration worked.

“You can’t motivate people. That comes from within,” said Kevin Ames in a recent webinar for RPI members. “But you can inspire them. You can’t drive engagement, you can only inspire it.”

Ames, the director of speaking and training for O.C. Tanner, has more than two decades of experience working with companies on how and why to inspire their employees to do great work. He stresses that relationships are more than the bank account -- the heart and soul are where you make true and lasting connections with people. In his hour-long talk, Ames listed six key influencers that lead to success in employee recognition and rewards.

  • Purpose – Identify and articulate a higher a purpose, then connect people to that purpose.
  • Opportunity – Make sure people have the opportunity to learn, grow, contribute and be recognized for their achievements.
  • Success – This comes in many forms, including financial, environmental and social, but above these, cultural success is the greatest.
  • Appreciation – For their psychological survival, people need to be understood, affirmed, validated and appreciated. Recognition of this is the most important factor in producing great work.
  • Well-Being – More than just a health concept, this encompasses all dimensions of body, mind and spirit.
  • Leadership – A successful leader is one with impact, influence and inspiration as their key strengths.

Ames engaging talk used not only Washington’s battlefield success, but simple examples like the work of shepherds leading their sheep from the front to higher elevation pastures where they are naturally reluctant to go on their own. Straying from the path helped the shepherds find abundant food – one of the key elements to their health and well-being.

The full webinar is available online, free to RPI members.

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Thank You, Business Partners

2017 Recognition Professionals International

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St. Paul, Minnesota 55114
Phone: 651-290-7490 | Fax: 651-290-2266 | info@recognition.org
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